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Barth

Dr. King writes on Barth's stance on the authoritative values of the Bible "in the tradition of Calvin."

Letter from William O. Miller to MLK

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Mr. Miller expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his recent endorsement of "Teachers Concerned," a local initiative in Philadelphia. He concludes by expressing wishes that Dr. King continues to be blessed in his efforts to "remove all racial lines of demarcation."

Sunday, February 18, 1968

Albany Movement Position Paper

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This paper states that segregation is both unconstitutional and immoral. It calls for a face-to-face meeting with the Albany, Georgia City Commission to discuss disposition of cases against the Albany Movement and a commitment to the First Amendment right of peaceful protest; clarification of the city’s position on the recent Interstate Commerce Commission ruling and desegregation of the city’s buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to recommend a timetable for desegregating lunch counters, the library, schools, and parks.

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

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This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

Thursday, August 1, 1963

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

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While in Ghana, Mr. John Lewis congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Lewis states, "the Nobel Peace Prize Committee had no choice but to select you for such an honor."

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Letter from Septima Clark to MLK

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Ms. Clark writes Dr. King with excitement about her granddaughter's accomplishment as a tutor. After saving her earnings of $5.00 per week, Ms. Clark's granddaughter managed to purchase Dr. King a holiday gift complete with special wrapping.

Friday, December 22, 1967

Letter from MLK to Edmond G. Jeffries

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Dr. King responds to Edmond Jeffries' letter regarding the benefit of the address that Dr. King gave at the Chicago Sunday Evening Club.

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Telegram from Linda Gortmaker to MLK

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Linda Gortmaker requests an interview with Dr. King for the Proviso West Profile.

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

Letter from Samuel Newman to MLK

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Samuel Newman requests that Dr. King's recent address made in New York on Vietnam. Dr. Newman also provides a contribution for Dr. King's "noble activities".

Friday, April 7, 1967

Letter from Derrick Cameron to MLK

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Derrick Cameron, a seventh grade student, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his fight in Civil Rights. In addition, Cameron offers to make copies on his ditto machine; a low-volume printing method used mainly by schools and churches.

Thursday, January 20, 1966

Out of the Long Night of Segregation

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Missions Magazine published various articles concerning the baptist ministry and how the church is impacting its surrounding community. Dr. King contributed to the magazine by writing an article entitled "Out of the Long Night of Segregation." In the article, he writes about the nonviolent methods being used to end segregation in America.

Saturday, February 1, 1958

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Bolt Culbertson

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Dora McDonald informs Culbertson that Dr. King is grateful for the invitation to speak at a South Carolina fundraiser for the families of Medgar Evers and the children killed in the Birmingham church bombing, but will be unable to attend. Miss McDonald refers Culbertson to contact Roy Wilkins of the NAACP to be a possible keynote speaker.

Tuesday, January 7, 1964

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

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Harry Belafonte expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. King for appearing with him on the "Tonight Show." Harry Belafonte concludes by thanking Dr. King for his friendship and for giving his time so generously.

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Letter from the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch to MLK

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Ulf Sviden, Chairman of the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch, sends Dr. King a congratulatory letter for his Nobel Peace Prize Award and an invitation to speak to the students of Stockholm.

Monday, November 16, 1964

Letter from MLK to Mr. A. Fouche

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Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Fouche's hospitality during his visit to the Bay Area.

Wednesday, February 6, 1963

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

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Frazer Earle, a member of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews Inc., extends Dr. King a second invitation to their Annual Banquet. Mr. Earle informs Dr. King that his acceptance to this invitation will allow him to meet with the students, the press, the religious community, and businessmen.

Monday, November 16, 1964

Letter of Support from Dorothy Hill to MLK

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Miss Dorothy P. Hill writes this letter to Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where do we go From Here: Chaos or Community?" As previous Director of the Summer Institute for Social Progress at Wellesley College, Hill learned that "skin color seems no bar to congeniality," and she knows of many others who have had similar positive experiences. Hill writes that she admires Dr. King for his principles and leadership ability.

Saturday, July 1, 1967

The Museum of Negro History and Art 1967 Calendar

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Distributed by the Museum of Negro History and Art, this calendar was used by Coretta Scott King and contains biographies of famous African American musicians. Mrs. King studied at the New England Conservatory to be an opera singer. On this calendar, she also marked April 27th as "my birthday."

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Letter from MLK to Senator J. Glenn Bealll

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Dr. King thanks Senator J. Glenn Beall for supporting the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Monday, June 22, 1964

Citation for MLK

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This document contains the passage read on the occasion of the conferral of an honorary doctoral degree from University of Bridgeport to Dr. King.

Sunday, June 4, 1961

"Discerning the Signs of History"

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Dr. King believes that there are lessons in understanding the process of history, that evil carries the seed of destruction and that militarism is ultimately suicidal. Dr. King states that "history teaches the lesson that all reality hinges on moral foundations."

Sunday, November 15, 1964

Letter from Dora to Joan

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In this letter, Dora McDonald sends a photograph to Joan Daves.

Friday, February 24, 1967

Letter from Bill Daniels to Dora McDonald

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Bill Daniels, the editorial cartoonist for WSB Radio and Television, responded to a letter he received from Ms. Dora McDonald concerning a cartoon. He suggested that she have her television adjusted, as the cartoon is "by no means a negro."

Monday, October 2, 1967

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Horace Bushnell"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Christian

Dr. King defines the Christian personality accroding the John McConnachie.

Black is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful To Be Black

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This staff newsletter "Black Is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful," published by the SCLC, explains the upcoming events that the organization has in store. The newsletter communicates as to who acquired new positions within the SCLC and speaks to how the SCLC wishes to continue with projects based in Chicago, Cleveland, and Washington through Operation Breadbasket.

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Nature and Perception

Dr. King discusses his philosophical perspective on perception and nature.

Letter from Edna R. McKinnon to MLK

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Edna McKinnon praises Dr. King for his wonderful work with the SCLC and its effect on the "entire world." She agrees with Dr. King's nonviolent philosophy and approach to American military intervention in Vietnam. Ms. McKinnon is the sister of Jeanette Rankin, the first woman of Congress, and the only member to vote against U.S. entry into both world wars.

Thursday, December 14, 1967

Photograph Outline for "Why We Can't Wait"

This draft outlines the images and captions used in Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait." Some of the material incorporated includes images and descriptions of Dr. King at the 1963 March on Washington, the Birmingham Campaign, other heavily involved civil rights leaders, and Dr. King's family.

Christian Social Philosophy II

An outline briefly explains T.S. Eliot's opinion on culture and how it pertains to religion, specifically Christianity. Notes taken on the side of the outline insinuate that Western culture is beginning to disintegrate because the values it was built on are decreasing in importance.

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