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Civil Rights Demonstrations

Associated Archive Content : 313 results

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

MLK Requests Federal Protection from US Attorney General

Dr. King sends this urgent request for protection to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. Negro citizens were brutalized while protesting the arrest of James Orange. Alabama State Troopers prevented protestors from seeking medical attention by refusing to allow them to leave Zion Methodist Church.

MLK Responds to Questions Pertaining to the Civil Rights Movement

Dr. King responds to a series of questions concerning such topics as his opposition to the Vietnam War, the direction of the Civil Rights Movement, urban riots in Detroit and Newark, and SCLC initiatives catered to the ghettos of the American South.

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.

MLK Statement Regarding Housing Proposal in Chicago

Robert Clifton Weaver, the first United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, encloses a statement made by Dr. King for Joseph Califano, assistant to President Johnson. Dr. King announces a slum area housing redevelopment project in the Chicago areas of Lawndale, East Garfield Park and Kenwood Oakland.

MLK's Gadsden, Alabama Rally Speech

This transcript of Dr. King's address during the Gadsden, Alabama Rally addresses the ills of segregation in the South. He professes that the accusation of civil rights demonstrations being responsible for creating tension is equivalent to blaming the act of robbery on the wealth of man.

MLK's Mandate for White Christians Review

Dr. King provides a review for Kyle Hazelden's book, "Mandate for White Christians." In his review he gives an overview of the book's content, along with his opinion on its value.

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

More and Faster

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.

MSGR. Victor G. Moser's Statements Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Victor G. Moser recounts the activities that took place during the march on Montgomery ,which was one of a serious, dedicated, even religious commitment to a project which would really bring out the serious injustice being perpetrated upon a persecuted and disadvantaged people.

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

NAIRO Supports March for Freedom

The National Association of Intergroup Relations Officials declares their support of the March for Freedom in Washington, D.C. NAIRO urges its members to support the march for the integration of over "20,000,000 Americans of minority identity."

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

National Student Christian Federation Bulletin

The National Student Christian Federation released several bulletins and informational letters regarding the student demonstrations in the 1960s. Herluf Jensen, General Secretary of the NSCF, provides readers with the progress of different trials related to the movement, arrest statistics and institutions involved. Obtaining strong civil rights legislation through Congress is discussed as well.

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

Negroes See No Future for King as National Leader, Except in Politics

Almena Lomax discusses the public opinions of African Americans on Dr. King being elected to a national office.

New York Mayor Wagner Remarks at Reception

New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner honors Dr. King at a reception following a ceremony where he was presented the Medallion of Honor of the City of New York after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The Mayor especially commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership in nonviolence and the spirit of love, goodwill, and peacemaking that he brings to the struggle for racial justice.

New York Times: The Case Against Tokenism

In this article for the New York Times, Dr. King writes of his experiences in an Albany, GA jail. Furthermore, he submits the idea that a delayed response to integration and equality for all is no longer acceptable due to the Negro having a "new sense of somebodiness."

News from the AFL-CIO: Labor News Conference

AFL-CIO's public affairs program, the Labor News Conference. Donald Slaiman, Director of the AFL-CIO's Department of Civil Rights was questioned by Alan Adams of Business Week Magazine and Stanley Leward of Scripps-Howard Newspapers. The three have a discussion about apprenticeship opportunities for minority youths, particularly of Negro and Puerto Rican heritage.

News/Letter: Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence

Here is a 1967 newsletter from the Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence, covering a number of topics including the Vietnam War, the March on Washington, fascism, and non-violent tactical plans.

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Note from Will Dale to MLK

Will Dale writes Dr. King commending him for encouraging Black athletes to boycott the Olympic games.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

Pamphlet About the Black Panther Party

This pamphlet contains historical and contextual references to the Black Panther Party. It also includes a speech by John Hulett and an interview of Stokely Carmichael highlighting the political and social movements occurring in Lowndes County, Alabama.

People In Action : "Birmingham Part 2"

Dr. King, along with the SCLC, devises a plan to stop government officials from shutting down public facilities. Dr. King goes on to discuss the racism in Albany and plans to generate peace with the white communities.

People in Action: A Look To 1964

Dr. King writes this article looking forward to the new year of 1964. He notes that all the activity and accomplishments in 1963 set the tone for what is to come in the following year. Though "the Negro as a community has increased his skills tremendously in quantity and quality," there is still much work to be done. King references the civil rights legislation that currently stands before Congress. Among other topics, he also states that there are efforts to broaden the power of the Negro consumer market.

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