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Brooke, Edward William

Associated Archive Content : 17 results

Boston Sunday Herald: Martin King Discusses. . .

In Boston Sunday Herald article, Dr. King shares his views on mayoral candidate Mrs. Louise Day Hicks, Senator Edward Brooke, and the President's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King is adamant enough on the latter issue that he remarks he may change his policy regarding neutrality in elections.

Georgia Council on Human Relations: Program Highlights

This newsletter informs readers of the upheaval in the state of Georgia by reporting a variety of incidents around the state. The program focuses on events around Atlanta, including an attack in the Dixie Hills community in which two Molotov cocktails were thrown and, during the ensuing chaos, one man one was killed by a shotgun blast and three others wounded.

King's Way Hurts Rights Movement

Mr. White, author of this article, argues that the political fallout from Dr. King's stance on America's involvement in Vietnam hinders the goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from C. B. Kelley to MLK

C. B. Kelley shares his disagreement with Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Letter from Edmund W. Gordon to MLK

Edmund W. Gordon, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance at Yeshiva University, invites Dr. King to serve on the Dr. W.E.B. DuBois memorial committee. The committee proposes a memorial park to honor Dr. DuBois in his hometown of Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

Letter from Edward W. Brooke to MLK

In this letter, Senator Edward W. Brooke offers his gratitude to Dr. King, for his support of the current civil rights bill.

Letter from Henry Darby to Edward Brooke

Henry Darby, a student at Atlanta University asks for information about Dr. King's involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from John Brush to MLK

John W. Brush expresses his dissent with Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts for changing his stance on the Vietnam War. Brush also commends Dr. King on his oppositional stance.

Letter from Julius Avery to MLK Regarding Vietnam

In this letter Julius H. Avery writes MLK to urge him to reconsider his position on the Vietnam war. Avery expresses his support for world peace but stresses that Dr. King's remarks are volatile and do not warrant "opening the flood gates to Communism."

Letter from Richard Actis-Grande to MLK

Richard Actise-Grande notifies Dr. King of an enclosed advance copy of Look Magazine. Actise-Grande believes that articles by Eric Sevareid, a former CBS news reporter and war correspondent, and Senator Edward Brooke will be of special interest to Dr. King.

Letter from Richard U. Smith to MLK

Rev. Richard Smith expresses his political views on the possible re-election of Adam Clayton Powell. Smith explains to Dr. King and other leaders that to rally for Mr. Powell is to ignore the moral character of man.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

William Kivi warns Dr. King that Senator Edward Brooke is a danger to the progress made as a result of the civil rights movement. Sen. Brooke alleges that Dr. King caused major harm to the movement once he chose to speak out against the Vietnam War. In Kivi's view of Brooke and his policies, "He reasons like a true Republican-out to feather his own nest at the expense of the entire negro race-worldwide."

Lucky to Be an American

An anonymous person tells Dr. King that he has lost his place as the most liked American. The author infers that Dr. King should not look for everything free and work for his success.

S.C.L.C's Rev. Bevel Charges U.S. Gov't With Genocide

This article, details the work and beliefs of Reverend James L. Bevel, a Baptist minister and field representative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Bevel claims that the United States Government is committing genocide against Negro people.

Sen. Edward Brooke Press Release

Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts travels to Africa to discuss world affairs and the needs of the country with African leaders. Also, his itinerary for the trip is present.