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Anonymous Letter to MLK

An unknown author questions Dr. King about his leadership and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. He references various racial, political, and social events, and stresses that Dr. King is responsible for all the riots, violence and looting.

Citizenship Education Proposal

SCLC's Citizenship Education Program issues a five year proposal for the period between 1965 and 1970. The proposal outlines previous successful activities since the inception of the program.

Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Highlander Reports: Black Power in Mississipi

In this newsletter, the writers speak about various issues concerning African Americans and their discrimination in politics.

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.

Letter from Arnold S. Zander to MLK

Mr. Zander, President of United World Federalists, invites Dr. King to serve on the organization's National Advisory Board.

Letter from Atlantiv Human Resources to MLK

The officers of Atlantic Human Resources invite Dr. King to be the guest of honor and main speaker at their second Annual Meeting.

Letter from Jitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Jitsuo Morikawa, Secretary for Evangelism at the American Baptist Jubilee Advance, asks Dr. King to address the organization's Evangelism Luncheon in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

The Baptist Pacifist Fellowship confirms that Dr. King will speak at its upcoming annual meeting. Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Fellowship, also encloses a brochure about the organization.

Letter from MLK to Lillian M. Robertson

Dr. King writes Lillian Robertson acknowledging receipt of her letter inviting him to speak at the annual meeting of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship in Atlantic City. The Reverend closes by stating it will be after the first of the year before he can make a definite commitment.

Letter from MLK to Lillian Robertson

Dr. King apologizes for his late reply to Lillian Robertson of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship, a division of the American Baptist Convention. He informs Mrs. Robertson that he will be preaching for the American Baptist Convention as a whole, so he will be unable to speak to the Fellowship in a smaller setting.

Letter fromJitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Jituso Morikawa expresses his delight that Dr. King will make an attempt to alter his schedule to speak in Atlantic City to the American Baptist Jubilee Advance.

People to People: Something Happening in Mississippi

In this article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, a group of Negroes from Mississippi who displayed the power of nonviolence by challenging the seating of the state's all-white regular Democratic delegation at the 1964 Democratic Convention.

Primer For Delegates to the Democratic National Convention

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party informs citizens of the mistreatment incurred by African Americans attempting to register to vote and participate in election process. The Party also outlines its journey to sending 64 delegates to the Democratic Convention of 1964 and how President Johnson denied them seats at the Convention.

SCLC Newsletter: April - May 1964

This second volume of the SCLC Newsletter includes a wide variety of articles on the organization's recent interests and activities. The feature article reports the success of the historic Selma to Montgomery march, and other articles touch on the SCLC's efforts to register new voters.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

The Stresses of the White Female Worker in the Civil Rights Movement in the South

Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint describes social and psychological stresses that white female civil rights workers encounter in both their living and working conditions in the American South in the 1960's.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.