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"Tokyo, Japan"

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Appeal to Billy Graham Regarding Religion

Matakichi Saito questions Billy Graham about his views on religion as it relates to discrimination.

Current Magazine

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Dr. Abernathy Selected for World Peace Mission

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces that Ralph D. Abernathy and his wife will embark on a world-wide mission for peace. Abernathy will serve as a delegate to the International Inter-religious Symposium on Peace.

Howard University Charter Day Observance

Howard University celebrates its' Charter Day Observance with a program that includes a speech by Dr. King. The program also acknowledges the recipients of the Alumni Achievement Award. Such individuals include Ossie Davis and Leroy F. Florant.

Invitation to Dr. King from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs

Dr. King is invited to take part in the 1967 13th Annual World Conference of the Japan Council against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs.

Invitation to the 20th Anniversary World Conference Against Atom and Hydrogen Bombs

Ichiro Mortaki, of the Japan Congress Against Atom & Hyrdrogen Bombs, invites Dr. King to their conference taking place 20 years after two atomic bombs were dropping on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II. This leading Japanese disarmament organization was founded the same year they extended this invitation to Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter Seeger

Ms. McDonald informs American folk singer,Peter Seeger, that Dr. King will be unable to accept the invitation to appear on a Japan television program in January or February of the coming year. Dr. King asks that Mr. Seeger informs the program host that sometime during the summer would be more favorable for his schedule.

Letter from Nippon Television Corporation

Producer Yasuo Yamanaka acknowledges Dr. King's consideration of an invitation to appear on his television program in Tokyo, Japan.

Letter from Peter Seeger to MLK

American folk singer, songwriter and activist Peter Seeger shares with Dr. King a previous experience appearing on a television program in Tokyo. Seeger recommends the program as an excellent means to communicate with the Japanese people.

Letter from Roy Pfaff of Promoting Enduring Peace Inc.

Promoting Enduring Peace Inc. invites friends of the organization to participate in one of their 1968 travel seminars. The three tours consist of the Round-The-World Goodwill Seminar, Soviet Union Tour, Around-The World Across Siberia, Mongolia and Japan. The traveling seminars include conferences, interviews, and other cultural educational features. The organization provides the member with possible materials they could order prior to leaving for one of the seminars.

Letter from Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti to MLK

The Indian organization, Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti, expresses admiration of Dr. King's heroic struggle for civil rights in the US, along with his application of Mahatma Gandhi's methods. A bronze bust of Gandhi is offered as a gift of appreciation and a request made for placement of the statue in a children's park.

Letter from Shinichi Oshima to MLK

Fifteen year old Shinichi Oshima of Japan, writes Dr. King expressing his admiration and appreciation for the movement and the black man. He also discusses his religious views and his desire to help black men in Africa.

Letter from Tetsuo Kohmoto to MLK

Tetsuo Kohmoto, president of the Shinkyo Shuppansha Protestant Publishing Company, writes Dr. King regarding the Japanese edition of "Strength to Love." Kuhmoto requests a preface or message for the book and thanks Dr. King in advance for his kindness.

Letter from Tetsuo Kohmoto to MLK

Tetsuo Kohmoto, president of the Shinkyo Shuppansha Protestant Publishing Company, inquired to Joan Daves about publishing Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love," in Japanese. Mr. Kohmoto happily informs Dr. King that the Japanese edition of his book has now been "published to the reading public in Japan."

Letter from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs to MLK

Japanese Representatives write Dr. and Mrs. King inviting them to the 13th World Conference against atomic and hydrogen bombs.

Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Norman Thomas sends Dr. King an enclosure, which supports Senator Fulbright's statements concerning the use of nuclear weapons in Vietnam. He asks Dr. King to stand in solidarity with him on this issue by adding his name to the statement.

Men Who Live Differently

James E. Will shares a Christian perspective on conformity and its relation to humanity and God.

MLK Itinerary

This document details the meetings and events set to take place during Dr. King's trip to Europe, Asia, Africa and Hawaii over a 55 day span.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1963

This issue of the SCLC Newsletter covers the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The publication features a number of photographs, editorials and the full text of Dr. King's Washington address.

Telegram from Yamanaka TV to Pete Seeger

A Japanese television host writes American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger requesting that he encourage Dr. King to accept an invitation to appear on the show.

Telegram Request to MLK on the Kennedy Assassination

This Western Union Telegram was sent to Dr. King from Tokyo, requesting commentary concerning John F. Kennedy's assassination for the magazine Midorikawa.

The 13th World Conference against A and H Bombs

The Japan Council against A(tom) and H(ydrogen) Bombs marks the subjects of discussion for their 13th World Conference. The purpose of the conference is to eliminate the usage of nuclear weaponry in U.S. aggression against Vietnam. The Council is also advocating for an end of the Vietnam War and reparations for those harmed by the use of nuclear weapons.

The American Dream

This document contains the text of an address that Dr. King gave at Plymouth Church of The Pilgrims in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King describes the steps that should be taken in order to make the American Dream a reality.