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Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

Called To Responsible Freedom

Mount Olivet sponsors a youth week program of Christian education featuring Dr. King as a keynote speaker.

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Founders Day Address

Dr. King addresses Spelman College at their Founders Day celebration. He discusses issues such as the Promised Land and the function of education.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from Harry Fleischman to MLK

Harry Fleischman suggests a text that may be of interest to Dr. King, entitled "We Are Not Summer Patriots." The text highlights anti-Semitism and other efforts to attain equality.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from Ned French to MLK

A high school student requests the political opinions of several famous individuals concerning the national issues and potential candidates of the 1968 presidential election.

Letter from PLAYBOY Magazine to MLK

Playboy Editorial Director A.C. Spectorsky requests comments from Dr. King regarding Kenneth Tynan's article "Open Letter to an American Liberal," which accompanies the letter.

Letter from Thomas Bradley to MLK

Thomas Bradley, Los Angeles' Tenth District Councilman, requests Dr. King's support with a fundraising campaign.

Letter from Victor J. Schoenbach to MLK

Victor Schoenbach writes Dr. King expressing his support for Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War in the midst of dissenters.

MLK on the New York Riots

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.

MLK Press Conference and Speech Notes

Dr. King stresses that his appearance to Cleveland is not in the interest of the candidates but to urge the people to exercise their political and moral responsibility.

MLK Public Statement on the Poor People's Campaign

Dr. King announces several initiatives of the SCLC. He explains that due to severe displays of discrimination the SCLC and other organizations will continue the non-violent movement with a demonstration in Washington, D.C. Dr. King further paints the picture of inequality among the races by providing several illustrations of discrimination.

MLK Statement about the New York Riots

Dr. Kind addresses the press' claim that civil rights leaders are involved in the outbreak of riots in New York. He says that violence creates more social problems than it solves. He says that government officials need to take responsibility and help all American citizens gain justice and equality.

MLK's Address to Addison Junior High

Dr. King explains the importance of education and encourages the students to exercise their abilities to the fullest and strive for excellence. Dr. King further describes the duties each student must fulfill to make an impact on their community and the world.

Modern Day Samson

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

Mt. Zion Baptist Church Third Annual Lecture Series

The Mount Zion Baptist Church presents Dr. King as the key note speaker for their Third Annual Lecture Series. The lecture series will provide the community with a conscientious perspective of the societal issues as recognized by Dr. King. Furthermore, this event will bring aid to the Building Program of Mount Zion.

Negroes See No Future for King as National Leader, Except in Politics

Almena Lomax discusses the public opinions of African Americans on Dr. King being elected to a national office.

New York Mayor Wagner Remarks at Reception

New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner honors Dr. King at a reception following a ceremony where he was presented the Medallion of Honor of the City of New York after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The Mayor especially commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership in nonviolence and the spirit of love, goodwill, and peacemaking that he brings to the struggle for racial justice.

Newspaper Clippings on Vietnam, January 1968

This document is a collage of newspaper clippings from the New York Time and the Washington Post on union leaders' positions on Vietnam. The boxed quotation is excerpted from a recent AFL-CIO convention.

Paul's Letter to American Christians

Dr. King shares "Paul's Letter to American Christians" with the congregation of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In this contemporary letter revised by Dr. King, Apostle Paul writes concerning the "responsibilities of Americans to live as Christians." He discusses his appreciation for America, the danger of capitalism, communism, segregation in churches, and the many denominations of Protestantism. But above all things, Apostle Paul believes that love is the most "durable power in the world."

Pueblo Poll: "King's Vietnam Opinion Lacks Majority Support"

This article contains opinions from various residents of Pueblo, CO, concerning Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

SCLC's Eighth Annual Convention Resolution

This SCLC Resolution for the 8th Annual Convention, outlines the plan to encourage churchmen across the country to vote in the light of religious faith and conviction.

Showdown for Nonviolence

Dr. King discusses the rationale and strategy for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. He explains that the SCLC hopes to avoid a national holocaust by promoting massive nonviolent demonstrations.

Statement to SCLC Board: Alabama Movement

Dr. King discusses the various issues within the State of Alabama. Dr. King and the SCLC have maintained leadership in the Alabama Movement and have proposed a plan to continue the acts of nonviolence.

The Church Says No on Proposition 14

Thie Council of Churches in Northern and Southern California argues against the goals of Proposition 14. This 1964 ballot proposition sought to amend the California consitution by nullifying the Rumford Fair Housing Act. Prop 14 would go on to pass, but two years later the California Supreme Court deemed it unconstitutional.

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