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The Sentinel: Sweetheart's Korner

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Hattie Bea Carney expresses her views and feelings on the moral trend of young people. Throughout the article, Ms. Carney offers alternative, as well as, parental advice for Christian parents.

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Typical Theistic Personalism

Dr. King sketches notes on theistic personalism with references to Friedrich Leibniz, George Berkeley, Immanuel Kant, and Hermann Lotze.

Letter from Sydney J. Chase to MLK

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Mr. Chase, a political science major at Hofstra College, has reached out to Dr.King inquiring about assistance with his term paper on "non-violence as a political force."

Wednesday, March 16, 1960

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

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Joan Daves writes Dr. King regarding an incomplete document that he signed for the "English tax people." For his convenience, she encloses a pre-written letter to send to England once the document is officially completed.

Monday, January 13, 1964

Thank you letter to MLK from Major

Major thanks Dr. King for a good meeting and some great plans. He apologizes for his tardiness due to a delay in Washington.

Anonymous Sender Criticizes MLK

This anonymous writer challenges Dr. King with his complaints concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He argues that a Negro man should be held responsible for breaking the law and should expect rightful punishment.

The Meaning of the Sit-Ins

This document describes the growing civil rights movement. It discusses the tactics various civil rights organizations are using and briefly touches on the tactics of opposition groups.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

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Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Friday, March 15, 1968

Letter from Mary Grooms to Coretta Scott King

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Mrs. Mary H. Grooms writes Mrs. Coretta Scott King expressing her support for Dr. King and the upcoming March on Washington. She also requests that Dr. King reach out to leaders in the North who have sought to emulate his methods.

Friday, August 23, 1963

Paint

Dr. King writes about the magnificent wonders of the galaxy.

Seating List for Pacem In Terris II

This document is an alphabetical seating list of participants for the Pacem In Terris II (Peace on Earth) Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland.

Statement by MLK on the U.S. Stand in Vietnam

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Dr. King discusses how to involve the public in discussions regarding the Vietnam War. He states that the public should be educated about the history and issues of the war.

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Letter from Rita Machelle Foster to MLK

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Rita Machelle Foster, an eighth grade student a Harvard Elementary School, requests any information or documentation provided by Dr. King for her composition on Negro History Week. Ms. Foster asks that Dr. King provide a photograph and discuss the James Meredith situation.

Wednesday, January 30, 1963

Letter from MLK to Rev. Lucks Regarding Assistant Pastor

In this letter, Dr. King advises Rev. Lucks on choosing an assistant pastor.

Letter from John R. Yungblut to CSK

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Mr. Yungblut of Quaker House, writes Mrs. King to inquire whether the King Children may be interested in participating in a youth dramatics program.

Monday, August 2, 1965

Letter from George Carlson to MLK

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George Carlson informs Dr. King that he handled the public relations and publicity for his appearance in Seattle. In addition, Mr. Carlson notifies Dr. King that the Jewish Temple in Portland requests the status his availability for a speaking engagement.

Friday, September 28, 1962

Letter from Morton S. Grossman to MLK

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In this correspondence, Morton S. Grossman, expressed his joy, over Dr. King's New Year's card, and enclosed a check, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In addition, Mr. Grossman requested a note, signed by Dr. King, to add to his autograph collection.

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Letter to Dr. King

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The author of this letter writes to oppose Dr. King's view of the government being the greatest infuser of violence. The author attributes Communism as the root of violence, and asks Dr. King to consider the consequences of unfavorable criticism during such times.

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Letter from MLK to May Edward Chinn

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Dr. King responds to Dr. May Chinn's letter of support and encouragement. King states, "Our struggle for freedom is often difficult and the moments are often frustrating, but we gain new courage to carry on..."

Monday, December 23, 1963

SNCC - SCLC Alabama Staff Meeting

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Randolph Blackwell updates Andrew Young of the recent SCLC and SNCC joint meeting intended to resolve any conflicts between the two organizations and their initiatives within the state of Alabama. The mounting tension between the two civil rights organizations is attributed to the rise of Black Panther Party chapters throughout the South, a phenomenon from which SCLC intends to distance itself.

Friday, January 28, 1966

MLK Remarks at the Launching of SCLC's Crusade for Citizenship

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Dr. King delivered this speech at a launch meeting for the Crusade for Citizenship in Miami, Florida. He discusses the denial of African Americans' right to vote by relating it to other former disfranchised Americans such as those who did not own property and women. Dr. King discusses the hypocrisy in some American officials' advocacy of democratic election in other European countries as well as the social and economic welfare of all Americans.

Wednesday, February 12, 1958

Letter from William R. Rice to MLK

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William Rice, editorial director for WLS radio in Chicago, offers Dr. King suggestions for Operation Dropout. Also enclosed in the letter is a statement on the reasons to stay in school.

Thursday, October 20, 1966

Knowledge

Dr. King outlines epistemological claims that deal with the "universals" and the "particulars" of knowledge. In doing so, he references the philosophical views of Socrates and St. Thomas Aquinas.

Letter from Arthur James to MLK

Arthur James, a member of the Movement for the Advancement of Black Brotherhood and Culture, invites Dr. King to speak at Lincoln University.

Letter from Paul R. Trumpler to MLK

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Paul Trumpler writes Dr. King expressing how he and his wife are pleased to have the chance to support Dr. King's work. They believe in Dr. King's ideas regarding racial issues and solutions. Trumpler encloses a check written out to Dr. King so he can use the money as he designate.

Friday, May 25, 1962

MLK/SCLC Fundraising Letter and Response

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Bruce and Gertrude joins send their support and contribution on the back of the SCLC fundraising letter they received. They refer to the "old sociological truth that one cannot keep a person in the gutter without needing to stay in there himself to keep the other down there," and thank Dr. King for leadership that liberates both Negro and White.

Wednesday, December 27, 1961

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

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Attorney John Bolt Culbertson, a civil rights activist and politician, invites Dr. King to speak at a concert that will benefit the children of Medgar Evers and the families of the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Culbertson explains that the program will feature performances from different choirs. He also mentions that if Dr. King is unable to attend, he would appreciate Dr. King's help securing another prominent speaker.

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Letter from Harris Schultz to MLK

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Harris Schultz questions the decision to impose an economic boycott in Alabama. He lists several reasons not to boycott, including the voting rights bill currently under consideration in Congress, the bombing of a Negro citizen's home in Birmingham and the apathy of some people in Alabama.

Saturday, April 3, 1965

Breadbasket and National Tea Agree

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Operation Breadbasket teams up with the National Tea Company to improve employment and business opportunities for Negroes.

Monday, December 12, 1966

People to People: Something Happening in Mississippi

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In this article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, a group of Negroes from Mississippi who displayed the power of nonviolence by challenging the seating of the state's all-white regular Democratic delegation at the 1964 Democratic Convention.

Saturday, October 17, 1964

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