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"Correspondence"

"Drop Dead"

This letter, sent to Dr. King, emphasizes a clear disgust with Dr. King's tactics. The author insists that the best thing he could do for his people is "drop dead."

"HLS"

"HLS" believes that Dr. King is wrong in thinking that the Republican Party will do more for African Americans than the Democratic Party.

104:3 General Correspondence 1967 (T)

Richard Tennent Jr. requests that Dr. King consider applying his efforts of non-violence to Cleveland, Ohio "...to help prevent the violence that seems inevitable." Tennent states that he cannot support the Reverend's stance on the Vietnam War, either financially or intellectually.

61:19 General Correspondence 1961 (R)

Maude Reid request a manuscript copy of Dr. King's speech at New Calvary Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan.

94:17 General Correspondence 1966(B)

Mrs. Burke, a representative of the Wisconsin Council of Teachers of English, requests permission to reprint several exerts from the "I Have a Dream" address. The material will be included in the Johnson publication, entitled "The Day They Marched".

A Blind Woman's Request for MLK

Juilia Lockheart, a blind 75 year old woman, requests aid from Dr. King. Many people envisioned Dr. King to be the savior of their time; they would contact him with unrelated requests outside of the non-violent movement in hopes that he could be the remedy to their current issue.

A Born Again Christian writes MLK

The author of this letter, signed "Born Again Christian," urges Dr. King to set his ministry more on God rather than participating in civil rights demonstrations.

A Contentious Telephone Message

William Harold Johnson contacts Dr. King to inform him of a telephone message publicizing controversial information from a number listed in Springfield, Illinois. Mr. Johnson asks Dr. King for advice on how the Council of Churches could contend the information while also mentioning that he and his associates are interested in becoming more familiar with the approach being taken in Chicago.

A Gift from Mr. and Mrs. Digioia to MLK

Greta B. Digioia expresses how she and her husband have come to know Dr. King as a "symbol" of his race. She then offers Dr. King a one-of-a-kind gift.

A Lack of Jewish Soldiers

T.S. D'Amico writes Dr. King and others over what he perceives as a lack of Jewish men being drafted into military service.

A Letter Enclosing an Address by George B. Nesbitt

In an address at the CME Church Conference, George B. Nesbitt analyzes the role of the church during the Civil Rights Movement. During slavery, the church was a place of refuge and hope, but now individuals are beginning to lose their faith in the church.

A Letter to Advisory Council Member from Robert L. Green

In this correspondence, Robert L. Green writes an Advisory Council member concerning the Chicago adult education project. Mr. Green notifies the member that due to a reduced monetary grant from the federal government, the program will officially close.

A Letter to MLK to President Lyndon B. Johsnon

In a letter to MLK, President Lyndon B. Johnson addresses the issue of Federal employment in Atlanta. Johnson informs King of the previous meeting held with the Civil Service Commission and the steps being taken to move forward.

A Prayer to the MLK Family from Robert N. Kellett

Robert N. Kellett, President of the Coral Gables Employees Association, offers a prayer to the King family honoring the life and work of Dr. King.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

A Resolution Directed to the African Methodist Episopal Church

This resolution endorses the appointment of Donald Jacobs as Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.

A Thank You for Their Hospitality

Lawyer William Kunstler writes this thank you to Dr. and Mrs. King and discusses a few legal matters.

A Union Treasurer Writes MLK Regarding the SCLC Convention

Cleveland Robinson, Secretary Treasurer of AFL-CIO District 65 Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, writes to Dr. King with several suggestions for the upcoming SCLC convention.

ABC Letter re Issues and Answers

Peggy Whedon, producer of ABC's "Issues and Answers" program, expresses disappointment that Dr. King may not appear on the show the coming weekend because of a strike.

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Acceptance Letter from Rollan Henry of Tuskegee Institute to Scott B. Smith

In this letter, Mr.Henry informs Mr.Smith that he has been accepted to Tuskegee Institute.

Acknowledgement of Condolences

A standard form of an acknowledgment response, in reference to the receipt of condolences, is highlighted in this document.

Acrostic Poem About MLK

Adolf G. H. Kreiss shows his immense support and gratitude for Dr. King's fight for equality with an acrostic poem using the initials of the civil rights leader.

Adverse Letter about Adam Clayton Powell

An anonymous author asserts that Adam Clayton Powell is not a good leader and he "got in the limelight as he has done by filth."

Adverse Letter from an Anonymous Sender

An unknown sender states their concerns about the direction Dr. King is leading the movement.

Adverse Letter from J. H. Moore to MLK

J. H. Moore expresses his dislike for Dr. King's leadership style. He argues that Dr. King's efforts have stirred up hatred and discontent, even amongst black citizens.

Adverse Letter from Mrs. Arthur Kornoelje to MLK

Mrs. Kornoelje expresses her loss of faith in Dr. King. Kornoelje objects to the negro race as a whole, and feels that 90% of crimes in Grand Rapids are committed by negroes.

Adverse Letter from R. Johnson to MLK

R. Johnson writes to Dr. King wishing physical violence against him. The author refers to Dr. King as "Big Mouth."

Adverse Letter to MLK

In this letter, opposition is asserted as the author places into question Dr. King's decency and religion.

Adverse Letter to MLK

The author of this letter negatively expresses his opinion for Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

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