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Bunche, Ralph J. (Ralph Johnson)

b. 1903 - d. 1971

In 1950, Ralph Bunche became the first African American to win the Nobel Peace Prize. He received the prize for his role as a United Nations diplomat in negotiating a peace agreement that terminated the Arab-Israeli conflict of 1948. Bunche, who had earned a doctorate from Columbia University, chaired the political science department at Howard University for several years prior to his career as a diplomat. He followed his work as academic with work at the State Department, during which time he was critically involved in the administrative development of the United Nations. Throughout his distinguished career as academic, State Department official and diplomat, Bunche demonstrated a strong commitment to civil rights advocacy.

Associated Archive Content : 21 results

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Invitation from Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Bunche to Dr. and Mrs. MLK

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Bunche invite Dr. and Mrs. King to an informal dinner in the Kew Gardens neighborhood of Queens, New York.

King Finds New Target

This article from The Topeka Daily Capital discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King verbalizes his stance after seeing anti-poverty funds being used for war. The article also mentions civil rights leaders who are against joining both causes for civil rights and world peace.

Letter from M.W. Espy to MLK

This letter is requesting that Dr. King sign the First Day Cover of the twenty cent postage stamp honoring Gen. George C. Marshall. It is also noted that two other Nobel Peace Prize winners have signed the Cover as well.

Letter from Malcolm X to MLK

Malcolm X invites Dr. King, along with other Negro leaders, to give an analysis and a solution on the current "race problem" at a rally in New York on August 10th.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunch to Raphael Gould

Though Ralph J. Bunche agrees with the "Unique Value and Importance of Education for Peace", he is unsure to the effectiveness of the principle.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Ralph Bunche inquires if Dr. King and his wife will be available for lunch and dinner with himself and members of the United Nations before leaving for Oslo.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Ralph J. Bunche sends an invitation to Dr. King, asking him to join the International Sponsors Committee at the New School for Social Research in New York City. This committee was developed in honor of Norman Thomas, an advocate for human rights.

Letter from Stephen J. M. Robbins to MLK

Stephen Robbins thanks Dr. King for inviting the United States National Student Association to participate in the demonstrations in Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. Robbins states that the organization has directed its focus to equal opportunity for all and protection for demonstrators. Robbins also invites Dr. King to address the 18th National Student Congress at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

MLK Report: Annual Address, MIA

In his final address to the Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King gives a status report on the various initiatives of the organization. He also gives a final farewell in hopes that the MIA is challenged to continue to fight in the struggle for equality.

Schedule for Oslo Trip

This itinerary outlines Dr. King's schedule leading up to the Nobel Peace Prize Award Ceremony. The itinerary includes flight arrangements, speaking engagements, interviews, sight seeing, press conferences and tourist activities.

Schedule for Trip to Oslo, Norway

This document contains the schedule for Dr. King's trip to Oslo, Norway. During this trip, Dr. King is scheduled to receive the Nobel Peace Prize and meet with King Olav V of Norway.

SCLC Pamphlet of Articles in Rebuttal of MLK's Critics

Andrew Young, the National Executive Director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, issued this pamphlet entitled "Does Martin Luther King, Jr. Have the Right? The Qualifications? The Duty? To Speak Out on Peace?" The pamphlet features several editorials written in defense of Dr. King that were published in the New York Times, Detroit Free Press, New York Post, and the Nation in April 1967. The pamphlet includes a statement saying the SCLC's primary focus is civil rights but they support Dr. King's right to speak his opinion regarding the Vietnam War.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

The Dilemma of The Negro

Dr. King provides an outlook on the social and political plight of the contemporary Negro. He claims "The challenge is the fact that society expects, indeed demands, that the Negro be as productive, as resourceful, as skillful and as responsible as his white brother who is not handicapped by oppression". He urges Negro citizens to capitalize on current opportunities for advancement. "The negro must not wait until the dawn of absolute emancipation...".

The Lonesome Road

Stanley D. Levison sends Dr. King an article from The Washington Post titled "The Lonesome Road," which is a review of Dr. Kings book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Martin Duberman, the author of the article, explains Dr. King's reasons for writing the book, and Duberman also provides a favorable review of the publication.

UAW 25th Anniversary Dinner Program

The UAW's 25th Anniversary Dinner Program contains letters from notable activists commending the UAW, a statement from President Kennedy, a guest list, the evening's program, and a list of sponsors and donors. Guest speakers include: Dr. King, Senator Paul Douglas, Secretary of Labor Arthur Goldberg, and UAW President Walter Reuther.