Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"MEXICO"

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

An Evening of Negro Culture and History

This booklet, entitled "Black is Beautiful and It's So Beautiful To Be Black," contains information from an SCLC event held August 16, 1967 that sought to explore Negro culture and history.

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Current Magazine

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

Friends Journal: A Quaker Weekly

Dr. King's article, "Nonviolence and Racial Justice" is included in this edition of the Friends Journal. Dr. King's entry discusses the various implications of race relations in America and the beneficial elements of nonviolence.

Lette from Morton Sobell to a Friend

Mrs. Sobell requests that Dr. King attend the open hearing for Morton Sobell. She also asks for financial support to aid in his defense.

Letter from A. S. Young to MLK

Mr. Young criticizes Dr. King and the black community for their support of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay's refusal to be drafted into the military. He also expresses worry about the quality of black leadership and urges a move from a selfish focus on Negroes only to concern for all people.

Letter From Andrew Young to Julian Bond

Mr. Young expresses his appreciation for Mr. Bond, a founding member of SNCC, social activist, and politician in the state of Georgia. He urges Mr. Bond to continue the fight for racial equality despite major adversities.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Letter from Arnold Aronson to Cooperating Organizations

Arnold Aronson writes cooperating organizations to ensure that following the March on Washington, the government delivers on the stipulations of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Dr. Mays informs Dr. King of his recommendation to confer an honorary degree from Morehouse College on Dr. J. Curtis Dixon. Mays includes a biographical sketch of Dr. Dixon and asks Dr. King to respond to the letter with his approval or disapproval.

Letter from Bob Detterick to MLK

Bob Detterick, chairman for "Choice '68" organization at Western New Mexico University, requests that Dr. King send poster, pictures, pamphlets to promote him as the next presidential candidate.

Letter from Carlos G. Randall to MLK

Carlos Randall writes Dr. King expressing that he once really liked him, but now he is unsure due to King's stance on Vietnam. He asserts "So now the USA is a purveyor of violence?" and asks if Dr. King believed that he would be able to give a similar speech in Moscow or Pekin and still freely receive his letter.

Letter from Chuck Mittlestadt to MLK

Mr. Miittlestadt praises Dr. King for utilizing the "Gandhian technique of Satygagraha" in the Civil Rights Movement. He relates Dr. King to Mahatma Gandhi and Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru. Mr. Mittlestadt also discusses the downfall of CORE, encloses a donation, and requests a photograph of Dr. King.

Letter from Clarence E. Duffy to MLK

Rev. Duffy expresses his religious and political concerns with Dr. King as he considers a potential presidential campaign in 1968.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Walker

Ms. McDonald writes to Mr. Walker and states that Dr. King will accept the invitation to speak at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Rutherford, New Jersey on 10/25/67.

Letter from Dr. Mircea Tanasescu to MLK

Dr. Tanasescu asks Dr. King to help him receive permission from the Romanian government, so that his family may enter the United States.

Letter from Effie Wilderson to MLK

Mrs. Wilderson writes to Dr. King informing him that the white Christian Church is in support of non-violence and equality for the Negro people.

Letter from Frank McRedmond to MLK

Frank McRedmond suggests that Dr. King consider using the term "the economic defenseless" rather than "the poor," in order to gain support from the white community.

Letter from John and Enid Howarth to Friends Soliciting Financial Support

Mr. and Mrs. Howarth of New Mexico express their disapproval of violence against Negroes in the South and request donations for a Fourth of July celebration in support of SCLC, SNCC and other civil rights groups.

Letter from Joseph T. Beaver to MLK

Joseph Beaver, Jr. sends his sympathy to Dr. King following the attempt on Dr. King's life. He had originally included a biography of Wendell Phillips Dabney.

Letter from Kenneth Lee to MLK

Kenneth Lee, President of the International Confederation of Disarmament and Peace, invites Dr. King to become a sponsor of the organization.

Letter from Loretta Abbott to MLK

Letter from Robert Pritchard to The Benjamin Franklin Institute

As a result of being investigated by Mr. Aguiliar, a staff member of the Benjamin Franklin Institute, Robert Pritchard, writes the director of the institute expressing his grievances. A carbon copy of this letter was sent to the National Headquaters, SCLC and NAACP.

Letter fromJitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Jituso Morikawa expresses his delight that Dr. King will make an attempt to alter his schedule to speak in Atlantic City to the American Baptist Jubilee Advance.

List of Colleges Participating in Choice "68 Requesting King Information

This list includes the names of fifty colleges and universities participating in the "Choice 68" pre-election presidential campaigns. An additional twenty-five institutions also invited Dr. King to participate in their "Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., for President" campaigns.

MLK Address at the Georgia State Capitol Regarding Julian Bond

Dr. King delivers this speech at the State Capitol of Georgia protesting the legislation refusal to seat black politician Julian Bond. King calls this a "grave injustice" particularly since the state legislature of Georgia considers itself protecting the United States Constitution. Dr. King points out the irony of this act and exposes other irresponsible actions of the legislature.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

MLK Press Conference in NYC

Dr. King speaks at a Press Conference to expresses his support for the boycotts occurring around the nation. He also stands in affirmation with the Olympic athletes who chose not to participate in the games due to the civil injustice taking place in America.

Pages