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"Speeches"

Statement of Congressman Seymour Halpern in the House Debate on the Voting Rights Bill

Mr. Halpern addresses the Chairman of the House of Representatives in favor of passing the Voting Rights Bill. He wants to ensure that the bill is enacted in a way that will not allow it to be manipulated by individual states, causing further discrimination against African Americans and non-English speakers. Mr. Halpern goes on to explain other acts that must take place and suggests other tenants to be incorporated into the bill in order to make sure all Americans have equal rights under the law.

Press Internationale Concludes Fifth Year of Broadcasting Over WBKB-TV

Le Van Enterprises, Inc. announces that Press Internationale,a television show that provides analysis of international issues, has completed five years of weekly broadcasting in Chicago.

Inauguration Response by J. Lynwood Gresham

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This document is the inauguration response delivered by Dr. J. Lynwood Gresham of Barber-Scotia College.

Friday, November 10, 1967

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

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Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Tuesday, September 6, 1960

MLK's Statement on Birmingham Jails

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During a broadcast, Dr. King states that the witness and determination of those incarcerated in Birmingham, will break down the barriers of segregation.

Monday, May 6, 1963

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

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Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Monday, November 14, 1966

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

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Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

Monday, December 4, 1967

I Have A Dream

This is an excerpt of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech, as delivered at the March on Washington. The moderator asks Marion Anderson to sing, "He's Got the Whole World In His Hands."

Let My People Vote

Dr. King addresses the problem of voting that Negroes in America are encountering and also talks about SCOPE's upcoming initiatives.

Statement by MLK on Segregation

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In this statement from Dr. King on segregation, he argues that it is "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Thursday, July 11, 1963

MLK Statement about the New York Riots

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Dr. Kind addresses the press' claim that civil rights leaders are involved in the outbreak of riots in New York. He says that violence creates more social problems than it solves. He says that government officials need to take responsibility and help all American citizens gain justice and equality.

Monday, July 27, 1964

MLK's Statement Regarding Civil Rights Activists' Murders

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This statement by Dr. King was written regarding the lynching and murders of three civil rights activists: James Cheyney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. When Mississippi officials refused to pursue the prosecution of those involved, national outrage prompted the ensuing major federal intervention.

Friday, December 11, 1964

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

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In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

Thursday, January 17, 1963

The Other America

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Dr. King delivered this speech, "The Other America," for the Local 1199 Salute to Freedom program. The speech emphasized the need to address poverty, the Vietnam War, and race relations in America.

Sunday, March 10, 1968

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Asheville, North Carolina

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This is the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon before the sixty-sixth annual convention of the General Federation of Women's Club. He discusses the differences in countries dealing with Communism and America being a democracy.

Wednesday, June 5, 1957

At the Beginning of the Youth Leadership Conference

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While speaking to the Youth Leadership Conference in Raleigh, NC, Dr. King elaborates on the student sit-in movements, which he says served as a representation of the plight of the American Negro regarding their struggle for justice. Dr. King further lists the various details of their strategy for victory.

Friday, April 15, 1960

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

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This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

Friday, December 11, 1964

Press Statement Regarding Crusade for Citizenship

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Dr. King delivers a statement surrounding the civil rights struggle of the Negro community and the appeals for justice to public officials. He asserts that in regards to the Prayer Pilgrimage, there cannot be a citizen whom does not have the right to vote. With the initiation of the Crusade for Citizenship, the citizenship of the Negro has the opportunity to be a reality.

Saturday, October 5, 1957

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

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This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Thursday, October 1, 1959

Otline: The Philosophy of Nonviolence

This document outlines Dr. King's speech, "The Philosophy of Nonviolence." He notes both the means and ends of nonviolence and explains that the "highest expression" of non-injury is love. He describes nonviolence as an activism technique and outlines the goals of the philosophy.

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

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Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.

Monday, May 24, 1965

The Future of Integration

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Dr. King addresses the issue of the Future of Integration to an assembly at the State University of Iowa on November 11, 1959.

Wednesday, November 11, 1959

MLK Address at the AFL-CIO Fourth Constitutional Convention

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Dr. King delivers a speech at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO to address the lack of equality and rights for laborers and people of color. Dr. King encourages those at the convention to remain steadfast in the fight for social justice in order to overcome the mountain of oppression.

Monday, December 11, 1961

Statement by MLK on Jailings

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Dr. King states that there have been blatant violations of constitutional principles in the arresting of nonviolent protesters. He further states that those incarcerated have been subject to beatings.

Thursday, May 9, 1963

Address to the National Bar Association

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Dr. King shares with the National Bar Association of Milwaukee, the history of segregation and why African Americans fight for equality.

Thursday, August 20, 1959

A Statement by Dr. King

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In a statement made in Chicago, Dr. King asks for the economic and social betterment of the individuals living in the "slums" of the city.

Sunday, July 17, 1966

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

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In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

MLK Statement at Peace Event in Geneva

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Dr. King delivered this statement in Geneva at the Pacem In Terris ("Peace on Earth") II Convocation about the "costly, bloody and futile war in Vietnam."

Monday, May 29, 1967

The Chicago Plan

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Dr. King laments over Chicago becoming so much like the South that many African Americans moved north to get away from. Dr. King lays out reasons why African Americans suffer more in Chicago than any other northern city and provides directions to correct the problem.

Friday, January 7, 1966

Statement by MLK

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This document contains Dr. King's remarks on injustices in the state of Mississippi. He suggests a complete boycott if the federal or state government is unable to perform the proper means of justice.

Friday, December 11, 1964

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