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Note Cards

Education was essential in the development of the mind of Martin Luther King, Jr. From his matriculation at Morehouse College through his doctoral studies at Boston University, Dr. King took notes on various subjects and referenced some of the most important philosophers of all time. The note cards shown in this section give you a glimpse into the molding of one of the world’s most brilliant thinkers and orators. Religion, natural law, metaphysics and the meaning of wisdom are just a few of the topics highlighted. These subjects and many more helped Dr. King’s capacity to expand his intellectual and spiritual capacity three dimensionally.

Definitions

Dr. King defines a set of words such as, "Gospel" and "Justification."

Day of the Lord

Dr. King writes about the "Day of the Lord," as mentioned in the Old Testament book, Zephaniah.

Individualization

Dr. King cites philosopher and theologian Paul Tillich's definition of individualization. He explains, "it is implied in and constitutive of every self, which means that at least in an analogous way it is implied in and constitutive of every being."

Suffering

Dr. King quotes William James' essay "Is Life Worth Living?"

Notecard Listing Various Scriptures from Isaiah

Dr. King lists numerous scriptures from the Old Testament book of Isaiah related to the topics of righteous living, anger and sin.

Pelagianism

Dr. King defines Pelagianism as the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without divine aid.

Sabellianism

Dr. King defines "Sabellianism" as the concept of acknowledging God as one entity with three modes.

Category Time

Dr. King outlines Paul Tillich's view on time.

God

Dr. King writes about God's love according to Ezra 3:11.

Exodus

Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Biblical book of Exodus. Highlighted topics include knowledge, ethics, the doctrine of God, and sin.

Fascism

Dr. King paraphrases one of Benito Mussolini's thoughts on fascism in "The Political and Social Doctrine of Fascism.

The Categories

Dr. King contemplates the fourth level of ontological concepts, which focus on the categories of thought and being. Referencing Paul Tillich, King notes the categories that are most relevant to theology.

Methodology, Tests of Truth

Dr. King discusses Henry Nelson Wieman's test of truth in religion described in "The Source of Human Good."

Traditionalism

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman’s “Introduction to Philosophy.”

Religion

Dr. King records a definition of religion from Wieman and Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Education (Its Weakness in the Moral Realm)

Dr. King documents two quotes from St. Augustine's "Confessions." Both quotes address Augustine's view on education and how it affects one's relationship with God and other human beings.

Prophet

Dr. King defines prophet.

Philosopher (definition)

Dr. King quotes poet William Wordsworth's definition of a philosopher.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion."

Class Notes: Obadiah

Dr. King writes about the book of Obadiah and knowledge.

Man: Origin, Limitations and Freedom

Dr. King quotes Bible passages that explore the value of man, the limitations of man, the relationship between soul and body, and the origin of man.

Ezekiel and Sin

Dr. King paraphrases the biblical verse Ezekiel 20:21. He states that the prophet makes it clear that among the greatest sins of the Israelites was "profaning the Sabbath."

Religion

Dr. King quotes Borden Parker Bowne. The first name Gordon on the note card is incorrect.

Selfishness

Dr. King cites Schopenhauer's book "The World as Will and Ideas" and records a passage on selfishness.

William E. Channing

Dr. King references theologian William E. Channing regarding his views on "Unitarian Christianity."

Materialism

Dr. King quotes Hugh Elliott’s “Modern Science and Materialism.”

Extreme Unction

Dr. King defines extreme unction from the perspective of the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthadox church.

Spirit of Law[s]

Dr. King summarizes “The Spirit of the Laws,” written by Montesquieu, a political philosopher of the Enlightenment period.

God

Dr. King quotes Plato's views regarding God.

Christianity

Through quoting an unknown Christian, Dr. King calls for modern Christians to accept a personal challenge that will one day enable historians to declare that it was Christianity that held the world together.

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