Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Missouri (MO)"

Telegram from Sen. Edward Kennedy to MLK

,

Senator and Mrs. Edward M. Kennedy congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Interview of MLK to Appear in PLAYBOY

,

On behalf of Dr. King, Secretary Dora McDonald responds to Thomas A. Johnson of The New York Times. She goes on to say that Dr. King accepts the invitation for an interview, that would appear in an upcoming issue of PLAYBOY Magazine.

Thursday, January 11, 1968

MLK's Final Exam for Social Philosophy

,

Dr. King's final exam for the Seminar in Social Philosophy class he taught at Morehouse College from 1961-1962.

Monday, May 28, 1962

Telegram from Jacob K. Javits to MLK

Amidst the confusion of varying interpretations, Senator Jacob K. Javits asks Dr. King to share his interpretation of the term "black power," so that it can serve as a guide to others.

Press Release for Catholic Interracial Council Award

,

The Catholic Interracial Council of Chicago announces that Dr. King will be awarded the John F. Kennedy Annual Award at their 1964 benefit dinner as a tribute to his leadership. According to polls published in Newsweek magazine, Dr. King's leadership was prized "more than any other single Negro."

Tuesday, August 11, 1964

The Suffering Servant

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 53 presents a different view of the servant from chapters 42, 49 and 50. The concept of God's servant evolved from that of Israel as a nation, to the spiritual or inner Israel, to an individual who would take up the work that the others would not. King concludes that the prophecy was fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth.

Social Ethics

Dr. King's references a chapter and verse from the biblical Book of Zephaniah. He notes that the passages concerning social phenomena such as infidelity, pride, selfishness and oppression are still "entirely up to date."

Letter from David H. Staley to MLK

,

David H. Staley agrees with the SCLC's stance on the Vietnam War.

Sunday, May 7, 1967

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

,

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

Monday, February 21, 1966

Letter from CB Gilless to MLK

,

Mr. Gilless writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed petition to establish a 'World Government'. He beckons "Just how much better than the American free public do you think the world government will be?" He requests an immediate rebuttal.

Saturday, January 13, 1962

Letter from Gladys Bilcher to MLK

,

Gladys Bilcher writes Dr. King expressing her enjoyment of one of Dr. King's speeches. This particular speech denouncing the war in Vietnam was given exactly one year before Dr. King's assassination on April 4, 1968.

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

,

Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Monday, October 30, 1967

Letter from Elmer Jordan Admonishing MLK

,

In this letter dated February 12, 1968, Elmer Jordan writes, "your ideas will cause your death because of your heart" as he advises Dr. King to refrain from his "threatening proposals.".

Monday, February 12, 1968

Letter from MLK to Dr. Seymour Siegel in Appreciation for Being Awarded an Honorary Degree

,

This letter from Dr. King to Dr. Seymour Siegel extends appreciation for being awarded an honorary degree from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.

Wednesday, July 3, 1968

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

,

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Invitation for the Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

This is an invitation for the Inauguration of the seventh president of Morehouse College.

Problem of Evil

Dr. King writes about the problem of evil according to the 10th chapter of Proverbs.

Letter from Froydis Kvaerk to MLK

,

Norwegian student Froydis Kvaerk requests a copy of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in fulfillment of a class assignment on Dr. King and the civil rights struggle.

Monday, August 29, 1966

The Citizenship Education Program

This newsletter serves as a platform for the Citizenship Education Program. The program is designed to help inform African Americans of their rights as citizens in the United States.

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

,

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Friday, May 26, 1961

MLK Fights For Peace

,

Included on page four of this Bedding, Curtain and Drapery Workers Union newsletter is an article regarding Dr. King's courageous efforts in helping Negros achieve equality, and the support he has received from the trade union. The union also supports Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam war, and agrees that the war is harming America's domestic programs against poverty.

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Segregation and Political Allegiance

Dr. King addresses segregation calling it "a house of prostitution built to perpetuate an illicit intercourse between injustice and immortality." He references James Meredith, the African American student who was prohibited from enrolling at the University of Mississippi because of his race, and encourages the Federal Government to exercise the force of the Constitution. He also asserts that African Americans must recognize the importance of voting and uniting with allies whose "interests are common with our own."

Letter from Moss Kendrix to MLK

,

Mr. Kendrix wishes to meet with Dr. King to discuss a certain rumor concerning him and the Coca-Cola Company.

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Letter from Pastor R. L. Crady to MLK

,

Pastor Crady expresses concern to Dr. King that the civil rights movement mayl be in vain, because segregationist organizations can use the umbrella of religious protection, along with taxpayer funds, to back up their convictions.

Wednesday, February 3, 1965

Letter from Abby Seldes to MLK

Young Abby Seldes writes Dr. King to inform him of how inspirational his words are. Seldes mentions that she is a 12-years-old from Pennsylvania and an avid supporter of Dr. King's leadership. She also discusses her parents' participation in the March on Washington.

Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

,

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

Friday, October 24, 1958

Newspaper Article on MLK

,

In this article from the Miami Florida Herald, the writer summarizes a portion of the book "Why We Can't Wait", written by Dr. King.

Sunday, August 9, 1964

Suffering

Dr. King records J. S. Mill’s view of suffering.

Letter from Moses Walker to MLK

,

Dr. King moves his family to Chicago to assist with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Walker writes to Dr. King on behalf of the Republican party of the twenty fourth ward. He thanks Dr. King for choosing the twenty fourth ward as the starting point for his campaign to end slum housing. Mayor Daley eventually negotiated with Dr. King to build better housing and to make mortgages available regardless of race.

Saturday, January 30, 1965

Letter from Mrs. George W. Hammond to Ralph David Abernathy

,

Mrs. Hammond writes Reverend Abernathy with the hope of finding someone to purchase her home in Bristol, New Hampshire.

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Pages