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A Call To Action-Lucis Trust

Lucis Trust wrote this "Call To Action" about the vast greivances that were occuring in America, as it related to the issue of race. He identified that African Americans were "condemned to an inferior way of life and excluded as a human being." Trust conveyed that a remedy must be provided for the ongoing injustice. The remedy he proposed is that the attitudes of White Americans needed to change, not only on a non-discriminitory basis, but by creating an atmosphere of inclusivism and goodwill.

Letter from MLK to Ivan Allen Jr.

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Dr. King writes Mayor Allen regarding a seemingly unfair price quota for the Atlanta Municipal Auditorium that the SCLC plans to use for the Harry Belafonte concert.

Thursday, May 31, 1962

Call to Survival

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This advertisement offers a "realistic appraisal" of the Vietnam situation and offers possible solutions.

Sunday, November 5, 1967

Post Card from Critic to MLK

This unstamped post card comes from a writer who identifies himself as "Ole Dorky" and targets Dr. King and the American Civil Liberties Union as "Communist skum." The writer disagrees with the work of civil rights and believes that efforts are "making matters worse for negroes."

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

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Dr. King expresses his approval of an executive order outlawing discrimination in federally assisted housing. He states that this is a courageous action that is a giant leap towards freedom and democracy.

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

God

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Universalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines some fundamental principles of "Universalism".

Letter from Chester Harness to MLK

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Chester Harness expresses to Dr. King his interest of being an honorary member of SCLC. He explains that due to the Vietnam War he can not make a financial contribution but he would like to contribute by participating in the Poor People's Campaign of 1968.

Saturday, December 9, 1967

Speech to the American Psychological Association

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In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Friday, September 1, 1967

Letter from A. William Loos to James Farmer

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A. William Loos expresses his agreement with the actions of the recipient, James Farmer, which lead to the reconsideration of a vote to remove United States troops from Vietnam.

Monday, July 19, 1965

Letter from Charles Sherrod to Friends of SNCC

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Field Secretary Charles Sherrod invites friends of the SNCC to an emergency meeting to outline the direction of the student and Civil Rights Movement. The meeting is to be held at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee which serves as a training ground for nonviolence and civil rights activities.

Saturday, July 22, 1961

Letter from Jennings Randolph to MLK

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Jennings Randolph writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his previous telegram regarding support of the Voting Rights bill which would abolish poll taxes.

Thursday, April 29, 1965

Letter from Robert L. Pino to MLK

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Mr. Pino, Chairman of the Local Union 2603 Civil Rights Committee of Lackawanna, New York, praises Dr. King's efforts in Albany, Georgia.

Monday, August 13, 1962

Letter to MLK from Joan Daves about New Publication

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In this letter Joan Daves reports to Dr. King a proposal for a French edition of "Strength to Love" based on a specified advance and royalty.

Wednesday, September 2, 1964

I've Been To The Mountaintop

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"I've Been to the Mountaintop" is the last speech Dr. King delivered. A day after making this address at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee, he was assassinated on the balcony of his hotel room. Dr. King spoke of faith, nonviolent protest and his support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike. He urged both a march and a boycott against Memphis area businesses. Dr. King ended his speech by musing about his previous brush with death and other threats against him.

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Diary in Jail

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Dr. King wrote a personal diary of his day-to-day experiences while in an Albany, Georgia jail for attempting to pray in front of City Hall. He pledged to return to jail, if necessary, if the City Commission refused to negotiate with Negro leaders on demands for immediate desegregation of all public facilities.

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

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Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Constance Webb would to ask him questions regarding the biography she is writing on Richard Wright.

Monday, March 13, 1967

Letter from Dora McDonald to Linda F. Neslage

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Dora McDonald informs Linda F. Neslage that she has the permission to print Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in the textbook, "Principles and Types of Speech."

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Science

Dr. King quotes a statement from A.D. Ritchie's "Civilization, Science and Religion" regarding the limits of science. Ritchie contradicts the idea that science can do "anything and everything."

MLK Report: Annual Address, MIA

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In his final address to the Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King gives a status report on the various initiatives of the organization. He also gives a final farewell in hopes that the MIA is challenged to continue to fight in the struggle for equality.

Thursday, December 3, 1959

Letter from Rev. Robert Hoggard of Grace Cathedral to Dora McDonald

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Reverend Robert Hoggard, of Grace Cathderal in San Francisco, contacts Dora McDonald with the hope that Dr. King will be able to preach for their congregation on March 28, 1965.

Thursday, February 18, 1965

Iroquois Brewery-A Report from the President

In this document, Terry Fox, President of Iroquois Brewery, issued a report informing the public that their company implemented a "Learn-And-Earn Program. The program offered young people in Buffalo, New York temporary summer jobs, in an effort to train future adult workers. Unfortunately, there is no listed year, for the beginning of the program, highlighted in the document.

Pelagianism

Dr. King defines Pelagianism as the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without divine aid.

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

God

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the ethics of God. According to the scriptures God is just and fair and demands "justice and sacrifice."

Letter from Era Canon to MLK

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Era Canon notifies Dr. King that her friend Doris Greene, whom recently passed, was very intrigued by his work. Mrs. Canon wants to contribute to Dr. King's organization with some of the finances Mrs. Greene has obtained upon her passing.

Monday, December 11, 1961

Term Paper Notes

During Dr. King's matriculation through Crozer Theological Seminary, he writes a term paper that contains results of a historical study on Mesopotamia and Egypt.

Letter from MLK to W. M. Jones

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Dr. King writes Bishop W. M. Jones of Israel of God's Church expressing his gratitude for their generous contribution to the SCLC.

Monday, September 9, 1963

Letter from Wayne Williams to Virgil D. Jones

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In this letter, Wayne Williams, Director of Field Activities at Fair Employment Practices Commission in Illinois, informs Virgil Jones that they have investigated his charge with the Commission and now want to review the information over with him.

Wednesday, August 23, 1967

Draft of I Have a Dream

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This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

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