Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"NIGERIA"

abstract needed

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Memorandum

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, provides a progress report on ANLCA's work on Nigeria, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Southwest Africa (now Namibia). He mentions that the group offered to help the Nigerian federal government and the four regions mediate the conflict that resulted in the Nigeria-Biafra Civil War (1967-1970).

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Four Top Rights Leaders Considering Africa Trip

Roy Wilkins, Dr. King, Whitney Young, and A. Philip Randolph, four of America's top civil rights leaders, are considering making a trip to Africa to stop the war in Nigeria. These leaders also serve as members on the call committee of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Help For Nigeria

Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.

How 700 Ibos were Killed by Mistake

This article reports on the massacre of 700 Ibos by federal troops in the Ibo town of Asaba, Nigeria.

Invitation from Nuhu Bamali to Dr. and Mrs. King

Dr. and Mrs. King receive an invitation to a reception from the Chairman of the Nigerian Delegation to the Twentieth Session of the General Assembly and Deputy Foreign Minister.

Letter from Aggrey Oji to Theodore Brown

Mr. Oji writes Mr. Brown thanking him for a previous correspondence of support regarding various issues in Nigeria. Mr. Oji also offers to meet with Mr. Brown and other members of the American Negro Leadership Conference to discuss further issues.

Letter from Annie Emehel to Dr. King

In this letter, Mrs. Annie Emehel wishes Dr. King success, in his upcoming trip to Nigeria. Dr. King was going to Nigeria to try to help the government and Biafra find a solution to their disagreements. Mrs. Emehel states that she has confidence that Dr. King will be able to help both sides come to a resolution.

Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Letter from James H. Meredith to MLK

James Meredith writes from Nigeria to congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Noble Peace Prize and emphasizes that the struggle for human rights is a world-wide struggle. Meredith, the first African-American student to attend the University of Mississippi, was at that time a post-graduate researcher in Nigeria.

Letter from Nigerian Man to MLK

An affectionate admirer writes Dr. King to express his plans to take up studies in aeromechanics at a vocational school in the United States. The Nigerian native requests sponsorship from the Reverend and his organization to assist in this attempt.

Letter from Pat Mutzberg to Dora McDonald Regarding Meeting

Pat Mutzberg of the Atlanta Committee for International Visitors writes Miss McDonald to confirm Dr. King's upcoming appointment with Nigerian visitors.

Letter from Ronald Bauer to MLK

Ronald Bauer congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. As President of the Inter American University, Bauer informs Dr. King of the institution's initiatives in the quest for peace. Two international conferences, sponsored by Inter American University, engages university students from all over the world. Bauer is embarking on a plan to establish his own international university and invites Dr. King to be part of a special International Advisory Council featuring notable world leaders.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Roy Wilkins, of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, wrote Dr. King to explain his increasing concern over the violence in Nigeria. Wilkins requests Dr. King's presence for a meeting with Nigerian Leaders to discuss the possibilities of ending the hostilities.

Letter from S. O. Adebo to Theodore Brown

S. O. Adebo, a permanent representative of the Permanent Mission of Nigeria to the United Nations, requests a meeting with Mr. Brown and his colleagues. Mr. Brown is the Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa. This letter references the Nigeria-Biafra situation, which Dr. King was deeply concerned about.

Letter from Sam Aluko to MLK

Sam Aluko writes Dr. King requesting him to contribute to the National Relief Fund, which assists displaced people in Nigeria.

Letter from Sue Jane Mitchell Smock to MLK

Mrs. Smock writes to Dr. King a "note of appreciation" regarding the Nobel Peace Prize and her artwork. A 1964 issue of Time Magazine featured a photograph of Dr. King's living room which displayed a "woodcut print" of Mrs. Smock's work. She also invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a future exhibition in Atlanta.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

In a letter to Dr. King, Mr. Brown encloses an article pertaining to Nigeria being on the brink of disintegration and civil war.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa writes an uplifting message to General Yakubu Gowon of Lagos, Nigeria. They extend a "hand in friendship" to bring the war in Nigeria to an end.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

This is a memorandum from Theodore E. Brown concerning his trip to Nigeria. Brown attaches a newspaper article referencing the turmoil in Nigeria.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK and Others

Mr. Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other members of the ANLCA's call committee of vaccinations required when traveling internationally.

Meet the Press

This transcript of a special 90-minute edition of NBC’s Meet the Press features Dr. King and other prominent Negro civil rights leaders discussing the topics of war, nonviolence, integration, unemployment and black power. The program was aired on radio and television.

Memo from Theodore Brown

Mr. Brown informs several African American leaders, including Dr. King, of his attempts to raise funds for the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Memorandum from Theodore E. Brown Regarding 1968 Trip to Nigeria

Theodore E. Brown, the director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, reports the results of his recent trip to Nigeria to members of the Call Committee.

MLK Itinerary

This document details the meetings and events set to take place during Dr. King's trip to Europe, Asia, Africa and Hawaii over a 55 day span.

MLK Schedule for November, 1960

This schedule lists Dr. King's travel itinerary and speaking engagements for November, 1960.

New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

Pages