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"BRAZIL"

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Cable from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Payment

This cable from J. Campe to Dr. King references payment by Editora Senzala Ltd. for the Portuguese-language rights to "Why We Can't Wait."

Convocation on Equal Justice Under the Law

This is a transcript of remarks made by Dr. King at the Convocation on Equal Justice Under Law, sponsored by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund on May 28, 1964.

Current Magazine

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Declaration of Independence by MLK

Dr. King writes an article making reference to the Emancipation Proclamation, President Lincoln, and the historical impact they both have had on the economy and what is described to be a social revolution. It is noted that this article is intended for a December, 1962 issue of a publication.

Invitation From L. Rosenberger to MLK

The First International Congress of Negro Culture invites Dr. King to their conference in Brazil.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Letter from Douglas Elleby to MLK

The Governor of Brazil, Adhemar de Barros, congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Governor Barros expounds on what the Nobel Peace Prize stirred in the Brazilian nation. Sao Paulo, the larges city in Brazil, aspires to form a sense of fellowship with Dr. King and extend the appropriate honors for a man of peace.

Letter from Dr. Alvaro Palmeira to MLK

Dr. Palmeira, Grand Master of the Grande Orient of Brazil, offers his congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Earl M. Smith to MLK

Earl Smith requests an answer from Dr. King about his invite to speak in Montevideo, Uruguay.

Letter from Earl Smith to MLK

Earl M. Smith, on behalf of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, requests permission from Dr. King to translate and publish a Portuguese edition of "Strength to Love."

Letter from Earl Smith to MLK about Portugeese Translation of "Strength to Love"

Earl M. Smith writes to Dr. King requesting permission to translate and publish the book "Strength to Love" in Portuguese. Mr. Smith states that a Fellowship of Reconciliation representative can be responsible for translating.

Letter from Eva Ban to MLK

Eva Ban, of the Brazilian newspaper "Cruzeiro," requests an interview with Dr. King in order to do a story on American race relations. Ban also asserts that there is no racism or discrimination in Brazil.

Letter from George Altman to MLK

George Altman informs Dr. King that one of his friends purchased a recording of Dr. King's speech entitled "The Great March to Freedom" and inquires about receiving the text of the speech.

Letter from Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Hildegard Goss-Mayr, Secretary for the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invites Dr. King to speak at a conference in Brazil.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Joan Daves to Earl Smith

In this letter, a representative of Dr. King's literary work, replies to Pastor Earl M. Smith regarding Smith's interest in having the F.O.R. Committee in Rio de Janeiro, collaborate on the Portuguese printing of "Strength to Love."

Letter from John Coventry Smith to MLK

John Coventry Smith, a member of the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., invites Dr. King to Brazil to speak at the Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary during his tenure in the South American country. Mr. Smith asserts that Dr. King's appearance is of importance to the young potential leaders of Brazil. Dr. King will further enlighten the Protestants in Brazil of the Christian faith to the racial issues in the United States.

Letter from John M. Thornton to MLK

John M. Thorton invites Dr. King to speak at the Citizenship Award Banquet hosted by the National Capital Voters Association, in order to encourage the 425,000 Negro citizens of Washington, DC to vote in the upcoming presidential election.

Letter from L. M. McCoy to MLK

The Board of Missions of the Methodist Church, on behalf of the Methodist Church of Brazil, invites Dr. King to speak at the centennial celebration of Methodist missionary work in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. McCoy also provides a brief history of the Methodist Church of Brazil.

Letter from Marilyn Sauer to MLK

Marilyn Sauer, Administrative Assistant to Dr. L. M. McCoy, provides Dr. King with the address of the Archbishop of Recife. Sauer also informs Dr. King of the proper way to address the Archbishop.

Letter from MLK to Adhemar de Barros

Dr. King declines Governor Adhemar de Barros' invitation to attend the conference for recognition of Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. King's work on the Right-to-Vote Campaign in the State of Alabama has monopolized his time for several months.

Letter from MLK to E. Weidner

Dr. King informs Mrs. E. Weidner that Negroes have enjoyed positions of respect and prestige in non-Negro nations. He cites several examples in history to this statement.

Letter from MLK to Sr. Joao Carlos Meirelles

Dr. King informs Sr. Meirelles that prior commitments regarding the Right-to-Vote Campaign in Alabama preclude his ability to attend the conference in Brazil.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Letter from Robert S. Swann to MLK

This letter to Dr. King accompanies the enclosure of a proposal regarding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Co-operative Association. Robert Swann hopes that this proposal can be discussed at the upcoming SCLC meeting in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Silvio Romoaldo to MLK

Silvio Romoaldo sends Dr. King his support for the Civil Rights Movement and the efforts against the Vietnam War.

Letter from T. Watson Street to MLK

After being informed of Dr. King's visit to Brazil in the summer of 1965, T. Watson Street invites him to a meeting of Presbyterian churches sponsored by the Division of Overseas Ministries of the National Council of Churches of Christ in America or the Evangelical Federation of Brazil.

List of Persons Invited to the Advisory Board for World Government

This document lists seven international figures who were invited to take a seat on the Advisory Board for World Government.

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