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"Speeches"

Press Conference Statement on New York

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Dr. King addresses the city of New York and the problem of mounting violence. Dr. King urges the city to help take a stand by promoting social justice through nonviolence efforts and strategies.

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Draft Statement of Reverend Dr. MLK Jr.

This statement, not written in Dr. King's hand, responds to Joseph Alsop's syndicated column in the New York Herald Tribune. Dr. King clarifies that SCLC has no affiliation with the Communist Party. He also states the SCLC has not continued a relationship with Jack O'Dell since he was relieved of his responsibilities.

Remarks by MLK at the Freedom House Annual Dinner

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Dr. King expresses his appreciation for being honored by Freedom House. He also pays tribute to the life and work of John F. Kennedy while encourging others to honor his memory through their dedication to civil rights.

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Senator Edward Kennedy's Address to SCLC

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Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-MA) addresses the 1966 SCLC Annual Convention, stating that the sit-ins, freedom rides and Montgomery bus boycott created a movement that brought about the most important change of the last 20 years. He says that while the caste system in politics is over, the life of the average Negro hasn’t changed much. Society is becoming divided rich and poor, black and white, and a massive commitment of national resources must be made to upgrade Negro life in America.

Monday, August 8, 1966

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Chicago, Illinois

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This document contains the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon at the Joint Defense Appeal of the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. He expresses what can be done and what laws should be passed to make sure others are not further abused.

Tuesday, April 30, 1957

What Are We Fighting For?

This outlines the sermon "What Are We Fighting For" into three components: the past, the present, and the future.

Address By Senator Edward M. Kennedy to the SCLC

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Senator Edward M. Kennedy highlights Dr. King's efforts during the Civil Rights Movement. He also expresses concerns about poverty, unemployment, nonviolence, segregation and integrity.

Monday, August 8, 1966

Why We Chose Jail Rather than Bail

Dr. King cites seven reasons for choosing jail not bail. Among them is that ?the highest expression of nonviolence is self suffering.?

Vision of a World Made New

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This is a draft of "The Vision of a World Made New," a speech that Dr. King delivered during the 1954 Women's Auxiliary Convention. President Nannie H. Burroughs invited Dr. King to address the group's annual meeting where he condemned imperialism, colonialism, and segregation.

Thursday, September 9, 1954

Speeches by the Leaders

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

Statement Issued from Harlem Hospital by MLK

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Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the staff at Harlem Hospital and those who supported him during his stay at this location. He asserts that the telegrams, letters, calls and other means of contact have been accepted as a token of respect.

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Introduction of Senator Edward M. Kennedy

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Dr. King introduces Senator Edward M. Kennedy at a SCLC banquet and highlights his accomplishments.

Monday, August 8, 1966

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

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On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

Friday, December 11, 1964

Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

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Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.

Monday, August 22, 1966

Hungry Club Speech

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This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Statement by MLK

Dr. King releases a public statement addressing the issues regarding the conflict in Vietnam.

Draft of Statement "Vote No on State Question 409" by MLK

In this draft of a statement, Dr. King discusses the misnomer of 'right-to-work,' stating that the law is against Civil Rights as it is anti-union.

MLK's Statement on Church Bombing in Leesburg, GA

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MLK expresses his clear disgust with the actions of the civil rights resisters, denouncing their bombing of a local church.

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

MLK Announces The Jail Sentences Stemming from the 1963 Birmingham Demonstrations

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Dr. King makes this statement regarding the arrest of himself and other leaders of the 1963 Birmingham struggle. The Supreme Court in 1967 ruled that these leaders unjustly broke the city wide injunction banning demonstrations. Dr. King urges the nation, "Take heed. Do not allow the Bill of Rights to become a prisoner of war."

Monday, October 30, 1967

MLK Address at the Georgia State Capitol Regarding Julian Bond

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Dr. King delivers this speech at the State Capitol of Georgia protesting the legislation refusal to seat black politician Julian Bond. King calls this a "grave injustice" particularly since the state legislature of Georgia considers itself protecting the United States Constitution. Dr. King points out the irony of this act and exposes other irresponsible actions of the legislature.

Friday, January 14, 1966

Founders Day Address

Dr. King addresses Spelman College at their Founders Day celebration. He discusses issues such as the Promised Land and the function of education.

Statement on Penance for Violence in Albany, Georgia

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Dr. King calls for a day of penance that will serve as a tactic of the self-purification step of the nonviolence method. Dr. King urges for the City Commission to talk with leaders of the Albany Movement.

Monday, July 30, 1962

MLK's Address to American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa

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Drawing connections between the social injustices of two continents, Dr. King discusses the relationship between segregation in America and colonialism in Africa. Dr. King also shares his opinion about America dominating Africa politically and economically.

Saturday, November 24, 1962

Statement by Albert Raby Responding to Attack on MLK by Ernest Rather

Albert Raby responds to questions by Ernest Rather about Dr. King's statistics related to Negro housing conditions. He explains that Dr. King's facts were taken from the 1960 census, which he contrasts with statistics from the Department of Urban Renewal.

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

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Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Monday, October 30, 1967

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

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Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Friday, December 27, 1963

Who They are and Why They Struck

This article stresses the unfair treatment of twenty-two Claussen Bakery workers. This article also addresses why the workers went on strike.

The Role of the Church

Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Court Hearings

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Dr. King compares past discrimination to recent strides that have been made in the American justice system.

Friday, December 3, 1965

Address for the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights

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This address was delivered by Dr. King at the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights event on May 17, 1962. Dr. King opens by discussing various anniversaries that coincide with the event and represent similar struggles for justice including the Supreme Court school desegregation ruling, the Emancipation Proclamation, and Henry David Thoreau's death.

Thursday, May 17, 1962

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