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"Correspondence"

Letter from Harper & Brothers to MLK

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This letter from Harper & Brothers expresses concerns for the completion of a forthcoming book.

Monday, June 19, 1961

Invitation to Ghana's Independence Celebration

Dr. and Mrs. King were the recipients of a series of invitations to attend celebratory ceremonies to celebrate the independence of Ghana.

Letter from President Johnson to MLK on Assuming Presidency

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President Johnson writes Dr. King thanking him for his sympathetic telegram as he assumes the Presidency and assures him that he will continue the fight for civil rights initiated by President Kennedy.

Monday, December 2, 1963

Letter from Sam Jones to MLK

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In this letter, dated January 11, 1968, Sam Jones expresses his disappointment in Dr. King for not acknowledging his letters. Jones wrote several letters to King asking for assistance in the struggle to restrain the Florida State Legislature's "Lily White" body from writing a new State Constitution.

Thursday, January 11, 1968

Letter to MLK from Raymond Brown

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Raymond Brown writes to Dr. King admonishing him for his affiliations with Adam Clayton Powell and Stokely Carmichael and hopes that these associations are temporary.

Sunday, December 10, 1967

Invitation from Israeli Ambassador to MLK

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In this letter, Avraham Harman invites Dr. King to Israel on behalf of the Embassy of Israel.

Tuesday, March 30, 1965

If I were a Negro

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Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Thursday, March 23, 1967

Letter from MLK to Griffin R. Simmons

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Dr. King informs Mr. Simmons, President of the Consolidate Association, that he will not be able to travel to New York to accept an award from the association due to the struggle in the South.

Wednesday, September 5, 1962

Letter from MLK to A. K. Salz

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Dr. King thanks Mr. Salz for his financial contribution to the SCLC and explains that the contribution will help the SCLC continue its civil rights efforts.

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Letter from Edwin Berry to Jane Lee J. Eddy

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Edwin Berry, Executive Director of the Chicago Urban League, writes Jane Lee Eddy, Secretary of the Taconic Foundation, to request funding for a "get-out-the-vote campaign" in Chicago.

Friday, November 18, 1966

Letter from Mary Hart to MLK

In one of three letters Mary Hart sends Dr. King, she thanks him for his efforts in assisting poor people in America. Hart says that she is representing all poor people and sends apologies that she will not be present for the March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from MLK to Viva O'Dean Sloan

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Dr. King responds to Viva O'Dean Sloan's letter, extending his appreciation for her support of the Congress of Racial Equality. He regretfully informs her he does not know of anyone in the Dearborn, Michigan area who might be interested in the purchase of her property there.

Wednesday, October 17, 1962

Letter from Howard R. Neville to MLK

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Michigan State provost, Howard Neville, tells Dr. King that Dr. Robert Green is available for a one year leave of absence for the Neighborhood Leader Training Program.

Tuesday, June 29, 1965

Letter from Philip E. Jones to MLK

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Philip E. Jones, a SCOPE volunteer, recollects a "terrible night at Canton, Mississippi" where he met Dr. King and was assigned the duty to find Rev. Young. Jones invites Dr. King to speak about civil rights issues at Juniata College where he is enrolled.

Thursday, October 6, 1966

Letter from J. Ross Flanagan to MLK

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Dr. King is invited by the Interreligious Committee on Vietnam to speak at a mass meeting in Washington, DC. A handwritten notation indicates that Dr. King cannot accept the invitation.

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Letter from Bob Bodie to MLK

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Bob Bodie, Choice '68 Chairman at John Brown University, asks Dr. King to send materials about himself for the National Collegiate Presidential Primary. Bodie requests posters, buttons and literature to acquaint the students with Dr. King.

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Lorene Doss Request for MLK Assistance with a Class Project

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Lorene Doss, a high school senior at Sadie V. Thompson, requests the assistance of Dr. King on a project for her government class. The topic of her project is "What are the Main Causes of Poverty".

Monday, February 19, 1968

Letter from Margaret Long to MLK

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Margaret Long asks Dr. King to reconsider his plans for the demonstration in Washington, D.C. She expresses that though she understands why Dr. King advocates for demonstrations, she does not believe it will be advantageous.

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Letter from Neal to Dr. James Cone

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Neal informs Dr. James Cone of a correspondence he found between Dwight Loder and Dr. King.

Tuesday, May 17, 1983

Letter from Helen Ramirez to MLK

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Helen Ramirez of The Brunswick Foundation informs Dr. King that they cannot donate to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Letter from Joe Johnson and Lewis Black to Robert Swann

Members of the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association send this letter of appreciation to the International Independence Institute.

Letter from Joseph A. Howell to MLK

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Mr. Howell requests that Dr. King support the efforts of the United Church of Christ to stop smoking in America.

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Letter from Ivor Liss to MLK

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Ivor M. Liss writes Dr. King and explains his support for the movement that Dr. King is leading. He talks about how being silent would actually hurt Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement. Liss explains that as a Jew he understands the fight for equality as it is something that Jewish people are still fighting for. He encloses a check for $100.00.

Monday, April 15, 1963

Letter from Edmund Stinnes to MLK

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Edmund Stinnes reports a recent visit with his and Dr. King's mutual friends Asha Devi and Dr. E. W. Aryanayakam along with news about other acquaintances. He also shares his excitement about an upcoming meeting with Dr. King. He closes by inviting Dr. and Mrs. King to vacation at his farm in Brazil.

Wednesday, December 9, 1964

Letter to the Honorable Jerome Cavanagh from Gloria Fraction

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Miss Gloria Fraction drafted this response to a correspondence, sent from the Honorable Jerome Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, Michigan. Miss Fraction took the role as an additional secretary for Dr. King, while the SCLC underwent a major Open Housing Campaign Movement in Chicago in 1966. At the time this letter was written, SCLC operated out of their headquarters in Atlanta and their temporary offices in Chicago.

Tuesday, June 7, 1966

Letter from Boston University Graduate School

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Ms. Bessie A. Ring, a representative from the Boston University Graduate School registrar's office, highlights and outlines various changes that have been made to the leaflet on the "Preparation of the Dissertation for the Ph.D. Degree."

Friday, October 9, 1953

Note to MLK

This note is requesting help from Dr. King in finding a candidate to fulfill a pastoral position at a church in Atlanta.

Letter from Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam

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The Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam requests financial support for their mission of ending the war in Vietnam.

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Letter from Gitta Gossman to Dora McDonald

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Gitta Gossman forwards Ms. McDonald two copies of the contract for the Dutch-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King's signature.

Friday, February 26, 1965

Letter From India to MLK

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Ram Aurangabadkar and Dinkar Sakrikar of India write to Dr. King concerning his civil rights efforts in the United States. As a token of appreciation for Dr. King's work, they offer a bronze statue of Gandi on behalf of their society. Aurangabadkar and Sakrikar request that the statue be placed in a children's park.

Friday, June 25, 1965

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