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"South Africa"

1965 Human Rights Day Flyer

This flyer advertises a rally to benefit South African victims of apartheid.

A Journey of Conscience

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

American Committee On Africa Invitation to Protest Apartheid

This form letter informs and invites the recipients to attend functions sponsored by the American Committee on Africa in protest against Chase Manhattan Bank's financial relationship with the apartheid regime in South Africa.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Memorandum

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, provides a progress report on ANLCA's work on Nigeria, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Southwest Africa (now Namibia). He mentions that the group offered to help the Nigerian federal government and the four regions mediate the conflict that resulted in the Nigeria-Biafra Civil War (1967-1970).

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

Anti-Poverty Expenditures that Cheat Federal Taxpayers and the Poor

Harry G. and Elizabeth R. Brown express their concerns about housing in America. They claim that while open housing will help Negroes who can afford it, those who cannot will continue to live in slums. They pose the idea of reforming the tax policy as a solution to this problem.

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

Black Power: Two Views

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Bread at Midnight

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.

Cape Times: No Reply to Luther King Invitation

L. Marquard writes an article discussing the discontent that Dr. J. D. Vorster and Rev. J. A. Heynes had regarding Dr. King's honorary degree from the Vrye Universiteit of Amsterdam.

Challenge on Luther King

The author of this article says that Rev. I. L. de Villiers' letter lacked moderation, reasoned argument and tolerance of a different point of view. He also says that anyone who advocates for racial equality is branded as communist and that Afrikaners are suffering as a result.

Crisis and The Church

Dr. King emphasizes the important role of the Church in the midst of a global political and social shift. He explores in detail the steps necessary to implement changes through the Church and its' constituents.

Dexter Echo: February 3, 1960

This issue of the Dexter Echo honors Dr. and Mrs. King's final day at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Makola

Dr. King thanks Mr. Makola for reminding him of the "injustices and inequalities" Negroes face both in the United States and South Africa. Dr. King asserts that the issues Negroes face are symptoms of a deeper issue involving foreign policy and that his current focus is on the Vietnam War.

Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.

Foreword of "The Power of Nonviolence"

This is a copy of a foreword written by Dr. King to Richard Gregg's "The Power of Nonviolence."

Founders Day Address

Dr. King addresses Spelman College at their Founders Day celebration. He discusses issues such as the Promised Land and the function of education.

Fundraising Letter from MLK Addressed to Friends

Dr. King writes this letter on behalf of the Workers Defense League, requesting funds to assist six South African youth who seek political protection in the U.S.

H. Rap Brown Requests SNCC Support

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's New York office of International Affairs, requests support during the August 27, 1967 boycott of General Motors. After declaring itself a Human Rights organization, SNCC requests support in the worldwide struggle for human rights, especially black liberation schools in the United States.

Harry Belafonte - American Committee on Africa

Harry Belafonte sends a request for support in South Africa bringing awareness to apartheid and the injustices it entails. Belafonte implores the reader to send immediate help to the country in financial contributions, as an effort to fight racism and government corruption.

Harry Belafonte Concert Promotion

The Belafonte Concert Committee reaches out to Atlanta music lovers for a show featuring Harry Belafonte and Miriam Makeba.

Hungry Club Speech

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

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