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Civil Rights Demonstrations

Associated Archive Content : 313 results

People in Action: Albany Justice

Dr. King discusses numerous injustices in Albany, a pacifist movement to Cuba, and police brutality against Negroes.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

People to People

Dr. King announces the SCLC's launching of a People to People tour of four northern cities. The SCLC launched this tour in the north to display a concern for the "moral welfare of Northern Negroes."

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.

People-to-People Tour: Philadelphia

This itinerary details Dr. King's schedule during his stay in Philadelphia.

Photo of MLK and Mr. David

Mr. David sends Dr. King a picture displaying the two outside a Jackson, Mississippi Holiday Inn.

Photograph Outline for "Why We Can't Wait"

This draft outlines the images and captions used in Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait." Some of the material incorporated includes images and descriptions of Dr. King at the 1963 March on Washington, the Birmingham Campaign, other heavily involved civil rights leaders, and Dr. King's family.

Points for Progress, Birmingham, Alabama

This is a list or outline of points for progress in the Birmingham Campaign. They may have been used in a face-to-face presentation with local community leaders or with media officials. These words carefully enumerate the demands or wishes of the civil rights leaders and the Negro community.

Prayer by Dean L. Harold DeWolf at Civil Rights Rally

This is a prayer by Dr. King's doctoral advisor, Dean L. Harold DeWold of Wesley Theological Seminary, given at the Civil Rights Rally on the Capitol grounds in Jackson, Mississippi.

Prayer Pilgrimage

Various quotes are cited surrounding Dr. King's perception on love, nonviolence, spirituality, Montgomery, and more. Dr. King elaborates on the history of Montgomery and its direct relation to slavery. Ebony Magazine releases the exclusive eight-point "Plan for Freedom" for Montgomery, calling Negros to mobilize for an all-out assault on segregation."The Death of Evil' is also cited which correlates such evil with details from the book of Exodus.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Prospective Negotiation Procedure with Merchants

This draft document outlines a plan to eradicate racial discrimination during the Civil Rights Movement. It includes a detailed list of prospective negotiation procedures with merchants and a timeline for events in Birmingham, Alabama.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

Recent Court Guidelines Concerning Demonstrations

This memorandum outlines recent legislation that permits "street demonstrations as an exercise of freedom of speech and of assembly." Specific court cases in the state of Alabama are also mentioned throughout the text.

Refinement by Fire

R. Elizabeth Johns describes the events surrounding voter registration in the South and tactics used by civil rights and opposition leaders.

Report to Agenda Committee

Junius Griffin sends Bill Berry a report and tentative program regarding summer events in Chicago during the 1966 Civil Rights Campaign.

Reverend Walter E. Fauntroy's Keynote Address to the SCLC

Reverend Walter E. Fauntroy's keynote address to the SCLC informs his listeners of the trials and the triumphs of African-Americans in the US. Fauntroy focuses primarily on the subject nonviolence and provides his listeners with a summary of the progress that blacks have made since the start of the Civil Rights Movement.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

SCLC Continues Economic Withdrawal Against National Industries In Alabama

Featured in this Western Christian Leadership Conference newsletter, is an article by Junius Griffin regarding the SCLC. "SCLC Continues Economic Withdrawal Against National Industries In Alabama," describes the reasons and the situations in which the SCLC had to "use the nonviolent economic campaign as an expression of moral indignation and an appeal to the nation's conscience."

SCLC Launches Chicago Political Drive

The SCLC releases a statement regarding the launching of a Chicago Political Drive, sponsored by the SCLC and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations. SCLC Southern Project Director, Hosea Williams, will head the campaign. The focuses of this campaign are voter registration and education.

SCLC News Bulletin

This SCLC bulletin to supporters details the organization's progress in numerous locations, including its growing presence in northern cities such as Cleveland, Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, and the Citizenship Education Program. A "Fiscal Facts" section stresses that Dr. King receives no salary from SCLC, nor any other income from his work with the organization.

SCLC News Release - MLK Statement on Continued Racial Violence in Alabama

This 1966 SCLC news release contains a statement from Dr. King concerning further racial violence in Birmingham, Alabama and the need for prompt action.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

SCLC Newsletter: March 1963

This is the SCLC's 1963 Spring Newsletter. Articles include: "The 22 Billion Dollar Giant" and "Solid Wall of Segregation Cracks at Albany."

SCLC Newsletter: March 1963

SCLC highlights its affiliate activities, fundraisers and efforts to rebuild burned churches in this newsletter from March of 1963. One of the cover stories focuses on the repeal of segregation laws in Albany, Georgia. The "Profile of the Month" article features Milton A. Reid and discusses his contributions to the Civil Rights Movement.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1964

The March, 1964 SCLC newsletter reports many news items, including a voter registration drive in Alabama, the results of several legal cases, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, an article criticizing Judge Durwood T. Pye and the use of interracial primers in Detroit's public schools.

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1963

This issue of the SCLC Newsletter covers the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The publication features a number of photographs, editorials and the full text of Dr. King's Washington address.

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