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Highlander Folk School (Monteagle, TN)

Associated Archive Content : 15 results

A Look to the Future

Dr. King addresses the Highlander Folk School during the organization's twenty-fifth anniversary. He discusses the many accomplishments and hurdles of the Civil Rights Movement.

Adverse Postcard to MLK

American Opinion illustrates a propaganda postcard of Dr. King that accuses him of being a communist. The photo on the postcard was taken at the Highlander School in 1957 which trained leaders in nonviolent passive resistance.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

Postcard has a photo entitled "Training Schools for Communists". American Opinion claims the photo was taken at the Highlander Folk School over Labor Day weekend 1957. Dr. King is depicted as one the attendees. Postcard was stamped with an Abraham Lincoln postage stamp (One of the guiding forces to Dr. King and his efforts)

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.

Helping Across the South

Operation Freedom is an organization that originally began in west Tennessee to aid African Americans that were wrongly evicted from their homes due to the white power structure. The committees of Operation Freedom have expanded to other southern states where their help is needed.

Highlander Folk School 25th Anniversary Seminar

The Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, Tennessee, hosts the 25th Anniversary Seminar entitled "The South Thinking Ahead." At the program, Dr. King is scheduled to deliver the keynote address and activities have been set up to entertain the children that may be in attendance.

Letter from Charles Sherrod to Friends of SNCC

Field Secretary Charles Sherrod invites friends of the SNCC to an emergency meeting to outline the direction of the student and Civil Rights Movement. The meeting is to be held at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee which serves as a training ground for nonviolence and civil rights activities.

Letter from Kenneth M. Stewart to MLK

Mr. Stewart informs Dr. King that the local paper on Long Island recently ran an ad by the John Birch Society which featured a photograph of Dr. King at the Highlander Folk School. The photograph was used to associate Dr. King with communists. Stewart requests information about the photograph from Dr. King so that he can write a letter to the editor of the paper to protest the insinuation of "guilt by association."

Letter from Lawrence Caesar to Andrew Young

Lawrence A. Caesar writes Andrew Young with concerns about charges against Dr. King having appeared in a "Training School for Communists." He states that he simply wants information to refute these charges in order to prevent any negative impact against the movement.

Letter from MLK to Beatrice Rosselll

Dr. King takes an opportunity to express gratitude for Beatrice Rossell's support to the civil rights movement. He addresses her inquiry regarding his activities with the Highlander Folk School and possible Communist ties. Rossell received a picture of Dr. King at Highlander and the caption addressed him as a Communist.

Martin Luther King....At Communist Training School

This advertisement printed in the Augusta Courier accuses Dr. King and several constituents of communist involvement.

Memo from the American Lutheran Church to Denver Area Pastors

David Brown of the American Lutheran Church sends an article and copy of a letter from a pastor responding to the article to Denver area pastors. The article, published in "Common Sense," depicts Dr. King as a "Marxist tool" and agitator.

News from Highlander Folk School

Beginning on January 15th, the News from Highlander Folk school will open its adult educational program. In support of the program, many renowned leaders across Amercia signed the statement.

SCLC Annual Meeting

This program outlines the schedule of events for SCLC's 1961 annual meeting.

Statement by MLK on Perjury Charges

Dr. King addresses his indictment for perjury supposedly related to improperly filed Alabama state tax returns. He points out that the tax auditor who assured him that his returns were accurate is the person bringing the charges. He proposes a group of distinguished citizens to review his books and report their findings and concludes by stating that his conscience is clear.