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Discrimination in Public Accomodations

Associated Archive Content : 171 results

"Green Power" for Negroes

This SCLC news release documents the success of "a pioneer agreement between the Chicago Freedom Movement and a large grocery chain." As a product of Operation Breadbasket, this development cycled both jobs and capital to keep them organic to the Negro community.

1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award

This program details the events surrounding the Davenport Catholic Interracial Council's 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. Dr. King received the award that year for exemplifying principles of peace and freedom.

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

Dr. King describes the efforts of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference involvement in the civil rights campaign, May-July of 1964, in St. Augustine, Florida. The excerpted article is taken from the SCLC Newsletter.

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.

A First Step Toward School Integration

This article on the first steps toward school integration includes a foreword by Dr. King. The article goes into some detail about the events regarding the integration of schools in Nashville, Tennessee.

A New South A-Coming

This pamphlet discusses the courageous stand of African American high school students against racial discrimination in the South. The efforts demonstrated by these young people to bring about change of many undemocratic practices were significantly noted in Negro history.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Address by MLK to the National Press Club

During an address to the National Press Club in Washington, Dr. King declares the time for racial justice has arrived.

Address By Senator Edward M. Kennedy to the SCLC

Senator Edward M. Kennedy highlights Dr. King's efforts during the Civil Rights Movement. He also expresses concerns about poverty, unemployment, nonviolence, segregation and integrity.

Alabama SCLC July 1966 Report

Albert Turner of the Alabama SCLC delivers a report on upcoming and continuing programs of the local SCLC. Some of the programs include political action and a SCLC convention.

Albany Manifesto

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

American Education: Segregation, Northern Style

This article from American Education focuses on the problem of de facto segregation in Northern and Southern cities that results from discrimination in housing and contributes to further housing discrimination and minority unemployment. De facto segregation is as detrimental as legalized (de jure) segregation. The author provides an overview of efforts around the country to eliminate segregation in public schools and some of the difficulties encountered.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

An Analysis of the Ethical Demands of Integration

Dr. King argues that desegregation is only the first step towards the ultimate goal of complete racial equality. He explains that nonviolence, driven by the power of love, is crucial to create true integration.

Annual Address by MLK for the Montgomery Improvement Association

This document outlines Dr. King's address for the Fourth Anniversary of the Montgomery Improvement Association, held at Bethel Baptist Church in Montgomery. In the address, Dr. King speaks about the history, achievements and current task of the Association.

Annual Report by MLK

Dr. King illustrates in his annual report the innovative changes that have occurred within the country, as well as the world. He also expresses the Republican stand point on civil rights and the constant concern of racism.

Annual Report of The President: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

In the SCLC's Annual Presidential Report, Dr. King chronicles a decade of organization's activities to eliminate segregation. The report was delivered at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC.

Appeal to the President of the United States

This document, prepared for the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, serves as a plea to President Kennedy and a legal brief. The plea is to use the centennial as an opportunity to "rededicate" the nation to the principles embedded in the Emancipation Proclamation; to make an executive order to end all statutory segregation and discrimination in the states; and to exercise full leadership protecting civil rights, including the use of force, if nonviolent methods fail.

Article Regarding Harry Belafonte and Associates Denied Service

This article states, Harry Belafonte and associates were denied lunch service at the King's Inn Restaurant. Dr. King issued a statement that no action will be taken at the present time, due to the loss of several distinguished leaders in a recent air disaster.

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

Background Paper on the Student Sit-in Protest Movement

The Division of Racial Minorities and the Division of Christian Citizenship of the National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church give some background information on the "sit-in protest movement" and list three points in summary.

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Ralph David Avernathy

This biographical sketch of Dr. Abernathy outlines his positions, recognitions, education, travel experience and personal life. Dr. Abernathy served as President of the SCLC after Dr. King's death and also served as a member of the NAACP, and Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Birmingham Desegregation Settlement Agreement

Dr. King reviews the settlement made between the City of Birmingham and civil rights protesters. This agreement includes the integration of lunch counters, sitting rooms, restrooms, and water fountains within ninety days.

Birmingham Manifesto

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

Bold Design for a New South

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding

This document provides a detail description of Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding, a candidate for the Democratic primary in the 53rd assembly district.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Conference on Social Statistics Resolutions

This document lists a number of solutions for improving the acknowledgement of minorities in America. These solutions were drafted during the Conference on Social Statistics held in Washington D.C.

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