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Negroes See No Future for King as National Leader, Except in Politics

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Almena Lomax discusses the public opinions of African Americans on Dr. King being elected to a national office.

Thursday, August 10, 1967

Soap, Brush Help

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.

Marching for Unilateral Disarmament, San Francisco to Moscow

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This article reports on the six thousand mile march from San Francisco to Moscow, an idea that emerged during a Polaris Action demonstration in New England. The marchers spent six months crossing the United States at a rate of 17 to 25 miles per day for an estimated total of 4,000 miles.

Monday, October 15, 1962

MLK at a Communist Training School

This document depicts prominent civil rights and political leaders allegedly at a communist training school. This anti-King document asks the question, "what kind of American are you?"

Brotherhood Cannot Be a Theory

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This newspaper clipping of The Southern Israelite features segments on the Atlanta banquet honoring Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Given on his return to the States, there were twelve hundred and fifty Atlanta citizens in attendance. Included articles are: welcoming comments by Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, a tribute by Archbishop Paul Hallinan, and a transcription of Dr. King's speech.

Friday, February 19, 1965

Why We Can't Wait Book Review

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This article highlights Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Stride Toward Freedom."

Monday, June 22, 1964

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

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In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Saturday, November 7, 1964

U.S. News & World Report: New Negro Threat

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U.S. News & World Report reports that Dr. King plans on using "civil disobedience on a massive scale," including marches, sit-ins and boycotts in "riot-torn" Northern cities.

Monday, August 28, 1967

Negro Leaders' Mistakes Hurting Civil Rights

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In this article, David Lawrence explains his dissatisfaction with "Negro leaders" for supporting the actions of Adam Clayton Powell, who in Lawrence's mind, has abused his office and trust.

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

WBTV Editorial: "King's Bedfellows"

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The content of this document suggested that Dr. King break ties with leaders Stokley Carmichael and H. Rap Brown, due to their stance on violence as a weapon. At the bottom of this document, is an invitation for Dr. King, H. Rap Brown and Stokley Carmichael to respond.

Monday, February 19, 1968

U.S. Reds Fan Racist Flames To Stir Vietnam War Protest

William F. Buckley, a conservative columnist, decries the involvement of Negro leaders such as Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael n a recent Vietnam War protest. He compares Carmichael with members of the Ku Klux Klan, and he also alleges Communist involvement with the protest.

Statement by MLK Regarding All-White Jury Trials

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Dr. King approves of recent court cases where all-white juries convicted all-white defendants in murder and conspiracy cases. He calls these cases "rays of light and hope," but claims that federal legislation is needed to ensure that discriminatory practices are not involved in impaneling juries.

Friday, December 3, 1965

JFK's Executive Order In Housing

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This document is a draft of an article, written by Dr. King, to be placed in the Amsterdam Newspaper. Dr. King breaks down the housing order signed into law by President Kennedy. He makes clear that housing discrimination is a large hurdle to ending segregation.

Thursday, December 13, 1962

Johnson Said to be Choice of Negroes

Kivie Kaplan, the President of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said that they would be endorsing Johnson for President. Kaplan said their decision was not made lightly, and they will always endorse the candidate who has a principle of equality for all.

"In a Word-Now" by MLK

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In the attainment of civil rights, Dr. King stresses the importance and urgency of "NOW". He further expounds on the immediate and effective actions that should be exercised by the Federal government to better the society.

Sunday, September 29, 1963

Excerpt: "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" 1967

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The "Quote" publication, from Indianapolis, issued a review of Dr. King's last book. Under the heading, "Book Review in Quotes", a preview of 10 quotations from "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" are listed, in this document. Black power, nonviolence and other subject matters are highlighted in the quotations. Dr. King's book was published and released in 1967.

Sunday, July 2, 1967

The Dilemma of The Negro

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Dr. King provides an outlook on the social and political plight of the contemporary Negro. He claims "The challenge is the fact that society expects, indeed demands, that the Negro be as productive, as resourceful, as skillful and as responsible as his white brother who is not handicapped by oppression". He urges Negro citizens to capitalize on current opportunities for advancement. "The negro must not wait until the dawn of absolute emancipation...".

Saturday, January 29, 1966

The Jackie Robinson Saga

This brief biographical sketch highlights Jackie Robinson's life and his accomplishments as a baseball player, Army Lieutenant and business executive.

Civil-Righters Isolation

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David Lawrence states that the recent initiatives of Negro leaders are hindering the overall mission of the Civil Rights Movement. He believes that Negro groups are defeating their own cause.

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Fiercely Upward and Other Newspaper Articles

This document contains a combination of two poems by a principle in Brooklyn, N.Y., and two articles highlighting significant upcoming events of 1963 and 1964. The first article announces the third printing of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" as well as information regarding the release of his forthcoming work "Why We Can't Wait." The second article reports on Mrs. Medgar W. Evers' speaking tour slated to take place in the fall of 1963, just a few months after her husband, the NAACP leader, was slain.

The Catholic Review: Letter From Birmingham Jail

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Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" is printed in this publication along with articles and columns illustrating the Church's civil rights activities. Efforts included priests taking part in direct action to integrate an amusement park and an archbishop backing the civil rights bill.

Friday, July 19, 1963

3000 Jackson Negros Flay Headstart Cutoff

This article discusses the protest of African Americans to the ending of the Headstart nursey program, and the reallocation of those funds to other state programs.

U.S. News and World Report: Is Insurrection Brewing in U.S.?

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This article in the U.S. News and World Report features an interview with Richard H. Sanger, known for his experience in the United States Foreign Service and his abilities to recognize the patterns of political violence.

Monday, December 25, 1967

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

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Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

Sunday, February 20, 1966

WDIX: In Whose Interest Is Changing The Law?

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This editorial was broadcast on WDIX, a radio station based out of Orangeburg, South Carolina, on March 20, 1968. The piece questions if President Johnson's actions in favor of civil rights were under the pressure of Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael, stating that the Great Society is an danger. The author further argues that the status of African Americans as been largely improved, just "not as quickly" as they would have hoped and that should be good enough.

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Special to the New York Times: A Cry of Hate or a Cry for Help

Dr. King addresses the recent riots occurring in the county of Watts near Los Angeles. He believes the riots are not solely race-driven but are also motivated by unemployment. The riots are utilized as a way to be heard, and not as a way to destroy.

"Where Do We Go From Here?" Asks Negro King

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In this article, Palmer Van Gundy reviews Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." He calls the book a must for all Americans, naming Dr. King not just the greatest civil rights leaders, but also a "leader for peace with freedom and justice."

Thursday, February 1, 1968

Newspaper Article: "Giving Away a Library"

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This Chicago's Sunday AMERICAN newspaper article discusses the issue concerning the decision of the Chicago Law Institute to give the government their legal library without the consent of the membership.

Sunday, July 10, 1966

SCLC Newsletter: September 1963

This issue of the SCLC Newsletter covers the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The publication features a number of photographs, editorials and the full text of Dr. King's Washington address.

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