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March of Poor People to Washington (1968)

Associated Archive Content : 93 results

"Rev. King Jumps Back into the Act"

This article expresses how Dr. King wants to take the attention off of the militants and place the focus back on non-violent expression.

Annual Report (Urban America Inc.)

This card references the Poor People's March on Washington of 1968.

Anonymous Letter to Paul Abernathy

The anonymous author of this letter addresses a "Paul" Abernathy to speak against the March of the Poor People's Campaign after Dr. King's death. The author makes statements suggesting that the efforts on behalf of Abernathy are forced upon the government through such demonstrations.

Answers in the American Way

This text derives from a television show outlining the facts of the Black Panther Party. In attendance were civil rights activist like Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, H. Rapp Brown and their affiliates within the Civil Rights Movement.

Banner at "Poor People's March," Washington, D.C. June, 1968

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Chicago Daily Defender: SCLC Aide Makes Spirited Capital March Call Here

The Chicago Daily Defender published this article about Rev. Ralph Abernathy's visit to Chicago to promote the Poor People's Campaign. According to Abernathy, "Come this summer, thousands of poor Americans are going to take their burdens to the White House and they'll leave them with LBJ."

Crisis In the Nation

Dr. King and Joseph E. Lowery inform an anonymous recipient of an urgent meeting of the SCLC Executive Board.

Face the Nation Interview

This is a transcript of an August 1965 interview of Dr. King on the CBS television news program Face the Nation. King is asked to comment on numerous issues facing American society including the conflict in Vietnam, civil rights, housing and birth control.

Final Plans for the Washington Poor People's Campaign

This document outlines the dates, times, places and events that will take place in preparation for the Washington Poor People's Campaign.

Hruska Says Capital...

Nebraska Senator Roman Hruska criticizes the Dr. King-led demonstrations and asserts that the government does not really know what the demonstrator's goals are.

Information about Poor People's Campaign

The Poor Peoples Campaign asserts that it will demand decent jobs and income for poor Americans of all races and ethnicities. Furthermore the Campaign vows to address constitutional and moral rights, along with the rights of exploited immigrants.

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

Lace Laird Affirms his Support for MLK

Lace Laird wrote to Dr. King acknowledging that he stood with Dr. King at multiple marches in Detroit. He further rendered his services to Dr. King for SCLC's 1968 Poor Peoples March on Washington.

Letter from Alice Cooper to MLK

Mrs. Cooper expresses agreement with Dr. King's article in the May 1967 edition of "The Progressive," which discussed the inherit injustice in using "black and white" as names for races. She also sends a copy of an article she wrote that suggests some alternate names.

Letter from Ann Raynolds to MLK

Ann Raynolds writes Dr. King informing him of her support for the upcoming Poor People's March to Washington. She also encloses a contribution.

Letter from Annis Pratt to MLK

Professor Annis Pratt of Spelman College writes about her support for the proposed Poor People's Campaign. She suggests that the problems traditionally associated with race may be more economic in nature, and encloses a check from her husband and herself for the march.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

Letter from Chester Harness to MLK

Chester Harness expresses to Dr. King his interest of being an honorary member of SCLC. He explains that due to the Vietnam War he can not make a financial contribution but he would like to contribute by participating in the Poor People's Campaign of 1968.

Letter from Constance A. Price to MLK

In this letter, Ms. Price writes to Dr. King to request that he makes mention of the blatant injustices committed by the State of Colorado, to its citizens, during the "poor people's campaign" in Washington, D.C.

Letter from E.E.H. to Reverend Ralph Abernathy

The author of this letter speaks out against the efforts of Reverend Abernathy, calling the March on Washington a cheap show and calling for an end to civil rights demonstrations in general.

Letter from George Y. Sodowick to MLK

George Sodowick expresses to Dr. King disapproval of the planned Poor Peoples Campaign of 1968. Sodowick suggests that, instead of occupying Washington, the demonstrators should settle in and enhance "riot torn cities."

Letter from Harry Daniels to MLK

Harry Daniels stresses the urgency of an American withdrawal from Asia and proposes appointing Dr. King as special ambassador to North Vietnam.

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.

Letter from J. M. Lawson Jr. to MLK

Minister J. M. Lawson Jr. served as director of nonviolent education for SCLC from 1960 to 1967. In this letter to Dr. King he expresses concerns about program efforts for the summer and fall seasons. Mr. Lawson is conscious of the necessary redirection of the project and informs Dr. King that he has recommendations.

Letter from J. Reynolds to MLK

J. Reynolds expresses his opinion on Dr. King's recent activism in Memphis and describes it as a "riot." Mr. Reynolds questions Dr. King's intentions and highlights the negative outcome of the demonstration.

Letter from John C. Hall to MLK about a March

In this letter John C. Hall informs Dr. King of his desire to participate in the upcoming march to Washington D.C. and requests any information regarding such.

Letter from John T. Walker to MLK

On behalf of the Washington Cathedral. John Walker extends an invitation for Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and articulate the true premise of the Poor People's Campaign to their congregation. Walker believes that Dr. King's physical presence will help eliminate doubts that this civil disobedience campaign will turn to violence. Dr. King is would eventually preach the final sermon of his life on March 31 at the Washington Cathedral under the subject "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Letter from Leon Hall to William Rutherford

Leon Hall writes William Rutherford requesting additional per diem fees for SCLC's Mississippi field staff.

Letter from Linda Witt to MLK

Linda Witt, who is conducting research for a school project, asks Dr. King questions about his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

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