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Letter from David S. Tillson MLK

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Dr. Davis S. Tillson congratulates Dr. King on his statement regarding foreign policy.

Friday, May 5, 1967

Lifts to Living

Nanny H. Burroughs sends a short book entitled "Here and Beyond - The Sunset" with her signature and tag line to wish Dr. King a glorious New Year. The book contains a list of inspirational songs, parables, and poems regarding the process of life and spiritual encouragement.

Telegram from MLK to Mr. Sylveter A. Okereke

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Dr. King regrettably informs Mr. Okereke that he will be unable to accept his invitation for an event held on August 18, 1965.

Friday, August 6, 1965

"Question of Credibility"

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In this article, the author highlights and questions the credibility of The Child Development Group, which was created to assist in educating the youth of Mississippi.

Sunday, October 16, 1966

Transition Period

Dr. King quotes an unknown source that links the transition period to Alfred North Whitehead’s rejection of his earlier view about science and philosophy.

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

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Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

Monday, November 2, 1964

Negro Leaders' Mistakes Hurting Civil Rights

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In this article, David Lawrence explains his dissatisfaction with "Negro leaders" for supporting the actions of Adam Clayton Powell, who in Lawrence's mind, has abused his office and trust.

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Letter to MLK from the Lutheran Standard Regarding Publishing

In this letter, George H. Muedeking, the editor of The Lutheran Standard, inquires if his publication can publish an advertisement of Dr. King's that was in The New York Times.

Letter from V.R. Hardy to MLK

V.R. Hardy lectures Dr. King regarding his methods of obtaining equality. He asserts that such methods will only result in a race of people wallowing in self-pity. Hardy cites the long-term oppression of Jews as a case in point of how to overcome the tragedies of the past.

Integrating Classes

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This article discusses Harold Howe II's opinion regarding segregated schools and his work towards integration. Howe asserts that segregation is bad for anyone concerned, such as minorities, poor kids, whites, or blacks.

Friday, August 12, 1966

Letter from MLK to H. A. Cruse

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Dr. King extends support to H. A. Cruse, an individual whose constitutional rights were violated. Dr. King emphasizes that it is not just Negroes who have been "subjected to victimization resulting from failure of Southern law enforcement authorities to follow constitutional practices."

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

Follow Me

Dr. King outlines a sermon. "Follow Me" and "The Call of Christ" are considered as possible titles.

Telegram from MLK to the Honorable Carl Sanders

Dr. King invites the Honorable Carl Sanders to share the pulpit with himself and Mayor Ivan Allen at the Annual Layman's Day celebration at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He also invites him to a dinner to honor Governor Nelson Rockefeller at the home of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Relation Between Esthetics and Science

Dr. King writes notes regarding "The Relation Between Esthetics and Science." King cites several philosophers, psychologists, and scientists, and their different theories regarding science, mathematics, art, and esthetics.

Telegram from Curtis W. Harris to Dora McDonald

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Curtis Harris, President of the Virginia State unit of the SCLC, asks Miss McDonald to confirm some scheduled dates that have been previously discussed with Dr. King.

Monday, April 5, 1965

MLK Address at the Georgia State Capitol Regarding Julian Bond

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Dr. King delivers this speech at the State Capitol of Georgia protesting the legislation refusal to seat black politician Julian Bond. King calls this a "grave injustice" particularly since the state legislature of Georgia considers itself protecting the United States Constitution. Dr. King points out the irony of this act and exposes other irresponsible actions of the legislature.

Friday, January 14, 1966

Letter from Tommy Wilkins to Dora McDonald

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Tommy Wilkins writes Dora McDonald to inquire about a book loaned to Dr. King during his attendance at Emory University. Wilkins then requests its return and extends his best wishes to the SCLC for their work in Albany.

Tuesday, August 28, 1962

Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

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In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Saturday, August 1, 1964

Award Letter from Stanley Faulkner to the SCLC

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Stanley Faulkner, Chairman of the Edward K. Barsky Fund writes to convey the fund's admiration for the valuable work the SCLC puts forward in the field of civil rights. As a result of SCLC's efforts the fund makes a sizable contribution in the amount of $500 for which they requested no publicity be given.

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Letter from Roger Threats to Mrs. King

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Roger Threats, a student from New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King death. In the letter, Threats describes his own dream, which is an end to fighting.

Friday, April 5, 1968

Mastering Ourselves

"Mastering Ourselves" is Dr. King's exploration of the inner struggle for good and evil that occurs within every human's experience. Dr. King asserts that this "dualism" can sometimes cause good people to do bad things and bad people to do good things. According to Dr. King, this can only be overcome through identifying and replacing one's own weaknesses. He also suggests finding a profitable way to use leisure time coupled with a devotional life and continuous prayer.

Statement by MLK

Dr. King discusses the backlash received during the protests and demonstrations for civil rights. He asserts that nonviolence is the most successful weapon, and that in order to participate the individual must be bold, brave, and disciplined.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

In this draft telegram, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to President Kennedy for the Executive Order outlawing discrimination in all federally assisted housing.

MLK Speaks Before the NAACP at Winston-Salem

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This program for the Winston-Salem branch of the NAACP highlights Dr. King as the guest speaker.

Sunday, October 15, 1961

Letter From Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Annual Report

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In this letter, Mays informs Dr. King that an Annual Report will arrive soon.

Friday, April 21, 1967

Letter from Mrs. R. E. Rufenacht to MLK

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Mrs. Rufenacht thanks Dr. King for his support of white workers who requested his help. She also encloses a contribution for the work of the SCLC.

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Letter From Elizabeth Green to MLK

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Elizabeth Green informs Dr. King of the news stories covering his appearance at Mount Holyoke College and encloses copies of the stories.

Monday, October 28, 1963

Letter Regarding the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition

A letter drafted by Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph, co-Chairmen of the Urban Coalition. includes article clippings from various newspapers discussing the dire need for public service employment, private employment, educational disparities, reconstruction and urban development, and equal housing opportunities.

Emergency Rally--Walk with Dr. Spock for Peace in Vietnam

The following document is promoting a rally for peace in Vietnam. Dr. Benjamin Spock, among others, is scheduled to speak at the rally.

Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

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Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.

Monday, August 22, 1966

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