Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"GUATEMALA"

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK encluding copy of British magazine SLANT

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has enclosed a copy of the British magazine SLANT that has a shortened version of his Riverside Church address inside.

Letter from Robert S. Swann to MLK

This letter to Dr. King accompanies the enclosure of a proposal regarding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Co-operative Association. Robert Swann hopes that this proposal can be discussed at the upcoming SCLC meeting in Washington, D.C.

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

"Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam" is a sermon Dr. King delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967 in Atlanta. In this draft of the sermon, Dr. King references a previous speech, "Beyond Vietnam," that he delivered to the group "Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam" at Riverside Baptist Church in New York City.