Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Brooklyn, NY"

An Appeal by Puerto Ricans for Fair Treatment

This document reviews the economic, political, and cultural disparity of Puerto Ricans. The authors explain the history of American imperialism in Puerto Rico and how Puerto Ricans have been mistreated in the United States, particularly in New York. Criticizing the Vietnam War, the authors suggest focusing the funding used abroad on community building.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report

This document contains the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report. Randolph T. Blackwell, former program director of the SCLC is now director of the Southern Rural Action Project.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Annual Report, 1955-1956

This report contains vital information concerning the organizational structure, services, and members of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. Dr. King provides a heartfelt address to the Montgomery, AL congregation as he seeks to extend the church's influence throughout the community amidst his growing involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Dr. King Announces Appointments in SCLC Operation Breadbasket

Dr. King announces two major appointments to the SCLC Operation Breadbasket staff. Reverend Jesse Jackson is named National Director and Reverend Calvin Morris is named Associate Director in Chicago. Operation Breadbasket was formed in 1962 to improve economic conditions in black communities throughout the US.

Facing Life's Inescapables

Dr. King uses an allegory regarding life to express that if an individual follows God's plan they will live an abundantly happy life.

Invitation from Frederick Williams to MLK

Frederick Williams, Director of the New York City Board of Education, asks Dr. King to appear as a guest speaker on the board's new television station, WNYC-TV.

Letter Dated 2/1/63 from Frank Elliott to MLK

Frank Elliot is writing to notify Dr. King that he has received the revised sermon "Antidotes of Fear," and it will be in the galley proofs. Elliot states that the galley proofs will be sent to Dr. King's office no later than Feburary 7th. He wants to meet with Dr. King to discuss any problems that may arise.

Letter from Alma Weil to MLK

Alma Weil expresses deep intolerance for prejudice and further discloses a desire to support Dr. King's efforts.

Letter from Berta Reller to MLK

Berta Reller writes a letter to Dr. King regarding an article she has enclosed. The letter discusses recent riots and that extremists from the left and right wings are motivating them. Reller believes that there should be more focus on education.

Letter from Cryssana Jenkins Bogner to MLK

Mrs. Cryssana Jenkins Bogner writes Dr. King with to both support his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, and to share her discontent with Executive Director of the NAACP Roy Wilkin's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Solomon Mendelson

In this response letter to Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom in New York, Miss McDonald explains that Dr. King will make all efforts to attend the "I Have a Dream" musical performance.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edith Segal

Dora McDonald communicates to Edith Segal that she has be referred to the letter addressed originally to Bernard Lee. Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Segal that Dr. King is unable to comment on her book due to his consistent traveling endeavors in the South for the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marie Freckelton

Dora McDonald sends acknowledgement of the receipt of a letter and photograph on behalf of Dr. King to Marie Freckelton.

Letter from Emily A. Fortson to MLK

Ms. Fortson requests Dr. King contact her immediately regarding a press release to announce his upcoming pilgrimage. She informs Dr. King that both Jews and Arabs have shown "intense interest" in the trip.

Letter from Gardner Taylor to MLK

Rev. Gardner C. Taylor sends a financial contribution to the SCLC on behalf of the Progressive National Baptist Convention.

Letter from Harper & Brothers to MLK

Eugene Exman sends Dr. King a review of "Stride Toward Freedom" from the New York Times. He also mentions recent orders for the book and planned efforts to increase sales.

Letter from Harry H. Kruener to MLK

Rev. Kruener invites Dr. King to speak at Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims in 1963 to commemorate the church's designation as a national landmark.

Letter from Isac Anderson to MLK

Isac Anderson is requesting help from Dr. King in regards to obtaining a higher education. Anderson was forced to withdraw from school due to interfernece and his inability to concentrate. He hopes that with Dr. King's help he will be able to resolve this issue.

Letter from John O. Killens to MLK About a Book Party

In this letter, Killens discusses the possibility of a book party in Dr. King's honor. Killens, Ruby Dee, Lofton Mitchell, Ossie Davis, and Harry Belafonte are exploring this idea and believe that at this event many books would be sold and the message of civil rights could be communicated to thousands.

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

In this letter, Joseph Clark shows appreciation for the work Dr. King has done.

Letter from Leonard Newell to MLK

Leonard A. Newell writes to Dr. King to ask for his opinion about the pursuit of a consumer strike to protest the War in Vietnam.

Letter from Manie Callahan to MLK

Manie Callahan expresses her admiration to Dr. King and informs him of the passing of her parents which left her with a five bedroom apartment. Callahan understands the lack of opportunity for Negroes in the south and offers her home to a deserving married couple looking for work. She trusts Dr. King's judgment of character and hopes to hear from him soon.

Letter from Marshall Breland to MLK

Marshall Breland, a student from P.S. 200, requests information from Dr. King for the purposes of a school related assignment. Breland deems Dr. King "The Non-Violent Crusader".

Letter from Martha Johnson to MLK

Martha Johnson invites Dr. King to be a member of the John Brown Memorial Association, which is dedicated to the memory of its first freedom rider.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

Letter from MLK to Gertrude Corbett

Dr. King thanks Miss Corbett for her message regarding the SCLC Chicago Campaign. He agrees with Miss Corbett's view that the current Negro dilemma is rooted in multiple causes. He also discusses standards of living, economic conditions and society as a whole.

Letter from MLK to Heinz Ehrlick

Dr. King thanks Mr. Ehrlick for his encouraging letter and suggestions.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Bodo Charles Ohly

Dr. King writes Mr. Bodo Ohly regarding the new stanza he wrote to the National Anthem.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. James L. Fenner

Dr. King thanks Mrs. James L. Fenner and the faculty members of P. S. 155 for their moral and financial support.

Letter from MLK to Thomas Harten

Dr. King writes to Rev. Harten of the Holy Trinity Baptist Church to thank him and his organization for the donation of one thousand dollars. He explains how the money will be used throughout the SCLC and the importance of having support from organizations who help contribute to the Civil Rights Movement.

Pages