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Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Letter form Dorothy Leeper to Muhammad Ali

Dorothy Leeper thanks Muhammad Ali for his courage in standing by his beliefs. She also commends him and Dr. King for their stance against the Vietnam War.

Letter from A. Dudley Ward to MLK

A. Dudley Ward, General Secretary for the General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church, forwards an enclosed resolution to Dr. King.

Letter from Andrew Young to James Bevel and Dave Delliger

Andrew Young writes Revered James Bevel and Mr. Dave Dellinger confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at a rally in New York, New York on April 15th. Young further addresses logistical issues that may arise in the execution of the event, as well as how to best increase participation.

Letter from Arnold Aronson to Cooperating Organizations

Arnold Aronson writes cooperating organizations to ensure that following the March on Washington, the government delivers on the stipulations of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from David T. Doherty to MLK

David T. Doherty, President of the Western Regional Interfraternity Council, invites Dr. King to attend the W.R.I.F.C. Conference in April to express his views on the role of fraternities within American culture.

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.

Letter from Douglas Straton to MLK

Douglas Straton, Chairman of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Oregon, invites Dr. King to participate in their Distinguished Visiting Lectureship Program. The department would appreciate Dr. King's presentation of three lectures and attendance at a breakfast meeting with the town clergy. They offer him a $500 honorarium and request that he consider coming the following school year.

Letter from Edith Green to MLK

Representative Edith Greene writes Dr. King concerning his previous telegram about the Mississippi challenge. Green concludes by agreeing with Dr. King's stance for a delegate vote in Mississippi.

Letter from George Carlson to MLK

George Carlson informs Dr. King that he handled the public relations and publicity for his appearance in Seattle. In addition, Mr. Carlson notifies Dr. King that the Jewish Temple in Portland requests the status his availability for a speaking engagement.

Letter from Grace Graham to MLK

Grace Graham, Chairman in the School of Education extends an invitation for Dr. King to give a series of lectures at several colleges in the Northwest. In addition to the University Oregon, other colleges include Montana State and Portland State.

Letter from Ira Edmond Gillet to MLK

Mr. Gillet, a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and former missionary in South Africa, sends Dr. King his thoughts on a recent petition circulated by the American Committee on Africa. He explains that the actions called for in the petition would "do more harm than good." Gillet encloses a copy of the petition, highlighted with his own comments, which implores President Kennedy to impose sanctions on South Africa.

Letter from Joan Daves to Philip Hanson

Here Joan Daves gives permission to Mr. Phillip Hanson for the use of words from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait", requested by Philip Hanson.

Letter from MLK to George Carlson

Dr. King responds to George Carlson's letter of recent date informing him that he cannot accept the invitation to speak at the Temple. Dr. King states that he would love to speak in Portland, but his schedule does not permit any more engagements.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Arthur Flemming

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for Mr. Flemming's contribution to the SCLC. He states that because of the contributors continuing support, the initiatives of the SCLC can persist forward.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Friedman

In this letter Ms. Dora McDonald informs Mr. Friedman of the University of Oregon that Dr. King's schedule will not allow for a contribution to "Forensic Quarterly". Such regrets were increasingly frequent occurrences as Dr. King’s prominence and workload grew.

Letter from Paul Yelter to MLK

Signed by twenty-one supporters, this letter requests that Dr. King make a public statement about his disapproval of the 1968 Olympic Boycott by American Negro athletes. The authors argue that the boycott will ruin a chance for Negro athletes to prove their equality to white athletes.

Letter from Peter A. Minthom to Ralph D. Abernathy

Peter Minthom, an American Indian from Oregon, requests assistance in traveling to Washington D.C. for the Poor People’s March.

Letter from Robert Friedman to Dora McDonald

Robert Friedman, a representative of "The Forensic Quarterly," asks Dora McDonald to find out if another SCLC staff member can write an article about compulsory service systems for his publication.

Letter from Robert Friedman to MLK Regarding "The Forensic Quarterly"

Robert Friedman informs Dr. King that manpower needs and compulsory service systems will be the topics of national discussion in high schools of the nation. Friedman asks King to contribute an article stating his view on the problem area for publication in "The Forensic Quarterly".

Letter from Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis to MLK

Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis invite Dr. King to speak to the students at University of Oregon.

Letter from Stuart E. Atkinson to the SCLC

Stuart E. Atkinson sends a donation to the SCLC and requests the address to which he should send donated clothing and toys.

Letter from Troy J. Horton to MLK

Troy J. Horton, a teacher at Wilson High School, inquires if Dr. King is interested in speaking to the student body of the school on topics such as racism, prejudice and segregation.

Letter to Mr. Walter Simcich from MLK

Dr. King informs Walter Simcich that he is "deeply grateful" to have been extended this invitation. Furthermore, Dr. King notifies Mr. Simcich that he is unable to accept this speaking engagement due to his heavy schedule involving the nonviolence movement.

MLK Request from Princeton Committee for Negotiation Now

Mary Temple of the Princeton Committee for Negotiation, invites Dr. King to make an appearance at a fundraising event.

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

Note from Mrs. Phyllis J. Sundquist to MLK

Mrs. Phyllis Sundquist encourages Dr. King to continue his stance against the Vietnam War for the betterment of the United States.

Proposed Agenda for the National Council of Churches Commission on Urban Life

This agenda from the Commission On Urban Life National Council of Churches, illustrates the chronological order in which each event will take place.

Response from MLK to Paul Yeiter

Dr. King responds to Yeiter's questioning of his support of plans to boycott the 1968 Olympic games. Dr. King argues that Negro athletes have presented specific and reasonable demands to the Olympic Committee, which reflects a valid concern for the social welfare and progress of the whole nation. He commends these athletes for their determination and courageous stand against racism and injustice.

Roy A. Gage Sends Support to MLK and SCLC

Roy A. Gage of Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Company writes Dr. King and the SCLC Newsletter expressing his interest in the work of Dr. King and encloses $10.00

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