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"DuBois State Memorial Proposed; Would Be in Great Barrington"

William F. Bell writes an article concerning a proposed W. E. Dubois State Memorial in Great Barrington.

"Green Power" for Negroes

This SCLC news release documents the success of "a pioneer agreement between the Chicago Freedom Movement and a large grocery chain." As a product of Operation Breadbasket, this development cycled both jobs and capital to keep them organic to the Negro community.

"Insight and Outlook..Negro Road to Power"

In this article, Joseph Kraft discusses the influences of Blacks voting.

"Life" by Eudora V. Savage

In this poem, Ms. Savage expresses her views on "Life."

"The American Dream"

This transcription of the commencement address delivered by Dr. King at Lincoln University on June 6 1961.

"Where Do We Go From Here"-Invoice

This document contains a Harper & Row, Publishers invoice for the sale of four copies of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?"

A Country Called Corporate America

New York Times Magazine writer Andrew Hacker writes about the growing problems caused by the "bigness" of corporate America. He says that large corporations are beginning to have so much power that they can damage the society without having to account for the consequences, as "corporate wealth buys corporate wishes." Some of the ways that they effect society are through their advertisements, their control of the labor market and education.

A Look to 1964

This is a draft of the article "A Look to 1964" written by Dr. King. Published on January 1, 1964 in the New York Amsterdam News. In the article, Dr. King addresses the strides the African American people have taken towards the struggle for equality.

A Proposal for Unity Day

Joseph Polowsky composed a proposal to present to the United Nations for the creation of an April 25th holiday, to be known as Unity Day. This holiday is in commemoration of a conference of the war-time allied nations in San Francisco.

A Resolution Directed to the African Methodist Episopal Church

This resolution endorses the appointment of Donald Jacobs as Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Address by MLK at the Washington, DC Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

Dr. King gives an address at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C. regarding race relations and the struggle for justice and racial equality in America. King discusses the responsibility of the President, Congress, and federal courts to ensure all blacks the have the opportunity and the right to vote. King closes by asserting that everyone must stand firm in faith and act only in love and nonviolence in the fight for these rights.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Chicago, Illinois

This document contains the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon at the Joint Defense Appeal of the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. He expresses what can be done and what laws should be passed to make sure others are not further abused.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Public Meeting

Dr. King is listed as the keynote speaker for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Forty-First Boule on August 10, 1964.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Annual Address by MLK for the Montgomery Improvement Association

This document outlines Dr. King's address for the Fourth Anniversary of the Montgomery Improvement Association, held at Bethel Baptist Church in Montgomery. In the address, Dr. King speaks about the history, achievements and current task of the Association.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Annual Record and Report of Life and Work

This document is a blank "Annual
Record and Report of Life and Work" for the American Baptist Convention. Had it been filled out, it would have contained information about the activities of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Annual Report by MLK

Dr. King illustrates in his annual report the innovative changes that have occurred within the country, as well as the world. He also expresses the Republican stand point on civil rights and the constant concern of racism.

Anonymous Letter to Charles C. Diggs Jr.

This anonymous letter to Congressman Charles Diggs, Jr. of Michigan details the grievances suffered by Negro and Caucasian females in the U.S. Army. The authors assert that they routinely are subjected to segregation in public accommodations and are denied equal opportunity for promotion and reenlistment.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer sends a letter to Dr. King and several other civil rights leaders. Although the exact message of the letter is unclear, the writer quotes numerous Biblical passages and Christian prayers. The writer, intermittently, also refers to the recipient as "Michael."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An unknown author questions Dr. King about his leadership and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. He references various racial, political, and social events, and stresses that Dr. King is responsible for all the riots, violence and looting.

Answers in the American Way

This text derives from a television show outlining the facts of the Black Panther Party. In attendance were civil rights activist like Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, H. Rapp Brown and their affiliates within the Civil Rights Movement.

Appeal to Billy Graham Regarding Religion

Matakichi Saito questions Billy Graham about his views on religion as it relates to discrimination.

Article: "MLK Writes Co-Religionists from Jail"

The Witness Magazine published the first of Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." The second part will appear in the next issue on June 27, 1963. The article describes Dr. King's letter as "one of those rare 'to-read-twice' documents."

Atlanta Operation Breadbasket Bi-Annual Report

Reverend Fred C. Bennette, Jr. issues the bi-annual report for the Atlanta Chapter of Operation Breadbasket. Reverend Bennette expounds on the mission of Dr. King and the SCLC to create economic opportunities through advances in employment.

Autograph Request

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

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