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A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."

A Journey of Conscience

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

A Proposal for Unity Day

Joseph Polowsky composed a proposal to present to the United Nations for the creation of an April 25th holiday, to be known as Unity Day. This holiday is in commemoration of a conference of the war-time allied nations in San Francisco.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Anonymous Card and Article to MLK

An anonymous sender encloses an article written about Dr. King and his anti-Vietnam War sentiments.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer sends a letter to Dr. King and several other civil rights leaders. Although the exact message of the letter is unclear, the writer quotes numerous Biblical passages and Christian prayers. The writer, intermittently, also refers to the recipient as "Michael."

Beyond Vietnam

In Dr. Kings Beyond Vietnam address, he discusses seven major reasons for bringing Vietnam into "a field of moral vision," five things that the government should do to remove itself from conflict with Vietnam, the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam, and Premier Diem. Dr. King also encourages those in the churches and the synagogues to speak out against the war in Vietnam.

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Civil Rights and Vietnam

An avid supporter urges Dr. King to divert his attention to the War in Vietnam. He asserts "This war will force Chinese and Russian to interfere and may further expand into thermonuclear war..."

Current Magazine

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Face the Nation Interview

This is a transcript of an August 1965 interview of Dr. King on the CBS television news program Face the Nation. King is asked to comment on numerous issues facing American society including the conflict in Vietnam, civil rights, housing and birth control.

Facing the Challenge of a New Life

Dr. King uses Greek Philosophy, the Christian conception of agape love, and the need for nonviolent resistance as a guideline of "Facing the Challenge of a New Life" in America. Throughout the sermon, he encourages African Americans to remain committed to the nonviolent principles of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the precepts of Christian living to facilitate the birth of a new way of life in an America dealing with violent conflicts over social conditions.

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.

Food & Allied World Crises: Is There A Solution?

This document is a composition of several articles addressing the global state of food consumption and production.

Hungry Club Speech

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

Invitation to Dr. King from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs

Dr. King is invited to take part in the 1967 13th Annual World Conference of the Japan Council against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs.

Let's Be Human

Long time civil rights agitator Harry Fleischman wrote this syndicated column for the American Jewish Committee's National Labor Service. Articles within the column took a humorous and often irreverent view of social and civil rights issues around the globe. Fleischman was also the national secretary of the Socialist Party USA from 1942-50.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from Audrey Mizer to MLK

Audrey Mizer encourages Dr. King to continue his good works because "the world cannot be robbed of any good." Mizer then discusses her opposing views to a statement in a Christian Monitor Column regarding Red China's admission to the United Nations.

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

Letter from Benjamin F. Smith to the Editor of Detroit Free Press

In a letter to the editor of the Detroit Free Press, Benjamin Smith criticizes US involvement in Vietnam. He advocates ending the war as 80% of South Vietnamese people want peace, while 67% of Americans "favor a rough war."

Letter from Carey B. Joynt to Rev. Carroll D. Payne

In this letter, dated June 20, 1967, Carey Joynt asks Rev. Carroll Payne to review her rough draft regarding the Vietnam War and Ramsey's ideas. She has simplified the arguments to the best of her abilities and hopes that Payne can offer suggestions for her draft.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to Dora McDonald

Carey McWilliams writes Dora McDonald acknowledging confirmation of Dr. King's commitment to speak for "The Nation's" conference in Los Angeles.

Letter from CB Gilless to MLK

Mr. Gilless writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed petition to establish a 'World Government'. He beckons "Just how much better than the American free public do you think the world government will be?" He requests an immediate rebuttal.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to Mr. Paul Harvey

Charles Waring presents ways to prevent the spread of communism around the world. He also questions previous decisions by the United States government and speculates how the outcome would have been different in various conflicts.

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