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Southern Christian Leadership Conference--Organizational Structure

Associated Archive Content : 164 results

Staff of SCLC

The SCLC lists its executive, field and clerical staff.

Stars for Freedom 1967

This magazine highlights celebrities who have contributed to the Civil Rights Movement as well as the contributions of SCLC and other programs across America. Featured in the article is statement by SCLC President, Dr. King.

Suggested SCLC Organizational Structure

This document outlines the preliminary organizational structure of SCLC with brief descriptions of roles and responsibilities.

Suggestions for S.C.L.C.

Dr. King drafts a list of suggestions for the SCLC and lists the contact information for several of the organizations members.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Dr. King and Wyatt Walker send an urgent request for Burke Marshall to investigate the bombing of SCLC Board Member C. O. Simpkins' home in Shreveport, Louisiana. The two SCLC officials inform Mr. Marshall that the suspects were released for lack of evidence despite other information to the contrary.

Telegram from Operation Breadbasket Leaders to Ivan Allen

This telegram originates from leaders of the Atlanta chapter of Operation Breadbasket and urges the Mayor to take action on employment opportunities for African-Americans.

Terminated Employee Asks for a Meeting with the SCLC Board

Meredith Gilbert writes to William Rutherford regarding her termination in January 1968 from employment with SCLC.

Terror in Louisiana

The article describes the terrorist actions occurring within the area of north Louisiana. An African American dentist by the name of C.O. Simpkins was one of the victims targeted due to his activism in Civil Rights. Due to Simpkins large presence within the movement, his house was bombed and burned down. This is just one example of the constant hatred and violence many African Americans had to go through to gain equality within the South.

The SCLC and Leadership of MLK

The various protest mechanisms and action organizations serves as a long lasting contribution to the Negro community initiated by the movement in the South. The church has served as a location for organization which progresses community participation. During slavery, the slaves were allowed to congregate only at weddings and funerals. Many of these events were fabricated in order to create a means of collective communication between the slaves. The author asserts that it was in this tradition that the SCLC was formed.

The Southern Struggle - What Can You Do?

Corretta Scott King discusses the privilege of being able to experience a great social revolution based on love and nonviolence, as inspired by the teachings of Jesus and Gandhi. She identifies Rosa Park's personal protest on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama as the beginning of the southern struggle and consequent revolution. She goes on to describe how this simple act aroused a great movement across the south, ultimately leading to the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in January of 1957.

The World's March Toward Human Rights

Dr. King addresses the issue of Equal Justice Under the Law at a convocation of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

This is SCLC

This SCLC brochure highlights the organization's mission, organizational structure, and initiatives, such as voter registration drives, Citizenship Schools, and the Leadership Training Program.

This is SCLC

This is a brochure describing the functions of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Subjects discussed in this brochure include the source of SCLC'S funds, community efforts, civil rights demonstrations, and information on its leadership training and citizenship schools.

Why Should SCLC be Departmentalized?

This document defines and discusses the departmentalization of the SCLC. It also outlines the job duties of the following positions: Executive Director, Program Director, Director of Affiliates, Field Secretary, Field Worker, and Subsistence Worker.

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