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"RUSSIAN FEDERATION"

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."

ABC's Issues and Answers: MLK Interview

Dr. King sat down with Tom Jerriel, Atlanta Bureau Chief, and John Casserly, Washington Correspondent, of the American Broadcasting Company for their program "Issues and Answers." They discussed the civil rights movement, Dr. King's upcoming book, and the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that Dr. King would serve jail time in Birmingham.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Chicago, Illinois

This document contains the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon at the Joint Defense Appeal of the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. He expresses what can be done and what laws should be passed to make sure others are not further abused.

America

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's view in "The Irony of American History" that "the paradise of domestic security is suspended in a hell of global insecurity."

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer sends a letter to Dr. King and several other civil rights leaders. Although the exact message of the letter is unclear, the writer quotes numerous Biblical passages and Christian prayers. The writer, intermittently, also refers to the recipient as "Michael."

Anticommunist Flyer

This flyer suggests that the U.N. consists of communists Jews. Several contacts are provided for Americans to receive support and be educated about Communism.

Antisemitism

An anonymous group issues a public statement addressing the rising issue of antisemitism throughout the world. According to the document, Soviet Jewry are facing "cultural extinction." As a result, Soviet relations have worsened in Israel. The group indicates that the policies of the U.S.S.R. have caused this wave of antisemitic discrimination and a nation-wide effort will have to help eradicate the movement.

Bread at Midnight

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Civil Rights and Vietnam

An avid supporter urges Dr. King to divert his attention to the War in Vietnam. He asserts "This war will force Chinese and Russian to interfere and may further expand into thermonuclear war..."

Cooperative/Noble Competition

Dr. King writes a sermon on the topic "Cooperative Competition." King utilizes the biblical text deriving from Luke chapter 22 verse 24, which expresses how Jesus views competition. According to the text, Jesus thinks that competition is good as long as an individual competes with humility and serving others.

Food & Allied World Crises: Is There A Solution?

This document is a composition of several articles addressing the global state of food consumption and production.

How 700 Ibos were Killed by Mistake

This article reports on the massacre of 700 Ibos by federal troops in the Ibo town of Asaba, Nigeria.

Is Dr. King Used as Soviet Decoy?

This article discusses Dr. King's forthcoming visit to Russia to speak with representatives from the US and North and South Vietnam. Dr. King seeks to assist in ending the war in Vietnam; however, onlookers do not think his actions will lead to positive results.

Letter from CB Gilless to MLK

Mr. Gilless writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed petition to establish a 'World Government'. He beckons "Just how much better than the American free public do you think the world government will be?" He requests an immediate rebuttal.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to Mr. Paul Harvey

Charles Waring presents ways to prevent the spread of communism around the world. He also questions previous decisions by the United States government and speculates how the outcome would have been different in various conflicts.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. E. A. Larson

Dora McDonald notifies Mrs. E. Larson of Dr. King's absence and informs her that he has never been to Russia, but has no objection to a visit there.

Letter from Duncan Wood to MLK

This letter outlines Dr. King's upcoming trip to Moscow. The purpose of the mission is to have past Nobel Peace Prize winners partake in an initiative to promote peace in Vietnam.

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Letter from James O'Malley to MLK

Father James O'Malley of St. Nicholas of Tolentine Church in Chicago asks Dr. King to withdraw from the Chicago Lawn area. He is concerned about the potential response to integration of the Lithuanians and Poles who live in the neighborhood.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK encluding copy of British magazine SLANT

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has enclosed a copy of the British magazine SLANT that has a shortened version of his Riverside Church address inside.

Letter from MLK to AJ Muste

After considerable thought and prayer, Dr. King informs the recipients of this letter of his decision to travel to the Soviet Union under the sponsorship of the American Baptist Convention. He conveys his sense of duty as a Negro leader to speak to Baptists in Russia.

Letter from MLK to E. Weidner

Dr. King informs Mrs. E. Weidner that Negroes have enjoyed positions of respect and prestige in non-Negro nations. He cites several examples in history to this statement.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from PLAYBOY Magazine to MLK

Playboy Editorial Director A.C. Spectorsky requests comments from Dr. King regarding Kenneth Tynan's article "Open Letter to an American Liberal," which accompanies the letter.

Letter from Richard P. Heath to MLK

Richard P. Heath expresses his distaste for Dr. King's method of attaining equal rights and freedoms. He posits, "In order to have rights and freedoms, we must be responsible for our actions."

Letter from William Rutherford to MLK

William Rutherford expresses his enthusiasm for being a new addition to Dr. King's team. Rutherford also encloses newspaper clipping on the Pacem in Terris meetings.

Letter to MLK from A. P. Swiderskas

Mr. Swiderskas writes to Dr. King expressing his general hatered of the black race.

Levels of Love

Dr. King describes five levels of love, from lowest to highest: utilitarian love, friendship, romantic love, humanitarian love, and agape. The last he refers to as Christian love, the love of God operating in the human heart. The first four, he states, are love for one’s own sake. The fifth is love for another person for their sake. This sermon was delivered by Dr. King on May 21, 1967 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

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