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Southern Christian Leadership Conference--Relations with Government Officials

Associated Archive Content : 210 results

1965 Annual Board Meeting for SCLC

This document details the agenda at the Annual Board Meeting for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Address By Senator Edward M. Kennedy to the SCLC

Senator Edward M. Kennedy highlights Dr. King's efforts during the Civil Rights Movement. He also expresses concerns about poverty, unemployment, nonviolence, segregation and integrity.

Address for the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights

This address was delivered by Dr. King at the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights event on May 17, 1962. Dr. King opens by discussing various anniversaries that coincide with the event and represent similar struggles for justice including the Supreme Court school desegregation ruling, the Emancipation Proclamation, and Henry David Thoreau's death.

Declaration of "Nobel Peace Prize Day" Desired

This press release announces the Virginia State Unit of the SCLC's appeal to Governor Albertis Harrison in hopes that he will establish a "Nobel Peace Prize Day" in honor of Dr. King. The proposed day will possibly be held in conjunction with a speech Dr. King will deliver at Virginia State College and the Virginia SCLC State Convention.

Declaration of Independence by MLK

Dr. King writes an article making reference to the Emancipation Proclamation, President Lincoln, and the historical impact they both have had on the economy and what is described to be a social revolution. It is noted that this article is intended for a December, 1962 issue of a publication.

Dr. Abernathy Appeals to New Governor of Alabama

Ralph David Abernathy, vice-president of the SCLC, issues a press release concerning the federal governments decision to halt funding to the state of Alabama for noncompliance with the 'law of the land'. Abernathy appeals this decision and asserts that the blame should be directed towards local government officials such as George C. Wallace.

Draft Statement of Reverend Dr. MLK Jr.

This statement, not written in Dr. King's hand, responds to Joseph Alsop's syndicated column in the New York Herald Tribune. Dr. King clarifies that SCLC has no affiliation with the Communist Party. He also states the SCLC has not continued a relationship with Jack O'Dell since he was relieved of his responsibilities.

Fact Sheet on the Raid of the SCEF

This document highlights the raid on the New Orleans headquarters of the Southern Conference Educational Fund by State and City Police.

Housing Report to the SCLC Board of Directors

Members of the SCLC Board of Directors were the recipients of this detailed report outlining solutions to end the slum crisis in the North.

King and SCLC Meet in Montgomery

This press release announces a mass meeting held in Montgomery, Alabama by the Executive Board of SCLC. The meeting was held in response to a major libel suit against four prominent SCLC officials. Dr. King gives an address to boost morale during the course of this suit. In Dr. King's view, "The South has lost its solidity. Whites fight against whites over desegregation. Be it known, evil cannot permanently organize itself." The libel suit came to be known as the New York Times Company vs. Sullivan (1960).

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

A. Phillip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, writes to Dr. King enclosing a letter to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Mr. Randolph addresses concerns of nationwide rioting in retaliation to social and economic oppression.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization, asks Dr. King to appear at a congressional hearing about the problems facing urban cities. He explains that the subcommittee does not understand the full psychological, social and economic conditions that challenge people living in urban areas.

Letter From Ambassador Avraham Harman to MLK

Ambassador Harman congratulates Dr. King for his aspirations concerning an "American Negro Pilgrimage" to Israel. He praises Dr. King for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize, and discusses the importance of his leadership in this proposed project for peace.

Letter from Annie Emehel to Dr. King

In this letter, Mrs. Annie Emehel wishes Dr. King success, in his upcoming trip to Nigeria. Dr. King was going to Nigeria to try to help the government and Biafra find a solution to their disagreements. Mrs. Emehel states that she has confidence that Dr. King will be able to help both sides come to a resolution.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, responds to Dr. King's telegram regarding the assault of Rev. Paul Chapman. Marshall informs him that evidence has failed to disclose any "violation of a federal criminal statute," so the Department of Justice is unable to take action.

Letter from Assistant Deputy Attorney General William A. Geoghegan to MLK

William Geoghegan, Assistant Deputy Attorney General, thanks Dr. King for his telegram recommending L. N. D. Wells, Jr. to the Fifth Circuit of the United States Court of Appeals.

Letter from Attorney General Robert Kennedy to MLK

Attorney General Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a copy of his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee about civil rights legislation.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall informs Dr. King that the Department of Justice is investigating the assault upon Reverend Paul Chapman.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK Regarding Paul Chapman

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in reference to a previous telgram correspondence concerning an assault on Reverend Paul Chapman. Burke writes that his department can take no action due to a lack of evidence indicating a crime.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Dept. of Justice, responds to Dr. King's telegram requesting a Federal investigation concerning an incident involving Mr. Toomes Clendon and Sheriff W. E. Hammond. In closing, Marshall assures the Reverend that appropriate action will be taken should a violation be involved.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a recent telegram concerning an investigation in the alleged assault upon Miss Shirley Gaines by an Albany police officer.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King in response to a telegram sent by the Reverend protesting action be taken by the State of Louisiana against the Southern Conference Educational Fund.

Letter from C. Summer Stone Jr. to MLK

Chuck Stone, assistant to New York Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, follows up with Dr. King about a telephone conversation between Powell and Dr. King. The discussion centered on Dr. King preaching at Abyssinian for the anniversary service. Stone reiterates Powell's hopes that Dr. King will be able to participate.

Letter from Charles A. Halleck to MLK

Charles A. Halleck expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter outlining his reasons for opposing the seating of the five congressmen for the state of Mississippi.

Letter from Charles H. Percy to MLK

U.S. Senator Charles H. Percy expresses his appreciation for Dr. King, while also expressing his hope that the senate will soon pass a housing bill.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr to MLK

Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. thanks Dr. King for his previous telegram in support of the discharge petition on home rule for the District of Columbia. The home rule gives some of congress' power over the district to the local government. The petition was finally approved in 1973.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Congressman Mathias of Maryland thanks Dr. King for his recent letter urging him to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. Although Mathias' vote against the seating was defeated, he states that the mere challenge to it "has drawn once again the attention of the American public to this unfortunate situation."

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Maryland Congressman Charles M. Mathias thanks Dr. King for his letter regarding the Representative's recent trip to Selma, Alabama. As a result of his visit, Congressman Mathias informs Dr. King that he prepared and introduced civil rights legislation to the latest House of Representatives session.

Letter from Charles S. Joelson to MLK

Congressman Joelson of New Jersey responds to Dr. King's recent letter urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. He informs Dr. King that he shares his view and was one of the 148 members who voted against it.

Letter from Clair Callan to MLK

Representative Callan of Nebraska writes Dr. King to thank him for his recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. After giving serious consideration to Dr. King's recommendation to vote against seating the Mississippi Congressman, Callan states that he came to the conclusion that "a refusal to seat the Delegation in question would not further the cause of the Negro in that state," and consequently voted for the seating.

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