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"Education, MLK"

Thank You Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

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In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays former president of Morehouse College thanks Dr. King for his Founders' Day contribution.

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

MLK Handwritten Note Card - "Peace of Mind or Soul"

In this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "Peace of Mind or Soul," Dr. King quotes Dr. C.G. Jung on the subject of neurosis.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Raphael Demos

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Dr. King writes Harvard University professor Dr. Demos confirming his enrollment in the professor's Philosophy of Plato course. He also thanks Dr. Demos for his "kind words" regarding an article he wrote for "Christianity and Crisis." In addition, Dr. King further extends his regards to Mrs. Demos, whom Mrs. King studied with at the New England Conservatory of Music.

Friday, July 19, 1963

Letter from Alfred K. Barr to MLK

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Alfred Barr, of the Cosmopolitan Club of the University of Georgia Athens, invites Dr. King to speak at their campus, citing the fact that Dr. King was the only Nobel Prize winner from Georgia.

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author of this letter requests the help of Dr. King in dealing with the Principal of W. J. Creel School, who is allegedly a racist and uses racial slurs against his students.

The New Leader: MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

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The New Leader, a New York-based biweekly magazine, published Dr. King?s Letter from Birmingham City Jail. This historic piece is a response to the views of some fellow clergymen that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely.? King's critics had branded him an "outside agitator" and an extremist who should not be advocating lawbreaking. Dr. King responds with this letter and references prominent historical figures to counter these criticisms.

Tuesday, April 16, 1963

MLK Remarks at the NAACP's Civil Rights Rally

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Dr. King addresses the NAACP in regards to the equality of the school systems for Negro students. He urges the crowd to "employ only the highest weapons of dignity and discipline" while continuing to fight against segregation.

Sunday, July 10, 1960

Letter from Sixth Grader to MLK

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Kathy Brewster, an African American sixth grade student from Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude towards Dr. King for helping the Negro race.

Friday, March 12, 1965

Letter from Abraham Lincoln High School to MLK

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Earl Saunders, an art teacher at Abraham Lincoln High School, writes to Dr. King regarding awards of merit for Dr. King's contribution to the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King and Mr. Saunders are both alumni of Boston University's School of Theology.

Wednesday, June 28, 1967

Letter from Areatha G. Bailey to MLK

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Areatha G. Bailey, President of the Highland Park Branch of the NAACP, invites Dr. King to speak at their Freedom Fund Dinner.

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Letter from Neale J. Pearson to MLK

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A Ph.D. candidate from the University of Florida writes Dr. King to tell him about the political and social progress made by the university's Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) chapter. The writer tells Dr. King that the Chapter has invited various political figures to speak at an upcoming lecture series. He extends the invitation to Dr. King and Dr. Charles Anderson, while simultaneously seeking Dr. King's help in contacting Dr. Anderson. The student informs Dr.

Thursday, October 18, 1962

Letter from Moreland Griffith Smith to MLK

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Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee, invites Dr. King or a representative to an open meeting which will be held in Alabama. The purpose of the meeting is to gather information regarding equal protection under the law in areas such as housing, voting, and employment.

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

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In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

Anonymous Letter to MLK

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An unknown author questions Dr. King about his leadership and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. He references various racial, political, and social events, and stresses that Dr. King is responsible for all the riots, violence and looting.

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Letter from Melvin D. Kennedy to MLK

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Melvin D. Kennedy, Editor at Morehouse College, writes Dr. King about the book, "Perspectives in Freedom and Progress, 1863-1963: An appraisal of the Negro's First Hundred Years of Freedom." He explains that the book is a non-profit venture that will add to the Negro narrative and highlight Negro accomplishments. He goes on to request that Dr. King contribute a chapter about the Negro's fight for freedom.

Thursday, February 28, 1963

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

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After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Friday, February 16, 1968

Letter from Edna Patricia Mildred Smith to MLK

Edna Smith, a high school senior, expresses her admiration to Dr. King and his works. She informs of the low ranking she received at a speech contest and asks him to prepare a ten-minute speech for their state contest. She also seeks his advice regarding her academic plans after high school.

Letter from MLK to Herbert Schaltegger

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Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Schaltegger's letter in which he asked for Dr. King's reaction to his theory of equality. Dr. King responds by discussing the injustices committed against Negroes in America and how they have been denied Constitutional rights.

Friday, May 22, 1964

Letter From Walter R. McCall to MLK

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Morehouse School of Religion Director Walter McCall asks Dr. King for a contribution to purchase a piano that will be presented to Morehouse School of Religion.

Tuesday, January 3, 1967

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

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Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

Monday, December 4, 1967

Letter from MLK to Rev. E. Wayne Roberts

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Dr. King writes Rev. E. Wayne Roberts in support of his fellow friend and SCLC Co-Founder Rev. C. K. Steele, Jr. He notes Rev. Steele as "a thorough and competent pastor" that exemplifies the teachings of Jesus Christ.

Sunday, January 3, 1965

Letter from Michael Williams to MLK

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The Chairman of the Society of African and Afro-American Students, at the University of Pennsylvania, extends an invitation to Dr. King to come speak with students during "Black Week."

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Operation Breadbasket Program Hosts MLK

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This program acts as proof of direct action as Dr. King, Reverend Newberry, Reverend Jesse Jackson, and Reverend Johnson present Operation Breadbasket to New Friendship Church.

Thursday, May 26, 1966

MLK in his Study

This is a photograph of Dr. King in his study in Atlanta.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

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Dr. Mays writes to Dr. King regarding the new statement of purpose for Morehouse College.

Friday, October 29, 1965

Letter from J.H. Wheeler to MLK

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J.H. Wheeler requests Dr. King's attendance at the Morehouse College Board of Trustees meeting in New York City.

Wednesday, October 12, 1966

Letter from Clayton Yates to MLK

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Clayton R. Yates informs Dr. King of the Kappa Boule Meeting held on Morehouse College campus with James P. Brawley and Benjamin E. Mays.

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

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Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.

Tuesday, September 3, 1963

Letter from Alice Brainerd to MLK

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Ms. Brainerd criticizes the methods of Dr. King, asserting that "civil disobedience and non-cooperation" are not the best approach to take towards justice.

Saturday, August 19, 1967

Letter from MLK to J. S. Beckington

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Dr. King thanks Mr. J. S. Beckington for his contribution to the SCLC. King also expresses how important the loyal supporters are to his organization.

Wednesday, June 15, 1966

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