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Southern Christian Leadership Conference--Relations with Government Officials

Associated Archive Content : 210 results

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey informs Dr. King of scheduling complications that will delay his response to Dr. King's request to address the SCLC.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey commends Dr. King on the work of the Urban Coalition. He also informs Dr. King of his intent to work together to meet common goals.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK about an Invitation

In this letter, Mr. Hubert Humphrey, Vice President of the United States, writes to Dr. King declining his invitation to address the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK

Mr. Sandperl writes to Dr. King regarding the direction of the SCLC. He suggest that the SCLC continue to represent social change and uphold the principles of nonviolence. However, in order to succeed, Mr. Sandperl believes that it should be done from a universal view, instead of from a Negro perspective.

Letter from J. Edgar Hoover to MLK

J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, sends his thanks for Dr. King's telegram concerning the recent work of FBI agents in Alabama.

Letter from Jacob H. Gilbert to MLK

Congressman Gilbert writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter and copy of his book "Why We Can't Wait." Prior to the vote to seat the Mississippi delegation, Dr. King contacted several government officials urging them to vote against the seating. Congressman Gilbert states that he objected to the seating albeit unsuccessfully.

Letter from Jacob Javits to MLK

Senator Jacob Javits expresses his gratitude for an inscribed book that Dr. King sent him.

Letter from James H. Scheuer to MLK

James H. Scheuer, a representative of the United States Congress, informs Dr. King about the dismissal of the Mississippi challenge. Despite this action, Scheuer asserts that the attention received is a victory within itself. He concludes by stating "We must all work together to insure maximum enforcement of the Voting Rights Bill".

Letter from John A. Blatnik to MLK

John A. Blatnik, Chair of the Democratic Study Group, writes Dr. King thanking him for his recent letter indicating his support for Blatnik's position on civil rights.

Letter from John A. Race to MLK

Congressman Race of Wisconsin thanks Dr. King for his letter concerning the seating of the Mississippi Delegates. Race seems to suggest that he was of the majority who "did authorize their formal acceptance" although he states that he was in the "minority."

Letter from John Conyers to MLK

John Conyers, Congressman-Elect for the first district of Michigan, writes Dr. King seeking advice and endorsement for his campaign.

Letter from John R. Hanson to MLK

Congressman Hansen of Nebraska thanks Dr. King for the telegram he sent urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Democratic Representative informs Dr. King that he was one of the 86 Congressmen "who requested a roll call vote on the issue."

Letter from John W. Wydler to MLK

Congressman Wydler of New York responds to Dr. King's letter on the seating of the Mississippi delegation to Congress. Dr. King's letter, sent to several government officials prior to the vote, urges House Representatives to vote against the seating of the current delegation.

Letter from Jonathan B. Bingham to MLK

Congressman Bingham of New York replies to Dr. King's donation solicitation letter requesting a renewal of the previous year's fifty dollar contribution to SCLC. The congressman states that he would like to know whether contributions will be used to influence foreign policy before committing to a decision.

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Joseph S. Clark, Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty, writes Dr. King to request his testimony. Dr. King's speech would serve as a preface to the hearing on public service and private enterprise employment/training programs.

Letter from Joseph Sittler to MLK

Joseph Sittler requests feedback from Dr. King regarding the McCarran Act. The McCarran Act dealt with subversive activities and was passed in 1950. Sittler encloses a reply card for Dr. King's convenience.

Letter from L. Howard Bennett to MLK

L. Howard Bennett writes Dr. King and encloses statistical information regarding African American involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from Martin J. McNamara to MLK

Martin McNamara, Special Counsel to the Vice President, informs Dr. King that the Vice President regrets that he is unable to accept an invitation to address the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Maurice Dawkins, Assistant Director for Civil Rights of the Office of Economic Opportunity, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting aimed at funding summer projects for riot-prone cities. Mr. Dawkins has already encouraged President Johnson to help fund $75 million for summer programs.

Letter from MLK to Ambassador Adlai Stevenson

Dr. King thanks Adlai Stevenson, America's ambassador to the UN, for sponsoring a reception in his honor following his trip to Oslo to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. He commends Stevenson on his dedication to promote peace and reason in helping to solve world problems.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy requesting an investigation in Williamston, NC to relieve the Negro community from violence and "unconstitutional police action."

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

Letter from MLK to Daniel K. Inouye

Dr. King commends Hawaiian Senator Daniel K. Inouye for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Frank Carlson

Dr. King writes Kansas Senator Frank Carlson to applaud his vote for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Ivan Allen Jr.

Dr. King writes Mayor Allen regarding a seemingly unfair price quota for the Atlanta Municipal Auditorium that the SCLC plans to use for the Harry Belafonte concert.

Letter from MLK to J. Howard Edmondson

Dr. King writes Oklahoma Senator James Howard Edmondson to express appreciation for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Jonathan B. Bingham

Dr. King responds to Congressman Bingham's request for information concerning SCLC's position on foreign policy matters and donor contributions. Dr. King informs the congressman that the organization decided at a recent convention to "have SCLC abstain from foreign policy matters," in order to preserve its civil rights objectives and donor's trust. However, Dr. King states that SCLC permits individual employees to assume whatever position they choose regarding foreign policy matters, and contributes his public statements concerning Vietnam to this privilege.

Letter from MLK to Maurine B. Neuberger

Dr. King writes Oregon Senator Maurine B. Neuberger to express gratitude for her support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Moreland Griffith Smith, Sr.

Dr. King thanks Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee to the US Commission Civil Rights, in advance for advising him at the upcoming meeting. Dr. King states that he is sending Reverend Andrew Young to represent the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Nelson Rockefeller

Dr. King takes the opportunity to thank New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller for his tremendous contribution to SCLC. He expresses that the struggle couldn't have survived without friends like Gov. Rockefeller and looks forward to their September 7, 1962 meeting.

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