Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Nebraska (NE)"

Letter from MLK to Rev. W.C. Dobbins

,

Dr. King informs Rev. Dobbins that he is unable to meet with him in the next few months, but possibly will be able to in the coming spring.

Monday, October 21, 1963

Edwin B. Allaire's Letter to MLK

,

Mr. Allaire informs Dr. King that there are many individuals who would vigorously support him in becoming a presidential candidate.

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Notecard Containing the Definition of Thinking

This notecard quotes Dr. Brightman's definition of thinking, taken from "An Intro to Philosophy".

Origen

Dr. King records biographical information about Origen.

Letter from Charles W. Martine to Ohio Senator

This letter from Dental Technician Charles W. Martin speaks out against the racism in America. He denounces George Wallace as a racist candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election, admonishes members of Congress for not speaking out against Mr. Wallace, and states he will leave the service if Mr. Wallace is elected to the Presidency.

William E. Channing

Dr. King references theologian William E. Channing regarding his views on "Unitarian Christianity."

Monothelitism

Dr. King outlines the principles of Monothelitism.

King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed

,

This press release entitled, "King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed," highlights Dr. King's challenge to moderate white southerners to become more vocal against racial injustices.

Monday, March 25, 1963

Letter from Abraham Lincoln High School to MLK

,

Earl Saunders, an art teacher at Abraham Lincoln High School, writes to Dr. King regarding awards of merit for Dr. King's contribution to the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King and Mr. Saunders are both alumni of Boston University's School of Theology.

Wednesday, June 28, 1967

Meet the Press

,

This transcript of a special 90-minute edition of NBC’s Meet the Press features Dr. King and other prominent Negro civil rights leaders discussing the topics of war, nonviolence, integration, unemployment and black power. The program was aired on radio and television.

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Report from Morehouse College President to the Board of Trustees

,

In this report Hugh M. Gloster, the new President of Morehouse College presents his report to the Board of Trustees for the 1967-68 academic school year. In this report he addresses daily activities of the college, student body, new programs, enrollment, college faculty, grants and incentives received by Morehouse. He also addresses the goal for the college to raise 11 million by the year 1970 for its endowment.

Thursday, November 9, 1967

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

,

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

Sunday, June 25, 1967

Letter from United States Congress to MLK

,

Joseph McDade writes Dr. King to solicit his views regarding the affects of organized crime on the plight of the urban poor.

Friday, September 22, 1967

MLK Draft Notes: Worship

Dr. King preached this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist church on August 7, 1955. In this handwritten outline, Dr. King focuses on the practice of worship, claiming that it is an intrinsic part of human culture. After outlining a negative definition of worship, he approaches it from a "positive angle," describing a multitude of experiences he deems worshipful. Ultimately, he asserts that worship is useful on both a private and public level as it "helps us to transcend the hurly-burly of everyday life."

Permission Form from Friendship House to MLK for Signature

,

This document, from James G. Duignan of Friendship House, is sent to Dr. King for his signature, granting permission to reproduce, distribute and or sell recorded copies of two speeches.

Sunday, December 11, 1966

Thompson Memorial Chapel Program Featuring MLK

,

This program highlights Dr. King as guest preacher for Thompson Memorial Chapel's Sunday service.

Sunday, April 16, 1961

Letter from Edmond G. Jeffries to MLK

,

Edmond G. Jeffries writes Dr. King after hearing him speak at the Chicago Sunday Evening Club. Jeffries states, "The injustices that the white man has visited on the colored man for hundreds of years burns my soul." Jeffries expresses that he only wants to be a Christian.

Sunday, January 27, 1963

SCLC Project Report

The staff of SCLC provides a memorandum report to supporters regarding the status of current programs and projects. Important financial facts about the organization are also included.

Letter of Support from Bishop W.M. Jones

,

Bishop W. M. Jones drafts this correspondence to Dr. King, offering prayers to him and his co-workers.

Wednesday, September 4, 1963

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK

,

Jack Greenberg informs Dr. King that he has filed a case in Mississippi "requesting the court to require law enforcement officials to protect civil rights workers and other citizens."

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Letter from Edna Patricia Mildred Smith to MLK

Edna Smith, a high school senior, expresses her admiration to Dr. King and his works. She informs of the low ranking she received at a speech contest and asks him to prepare a ten-minute speech for their state contest. She also seeks his advice regarding her academic plans after high school.

MLK Comments on Jack O'Dell's Alleged Communist Ties

Dr. King attempts to correct the erroneous impressions created by various newspapers alleging Jack O'Dell's connection to "Communist" activities. While Dr. King maintains Mr. O'Dell's strong work performance, the Detroit native will relinquish his role "in order to avoid embarrassment to SCLC."

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

,

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to All Law Enforcement Officials

,

In this letter, President Hoover addresses all F.B.I. law enforcement officials. He discusses America's opposition to communism and describes it as an "insidious menace." However, Hoover warns that "attributing every adversity to communism" is ineffective and senseless. Instead he suggests that in order to defeat communism, it must be thoroughly studied and analyzed.

Saturday, April 1, 1961

Letter from Alan Campbell to MLK

,

Alan B. Campbell writes Dr. King to express his appreciation for the address "Paul's letter to American Christians," which he hopes to republish in national journals such as Readers' Digest.

Friday, July 26, 1963

Letter from MLK to David Sutton

,

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Downtown Luncheon Club to speak in Philadelphia.

Friday, September 10, 1965

Letter from Rayphil Clark to MLK

,

Michigan inmate Rayphil Clark urges Dr. King to assist him with receiving fair treatment during his incarceration. Clark lists multiple situations where Negro employees and inmates are intimidated by white prison officials. Most importantly, Clark feels that he is constantly being singled out and subjected to horrible treatment. According to Clark's description of prison officials, "they are more concerned with racial vengenaude then they are re-habiliation."

Wednesday, September 29, 1965

Telegram from Edward Daniels to MLK

,

Edward Daniels extends an invitation for Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at the National Conference of Anti-Poverty Agencies.

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Niebuhr (Christ)

Dr. King writes on Niebuhr's perception of Christ.

Letter from MLK to D. Martin Fischer about American People

,

Dr. King thanks Prof. Fischer for "submitting [his] thoughts and words of warning for the American People." Dr. King agrees with the professor's assertion that we should all try to "avoid the excesses and horrors of war."

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Pages