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Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

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This letter announces that the Gandhi Society for Human Rights, Incorporated is sponsoring a benefit concert, for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, at Carnegie Hal,l in New York City. Harry Belafonte, Frank Sinatra and Lena Horne are listed as some of the spotlight performers for this concert.

Thursday, August 22, 1963

Statement by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee on the Kerner Commission Report

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This statement put forth by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee addresses the results of the Kerner Commission Report, in which the author stresses that without creating viable and integrated communities in our cities "we shall have no cities".

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

Telegram from Gitta Gossmann to MLK

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Gossmann sends Dr. King a royalty check for his book "Why We Can't Wait" in the amount of $3,448.76.

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Professor Andrew Blane Offers Assistance to MLK

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Andrew Blane, Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College, offers to brief Dr. King on the role of religion in Russian culture, particularly the Russian Baptists. He attaches along with his letter, a description of his "scholarly interests and training" for Dr. King to consider.

Saturday, November 4, 1967

Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding

This document provides a detail description of Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding, a candidate for the Democratic primary in the 53rd assembly district.

Letter from Alversia Dunkley to MLK

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Mrs. Dunkley writes Dr. King hoping to receive permission to publish her song, "Man of God," about Dr. King. She also requests contact information for the family of "Miss Viola" to receive permission to publish a poem entitled "Viola."

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

MLK Remarks at the Launching of SCLC's Crusade for Citizenship

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Dr. King delivered this speech at a launch meeting for the Crusade for Citizenship in Miami, Florida. He discusses the denial of African Americans' right to vote by relating it to other former disfranchised Americans such as those who did not own property and women. Dr. King discusses the hypocrisy in some American officials' advocacy of democratic election in other European countries as well as the social and economic welfare of all Americans.

Wednesday, February 12, 1958

Kingdom of God

Dr. King notes the origin of the ideology of God having sovereign rule over the universe.

Letter from MLK to Ray Stewart

Dr. King thanks Ray Stewart for a song written in tribute to the Freedom Movement, but states that neither he nor the SCLC can underwrite the requested fee for use of the song.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

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Roy Wilkins, Chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the conference's executive committee.

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Individualization and Participation

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

The Urban Coalition

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The Urban Coalition's weekly report from the National Coordinator details the newly introduced bill which provides $150 million for summer jobs and anti-poverty programs. The report further discusses the monetary inadequacies for programs involving employment, education, and recreation. A proposal is established by the Office of Economic Opportunity to adhere to the summer programs.

Friday, March 1, 1968

Letter to Ralph D. Abernathy

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Subsequent to the assassination of Dr. King, three posters are erected in San Francisco to express the opposition to his death and the continuance of the movement. Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy is instructed to show these posters to Coretta Scott King at an appropriate time.

Sunday, April 28, 1968

God

Dr. King cites "Totem and Tabu" and "The Future of an Illusion" for Sigmund Freud's view on the origin of the idea of God.

Letter from Marc Pilisuk to MLK

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Marc Pilisuk, Associate Professor of Administrative Science and Psychology at Purdue University, requests Dr. King's permission to reprint the book "The Triple Revolution."

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Statement on Election Returns and White Backlash

Interview about Refusal to Seat Julian Bond

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This is transcript of a question and answer period following a news conference at which Dr. King made a statement regarding the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Julian Bond after Bond announced his support of a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) news release opposing the Vietnam War. King led a protest rally to the state house.

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

Letter from James W. Ealey to MLK

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The Baptist Minister's conference of Richmond and vicinity writes Dr. King, enclosing a contribution of $367.20 for the expenses incurred in the Birmingham struggle.

Friday, June 21, 1963

Letter form Pedro A. Otero Fernandez & Dora E. Cartagen to MLK

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The Rio Piedras' Lawyers Association of Puerto Rico congratulates Dr. King for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. They express how they share Dr. King's same beliefs regarding the three great evils of mankind and hope to spread the movement under his leadership throughout the world.

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

Letter from Joan Baez's Law Firm to MLK

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Singer Joan Baez's law firm expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's recent correspondence.

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

I Have A Dream

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Dr. King delivered the "I Have A Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. Along with Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address," it is considered to be one of the greatest speeches of all time.

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Letter from C. M. Johnson to MLK

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Mrs. Johnson requests Dr. King's help in reinstating Congressman Adam Clayton Powell.

Monday, April 17, 1967

Letter from Myles Horton to Friends of Highlander

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Myles Horton, the co-founder of the Highlander Research and Education Center, explains that he has been working on a program for the Appalachian area. He also mentions that the Center sponsors voter registration, political education programs and a series of workshops to help Negro candidates run for local and state offices.

Friday, December 8, 1967

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

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This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Friday, April 5, 1968

Ode to Freedom

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"Ode to Freedom" is a list of declarations used to inspire and uplift those involved in the movement.

Monday, July 20, 1959

Letter from Edwina C. Johnson to MLK

Edwina C. Johnson claims that the racial problems in the United States are the result of "what is recorded as 'The American Heritage'" and its debasement of African Americans in media, particularly textbooks. Johnson suggests emphasizing the role that African Americans have played in American history. Johnson also provides a list of freedoms that should not be denied to African Americans.

Pamphlet on Benjamin E. Mays

Benjamin E. Mays, the President of Morehouse College, is highlighted in this pamphlet.

Invitation from Saint Vincent College to MLK

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Ralph J. Hils Jr., Director of Assemblies, invites Dr. King to address the student body at St. Vincent's College. He shares a local encounter with discrimination against their American and African Negro students. Mr. Hils outlines the history of the college and provides the names of other prominent visitors of the campus.

Friday, March 8, 1963

A Manual for Direct Action

In this foreword Bayard Rustin provides an introduction into the rules and tips involved in nonviolent action concerning protests. Mr. Rustin describes nonviolent methods that people can use when encountering dangerous or difficult situations.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

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