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"Education"

Peace of Mind or Soul

Dr. King quotes French physiologist Dr. Charles Richet.

Hus, John

Dr. King makes biographical notes about John Hus, the leader of the Czech reform.

Morality

Dr. King documents a quote from British statesman John Morley regarding the morality of war. Dr. King refers to the quote, taken from Morley's publication "Recollection," as a "grand, potent monosyllable." Following the citation, Dr. King comments, "This is an agnostic talking."

Apollinarianism

Dr. King defines Apollinarianism.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Exodus in reference to "the idea of a primitive anthropomorphic God."

Berkeley, George

Dr. King notes Berkeley's views on metaphysics.

Chapter II - The Methodologies of Tillich and Wieman

This is the third chapter of Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conception of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Emotionalism in Religion

Dr. King records a quote from a book entitled "The Gift of Tongues, A Study in the Pathological Aspects of Christianity".

Justice Versus Injustice

Dr. King explains that the power that establishes justice also generates injustice. He also references an ancient Egyptian story "The Eloquent Peasant" and James Henry Breasted's "The Dawn of Conscience."

Anselm's Theory

Dr. King discusses Catholic theology referencing the theories of Aquinas and Anselm regarding the topic of "sin."

Plato Psychology

Dr. King explores Plato's contribution to psychology.

Schleiermacher (Dogmas & Creeds)

Dr. King references Friedrich Schleiermacher's notions of dogmas and creeds, stating that they are mere descriptions of feeling.

Toynbee

Dr. King highlights a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's twelve-volume analysis of the rise and fall of civilizations, "A Study of History."

Tests of Great Music

Dr. King lists five criteria to use to evaluate whether a piece of music is great. Great music should hold its appeal over time, connect different experiences, foster a deeper life experience, unify history and integrate the individual personality.

The Uniqueness of Jesus

Dr. King reflects on the virgin birth of Jesus and how this attribute was used to contextualize his "uniqueness." This reflection later appeared in his essay entitled "What Experiences of Christians Living in the Early Christian Century Led to the Christian Doctrines of the Divine Sonship of Jesus, the Virgin Birth, and the Bodily Resurrection" that he completed during his time at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Freudianism

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr on the subject of Freudianism from "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Isaiah

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Isaiah regarding topics like ritual sacrifice, knowledge, social ethics, and the doctrine of man.

Worship

Dr. King describes the challenge of the Protestant Church as finding a balance between objective and subjective worship.

Hegel System Diagram

Dr. King outlines notes regarding Hegel's system, which includes logic, nature, the mind and the spirit.

Problem of Evil

Dr. King writes about the problem of evil according to the 10th chapter of Proverbs.

Habakkuk

This note card contains Dr. King's notes on the Old Testament book of Habakkuk.

Funeral

Dr. King quotes Shakespeare's "Hamlet."

Spirit

Dr. King writes that there is no way of defining the essential nature of spirit because it is manifested only in the activities of intellect, sensibility and will.

Worship

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from James Bissett Pratt's "Religious Consciousness," which focuses on the purpose of the Protestant sermon. Dr. King expands Pratt's analysis to encompass the entire Protestant service.

Capitalism

Dr. King quotes the Honorable John Rankin's remarks regarding capitalism. He discusses two motives that make human beings work: "fear of punishment and the hope of reward."

Resurrection of Jesus

Dr. King writes about John Mansfield's play entitled "The Trial of Jesus."

Selfishness

Dr. King cites Schopenhauer's book "The World as Will and Ideas" and records a passage on selfishness.

Man: Sinner

Referencing Psalms 14:3, Dr. King discusses the completeness of sin in relationship to man.

Jeremiah

In this series of ten notecards, Dr. King breaks down the Book of Jeremiah into mutiple sections, including chapters and versus regarding Good, knowledge, sin, and forgiveness.

Man

Dr. King quotes Nobel Literature Prize winner William Faulkner on the prospects for man.

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