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"Lowndes County, AL"

American Foundation on Nonviolence

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Black Power: Two Views

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Dr. Abernathy Says Full Steam Ahead in '67

Dr. Abernathy recaps accomplishments of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for 1966. He states several objectives for the organization's efforts for 1967.

How Do You View the Progress in School Desegregation?

In this special for the New York Times, Dr. King shares his opinion on the progress made in desegregating schools.

Letter from Joe Johnson and Lewis Black to Robert Swann

Members of the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association send this letter of appreciation to the International Independence Institute.

Letter from Silas Norman to MLK

Silas Norman, State Project Director of the Alabama SNCC, writes Dr. King to inform him that they have not received a response from a past telegram inviting him to speak at a rally in Lowndes County, Alabama.

MLK Address to the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC

Dr. King, at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses numerous civil rights issues the organization is addressing throughout America.

Operation Freedom Helps In Selma

This document provides details about three specific individuals from Selma who were fired from their jobs after their employers learned of their participation in the Civil Rights Movement. Unemployed and on the verge of disaster, Operation Freedom stepped in and provided financial aid to the three individuals, to cover the cost of food, housing, transportation and medical care.

Rural Negros Start New Program

This press release from the SCLC informs the public that the self-help program of education for seasonal farm workers in Wilcox County, Alabama has officially opened. Along with the help of the federal office of Economic Opportunity, the SCLC wishes to create hope for neglected rural families. Also, to make this program a success, the antipoverty agency funded about $250 as well as a federal grant of $300 to help in financing this project.

SCLC News Bulletin

This SCLC bulletin to supporters details the organization's progress in numerous locations, including its growing presence in northern cities such as Cleveland, Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, and the Citizenship Education Program. A "Fiscal Facts" section stresses that Dr. King receives no salary from SCLC, nor any other income from his work with the organization.

Statement from the Commission on Civil Rights

Clarence H. Hunter issued this statement to share the news that the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights would be holding a public hearing in Montgomery, Alabama to collect information regarding the condition of African Americans in Alabama. Hunter states the purpose of the Commission's investigation and names the notable members of the investigation.

Telegram to MLK from H. Rap Brown

Police brutality in the black communities of Prattville, Alabama prompts this request sent to Dr. King, which seeks immediate federal investigation and protection of black prisoners.

The Story of Snick

"From Freedom High to Black Power," by Gene Roberts, describes the opposing views voiced by SNCC and Dr. King regarding the civil rights movement. SNCC asserts a message of violence and black power, while Dr. King promotes a philosophy of love and nonviolence.