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"Chattanooga, TN"

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Flyer for SCLC Mass Meeting

This flyer advertises a 1958 Norfolk, VA SCLC mass meeting.

Letter from Benjamin E. Smith to MLK

This report highlights a Birmingham conference on the "Ways and Means to Integrate the Deep South" sponsored by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. This conference included several hundred white and black leaders who sought to integrate the South.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Bill Green

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Bill Green that Dr. King is on an extended lecture tour at the moment. She ensures Mrs. Green that the letter and poem sent will receive his attention upon his return.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Major J. Jones wishes to confirm Dr. King's speaking engagement at the Jobs and Freedom Conference in Chattanooga, Tennessee on November 13, 1963.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Major J. Jones writes to Dr. King, offering to host the SCLC's Annual Spring Board Meeting in Chattanooga, where he is a district superintendent of the Methodist Church. Mr. Jones mentions that having the SCLC in Chattanooga would help the city. However, Dr. King couldn't accept Mr. Jones' invitation due to prior arrangements to host the 1965 SCLC Spring Board Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Mr. Jones, on behalf of the Council for Co-operative Action, invites Dr. King to speak at their function in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Letter from MLK to Rev. William A. Dennis

Dr. King requests the presence of Reverend Dennis at a SCLC Executive Board meeting in Atlanta, GA. Reverend Dennis responds by stating he will not be able to attend, but he will send someone in his place.

Letter from Mrs. Bill Green to MLK

Mrs. Bill Green, an uneducated white woman, informs Dr. King on the spiriutal words she has recieved from God. Mrs. Green asserts that she recieved this insight after she envisioned the struggle Dr. king has endured. She lists four ideas surrounding the lack of collectivity amongst the races and the acknowledgment of the power of prayer.

Letter from Ted Mercer Jr. to MLK

Mr. Mercer requests materials to promote Dr. King's candidacy in the "Choice '68" mock election program on the Bryan College campus. He also relays an invitation from the student body vice president asking Dr. King to speak on campus.

Loving Your Enemies

Dr. King interprets Jesus' command to "love your enemies" and outlines how to accomplish this goal. He closes this sermon by relating the philosophy of love to the use of nonviolence as a means to overcome oppression.

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

People In Action : "Birmingham Part 2"

Dr. King, along with the SCLC, devises a plan to stop government officials from shutting down public facilities. Dr. King goes on to discuss the racism in Albany and plans to generate peace with the white communities.

SCLC Financial Report

Ralph D. Abernathy releases the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Annual Fiscal Report for 1962-1963.

SCLC Newsletter: April 1962

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces five new members will join the staff. The five men are: John H. Calhoun, Herbert V. Coulton, James L. Bevel, Fred C. Bennette, and Bernard S. Lee. These men derive from different locations across America and add different levels of education and commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. Jones to MLK

Dr. and Mrs. Jones congratulate Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. They send their regrets for not being able to attend the dinner to honor Dr. King's accomplishment.

Telegram From M. J. Jones to MLK

Mr. Jones, Chattanooga affiliate of the SCLC, writes a support letter to Dr. King while he is in jail.

The Story of Snick

"From Freedom High to Black Power," by Gene Roberts, describes the opposing views voiced by SNCC and Dr. King regarding the civil rights movement. SNCC asserts a message of violence and black power, while Dr. King promotes a philosophy of love and nonviolence.