Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"MEXICO"

Telegram from MLK to Terry Shaw

,

Dr. King telegrams Terry Shaw stating that the staff of SCLC sends their "deepest sympathy" in his time of grief.

Thursday, July 1, 1965

Letter from Debby Hopper to MLK

,

Debby Hopper, a 17-year-old from the Boston area, writes Dr. King to discuss prejudice in America and relates what she believes to be the hypocrisy of whites in her community. She also offers Dr. King words of encouragement in his fight for civil rights.

Sunday, May 26, 1963

Letter from John Lazenby to MLK

,

John Lazenby, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, encloses a donation to Dr. King. He further stresses that nonviolence is the prime method to solve problems around the world. Lazenby requests copies of Dr. King's anti-war speech delivered at New York's Riverside Church on April 4, 1967 to distribute to his friends.

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Letter from Isaac Franck to MLK

,

Issac Franck extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at Adas Israel. Adas Israel is the largest Conservative Congregation in the Greater Washington area.

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

Evil (Natural)

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson on the topic of evil.

Letter from MLK to Artist Committee for SCLC

,

This letter expresses Dr. King's regards and deep appreciation to the Artist Committee for their generous contribution. He communicates gratitude on behalf of so many who benefit from the work made possible from their support. Additionally, Dr. King communicates the continued strength and effectiveness of the SCLC in promoting negro-white unity, non-violence, justice and equality.

Friday, May 5, 1967

Notecard- Sin

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Augustine's view on sin.

The Church

Dr. King writes a note on the Church, calling it the "center of hope."

Letter from Robert Stock to MLK

,

Robert Stock sends Dr. King a copy of a magazine called "Petroleum Today." The magazine offers their audience public information about the oil industry as well as human interests including education, art, and history.

Thursday, April 21, 1966

Letter from Lenore Romney to Michigan State's Robert L. Green

,

Mrs. Lenore Romney, wife of Michigan Governor George Romney, expresses her disappointment to Robert L. Green about his perceived misreading of a Women's City Club article in the New York Times.

Friday, May 19, 1967

Spencer

Dr. King records a quote from Herbert Spencer’s “First Principles.”

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

,

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee. He calls for strong federal action in the South to prevent violence and to uphold the decisions of the Supreme Court pertaining to the end of segregation.

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Notre Dame Law School Library Letter to MLK

,

Miss Boller, the law school library assistant of Notre Dame, inquires about a recent speech by Dr. King concerning his perspective on the United States and violence.

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

SCLC Administrator Job Description

,

This document outlines the responsibilities of the role of an Administrator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Monday, August 29, 1966

Religion

Dr. King's focuses on religious beliefs and their relation to intellectual concepts.

Letter From Charles L. Sanders to MLK

,

In this letter, Sanders recommends William Rutherford to Dr. King for a position with SCLC.

Monday, July 18, 1966

Speeches by the Leaders

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

Letter from Sushil Joseph to MLK

,

Sushil Joseph, a student at the University of Denver, informs Dr. King of a term paper he is writing on the subject of "Church and the Race Relations." Joseph would like Dr. King to answer one of the questions he enclosed with this letter to aid him with his paper.

Friday, November 8, 1963

Brotherhood Cannot Be a Theory

,

This newspaper clipping of The Southern Israelite features segments on the Atlanta banquet honoring Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Given on his return to the States, there were twelve hundred and fifty Atlanta citizens in attendance. Included articles are: welcoming comments by Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, a tribute by Archbishop Paul Hallinan, and a transcription of Dr. King's speech.

Friday, February 19, 1965

Letter from W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. to MLK

,

W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. writes the SCLC enclosing a check from various church groups to be used toward Selma expenses.

Friday, July 30, 1965

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Alfred T. Davies

,

Dora McDonald informs Rev. Alfred T. Davies that Dr. King will not be able to submit a sermon for "The Church Speaks on Race." Dr. King has just published "Strength to Love," which includes his sermons on many of the aspects of the civil rights movement.

Monday, October 21, 1963

Letter from Bill Dady to MLK

,

In this letter, "Free Men and Free Markets," a book by Robert Theobald, is introduced to Dr. King by Bill Dady.

Tuesday, May 26, 1964

Letter from Ronald Segal to MLK

,

Mr. Segal expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's willingness to sponsor the International Conference on South Africa. He also requests that Dr. King prepare a short paper to deliver at the Conference.

Sunday, October 10, 1965

Letter to Martin Luther King Jr. from Clement Alexandre 1957

,

Dr. King received this letter from Doubleday & Company, regarding offering Dr. King royalties to write his first book. The owner/publisher of Doubleday, Clement Alexandre, tried to persuade Dr. King to work with them on a book that would expand his base of influence. The book would relate to issues of civil and political issues.

Friday, October 4, 1957

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald Regarding Dr. King's Biological Sketch

,

This letter from Robert L. Green, Associate Professor, Michigan State University to Dora McDonald is to request copy of Dr. King's biographical sketch to be forwarded to an individual at Yeshiva University. The biographical sketch will be used in conjunction with Dr. King's paper "The Role of Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement" which will be published in the American Psychological Association Journal and the Journal of Social Issues.

Monday, January 22, 1968

Letter from MLK to Mr. Yves Montand

,

Dr. King extends his gratitude for the "Palais des Sports" event in Paris, France which brought support financially for the movement. Dr. King stress the duality between France and America in the "total struggle."

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Telegram from Charles Hayes to to MLK

Charles Hayes, an official of the AFL-CIO, sends Dr. King best wishes for a "speedy recovery." He also thanks Dr. King for sending Ralph Abernathy to speak at a banquet held for the organization.

Letter from John Huston to MLK

,

Reverend John Huston of the East View United Church of Christ writes to Dr. King to express his appreciation for Operation Breadbasket. Huston calls this the most effective civil rights initiative he's ever had the pleasure of working on. He brings up three points that he would like to discuss with Dr. King, including how to better advocate for the Negroes' federally guaranteed rights.

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

,

Theodore Brown writes Dr. King requesting his signature on a telegram to President Johnson from the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa expressing disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and requesting U.S. support for turning over administration to the United Nations.

Friday, April 21, 1967

The Burning Truth in the South

This article reprinted from "The Progressive," details the discriminatory conditions experienced by blacks in the South and urges support in the nonviolent struggle for freedom and equality.

Pages