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"I have a dream speech"

Draft Speech for Atlanta Nobel Peace Prize Reception

Dr. King drafts a speech that he will make in Atlanta for the reception honoring his Nobel Peace Prize winning. In the speech he offers his gratitude to friends and family who supported him in his efforts. Dr. King also briefly discusses the issue of racial injustice and the continued fight for equality.

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Letter from Napoleon Appleby to MLK

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Napoleon Appleby offers praise and prayers to Dr. King.

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Draft of I Have a Dream

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This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

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In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

Thursday, November 9, 1967

Joan Daves Informs MLK of a Proposal to Print the Speech from the March on Washington

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Joan Daves negotiates with John Avirgan on the royalty percentage for the rights to sale hand-lettered versions of the Speech from the March on Washington.

Friday, October 23, 1964

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

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Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Sunday, June 23, 1963

Unwise and Untimely?

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from E.S. Baker

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E.S. Baker, manager of the Canadian National Railways, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy requesting a copy of Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech. He began the letter by noting that he was an avid admirer of Dr. King and interested in acquiring some of his other recordings.

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Letter from Elsa Wischkaemper McIntyre to MLK

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Elsa McIntyre writes to Dr. King to seek information on how to contribute to his organization. Mrs. McIntyre was moved by Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech and inquires about obtaining a copy.

Sunday, November 3, 1963

Letter from Froydis Kvaerk to MLK

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Norwegian student Froydis Kvaerk requests a copy of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in fulfillment of a class assignment on Dr. King and the civil rights struggle.

Monday, August 29, 1966

I've Been To The Mountaintop

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Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Letter from Irwin Heilner to MLK

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Music composer Irwin Heilner corresponds with Dr. King inquiring about the possibility of composing music and setting it to King's "I Have A Dream" speech.

Thursday, December 19, 1963

MLK in Memoriam

Following Dr. King's assassination, this tribute highlights King's life and the impact he had on the world. It includes a reading from "The Negro American: A Documentary History," an audio recording of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream Speech" and his eulogy. test2

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

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Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.

Tuesday, September 3, 1963

Request to Use "I Have a Dream" Speech in a Musical Composition

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Classical composer Irwin Heilner requests Dr. King's permission to sample the "I Have a Dream" speech in a musical work. Heilner specifies his plans to send the song to musicians in order to get it published, and outlines the terms of the royalties if it is successful. The notes at the bottom of the letter indicate that Dr. King referred Heilner to attorney Clarence Jones regarding use of the speech.

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Elinor G. Galusha Request "I Have a Dream" by Dr. King 1966

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This is letter from Elinor G. Glusha requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in book titled "Words of Faith".

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

Letter from Linda F. Neslage to MLK Regarding the I Have a Dream Speech

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In this letter Linda F. Neslage of Scott Foresman and Company requests Dr. King's permission for non-profit organizations to make special editions of textbooks including his speech, "I Have A Dream."

Monday, April 3, 1967

Letter from Kathy Sasso to MLK

Kathy Sasso, a student at Public School 30 in Staten Island, New York, notifies Dr. King that her class read his "I Have a Dream" speech and named him "Person of the Week." Sasso also requests a copy of one of Dr. King's speeches.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

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This letter, dated October 15, 1964, was written from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald congratulating him on the Nobel Peace Prize. Daves was in negotiation to place his "I Have a Dream" speech on the National Documents Committee.

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Letter from Irwin Heilner to Attorney Clarence Jones

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Irwin Heilner asks Dr. King's attorney for permission to use the "I Have a Dream" speech in one of his songs. He mentions that he previously used words from Langston Hughes in a song on a 50 percent basis and would like the same agreement for the use of Dr. King's speech.

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Letter from MLK to Reverend Casper I. Glenn

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Dr. King writes to Rev. Glenn, President of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, regarding Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech. Dr. King informs him that the Motown Record Corporation has been granted rights of this speech.

Monday, October 21, 1963

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

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Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Letter from Solomon Mendelson to Dora McDonald

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Solomon Mendelson writes to Dora McDonald to inform her that the "I Have A Dream" speech will be televised and that the Congregation of Beth Sholom will be taking action in seeing that it is properly promoted.

Friday, January 5, 1968

Letter to Ms. Dora McDonald from Solomon Mendelson

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Mr. Solomon Mendelson informs the SCLC and Ms. Dora McDonald that CBS will not be televising Dr. King's "I have a Dream Speech."

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

Letter from Reverend Casper Glenn to MLK

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Rev. Casper Glenn, president of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, writes to Dr. King regarding rights to a recording of the "I Have a Dream" speech.

Friday, August 30, 1963

Letter from Joan Daves to Harry H. Wachtel

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Joan Daves sends Mr. Watchel a copy of a proposed Memorandum of Agreement for the distribution of hand lettered copies of Martin Luther King's speech I Have A Dream.

Friday, November 6, 1964

Letter from MLK to Agnes Mack

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Dr. King sends Agnes Mack a form to complete so that she may receive a copy of the "I have a Dream" speech.

Saturday, December 10, 0196

Letter from Frank Randolph Jr. to MLK

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Frank Randolph highlights how Dr. King "brought to light" many things that were once unseen. Mr. Randolph writes this letter subsequent to the assassination of Dr. King and notes that he would like copies of the "I Have a Dream" speech. The writer is apparently unaware of Dr. King's death.

Wednesday, April 17, 1968

Letter from Dora McDonald to Linda F. Neslage

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Dora McDonald informs Linda F. Neslage that she has the permission to print Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in the textbook, "Principles and Types of Speech."

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

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