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"Atlanta, GA"

A Thank You for Their Hospitality

Lawyer William Kunstler writes this thank you to Dr. and Mrs. King and discusses a few legal matters.

A Tribute to the MLK

Several organizations in Stamford, Connecticut sponsor a tribute in honor of Dr. King. This document outlines the program participants, and lists Dr. King as providing the keynote address.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Orientation Agenda

This document outlines the schedule of events during the A. Philip Randolph Institute orientation, an organization focused on racial equality and economic justice.

ABC's Issues and Answers: MLK Interview

Dr. King sat down with Tom Jerriel, Atlanta Bureau Chief, and John Casserly, Washington Correspondent, of the American Broadcasting Company for their program "Issues and Answers." They discussed the civil rights movement, Dr. King's upcoming book, and the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that Dr. King would serve jail time in Birmingham.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Adverse Letter from J. H. Moore to MLK

J. H. Moore expresses his dislike for Dr. King's leadership style. He argues that Dr. King's efforts have stirred up hatred and discontent, even amongst black citizens.

Adverse Letter to MLK

In this letter, opposition is asserted as the author places into question Dr. King's decency and religion.

Adverse Postcard

The author of this postcard questions the concept of Black Power and informs Dr. King of his dismay for integration.

Adverse Postcard to MLK

American Opinion illustrates a propaganda postcard of Dr. King that accuses him of being a communist. The photo on the postcard was taken at the Highlander School in 1957 which trained leaders in nonviolent passive resistance.

Advertisement for Ku Klux Klan Segregation Meeting

This advertisement invites every white person who supports segregation to attend an upcoming meeting sponsored by the Ku Klux Klan.

Advertisement for Mrs. King's Upcoming Appearance

This flyer serves as an advertisement for Mrs. Coretta Scott King's upcoming public appearance at the First African Baptist Church. Mrs. King wishes to honor every Freedom Fighter who was imprisoned during a civil rights demonstration.

African American Unity in Atlanta, Georgia

The author of this document discusses why it is imperative for African Americans to not only stand in unity against the injustices of society, but to also be informed about the issues in which they strive to prevail against. Information about school integration, housing discrimination, and taxation is offered in the conclusion of the document.

Agenda for the SCLC State and Local Leaders

This agenda outlines several topics discussed for the Southwide Meeting of State and Local Leaders. Dr. King, the President of the SCLC, spoke on SCLC's 'People to People' Program.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

In this 1967 speech to the Hungry Club, Dr. King addresses America’s chief moral dilemma by focusing on three major evils: racism, poverty, and war.

American Education: Segregation, Northern Style

This article from American Education focuses on the problem of de facto segregation in Northern and Southern cities that results from discrimination in housing and contributes to further housing discrimination and minority unemployment. De facto segregation is as detrimental as legalized (de jure) segregation. The author provides an overview of efforts around the country to eliminate segregation in public schools and some of the difficulties encountered.

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

An Ambitious Dream Confronts Reality

Dr. King talks about the Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE) as well as the political changes that have occurred in Georgia.

An Analysis of the Ethical Demands of Integration

Dr. King argues that desegregation is only the first step towards the ultimate goal of complete racial equality. He explains that nonviolence, driven by the power of love, is crucial to create true integration.

An Appreciation Dinner

This dinner salutes the outstanding service of the SCLC staff. It includes menu items for the gathering as well as a schedule of guest speakers and attendees.

An Evening of Music

The English family provides Ebenezer Baptist Church with "An Evening of Music" in the spring of 1962.

An Evening of Negro Culture and History

This booklet, entitled "Black is Beautiful and It's So Beautiful To Be Black," contains information from an SCLC event held August 16, 1967 that sought to explore Negro culture and history.

An Interview With MLK

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

Annual Record and Report of Life and Work

This document is a blank "Annual
Record and Report of Life and Work" for the American Baptist Convention. Had it been filled out, it would have contained information about the activities of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Annual Report by MLK

Dr. King illustrates in his annual report the innovative changes that have occurred within the country, as well as the world. He also expresses the Republican stand point on civil rights and the constant concern of racism.

Annual Report Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Operation Breadbasket, unemployment, poverty, nonviolence, Negro voter registration, and a financial report are just several of the topics covered in this informational pamphlet detailing the ways in which monies were divided amongst the many functions of the SCLC.

Annual Report of The President: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

In the SCLC's Annual Presidential Report, Dr. King chronicles a decade of organization's activities to eliminate segregation. The report was delivered at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC.

Anonymous Card and Article to MLK

An anonymous sender encloses an article written about Dr. King and his anti-Vietnam War sentiments.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author writes Dr. King and questions his motives for speaking so "rashly" against the conflict in Vietnam.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An individual finds it insulting that Dr. King is compared to Abraham Lincoln and would like Dr. King to be remembered as a traitor.

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