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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Presidential Meetings

Associated Archive Content : 38 results

Address at a Conference of Religious Leaders Under the Sponsorship of the President's Committee on Government Contracts

Dr. King addresses a delegation of religious leaders at a conference hosted by the President's Committee on Government Contracts. In this pivotal speech, Dr. King outlines the responsibilites of clergymen and government officials in combating poverty and economic discrimination. He stresses the need for lay leaders and representatives of government to bodly speak out against the vestiges of discrimination that continuously hinder the economic and social progress of Negroes in America.

Face the Nation Interview

This is a transcript of an August 1965 interview of Dr. King on the CBS television news program Face the Nation. King is asked to comment on numerous issues facing American society including the conflict in Vietnam, civil rights, housing and birth control.

Invitation from President Kennedy to MLK

The President of the United States invites Dr. King to attend a luncheon at the White House.

Invitation to John F. Kennedy Funeral

This telegram sent from The White House in Washington, invites Dr. King to participate in the funeral services for President John F. Kennedy.

Invitation to President Johnson's Inauguration

Dr. King receives an invitation to attend and participate in the Inauguration of President Lyndon B. Johnson and Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey.

Leaders' Itinerary for August 28 March

This document contains a detailed leaders' itinerary for the March on Washington for Freedom and Jobs. Throughout the day leaders will meet with government officials, including, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives John McCormack and President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

A. Phillip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, writes to Dr. King enclosing a letter to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Mr. Randolph addresses concerns of nationwide rioting in retaliation to social and economic oppression.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK about an Invitation

In this letter, Mr. Hubert Humphrey, Vice President of the United States, writes to Dr. King declining his invitation to address the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Regarding Wiley Branton

In this letter the office of the Vice President informs Dr. King of the new role of Wiley Branton to serve as Executive Secretary of the President's Council on Equal Opportunity.

Letter from Jay Richard Kennedy to MLK

Jay Kennedy encloses a copy of a picture and a transcript from a television program that included Dr. King. He thanks Dr. King for an earlier letter and explains that their views are aligned. Kennedy also briefly discusses civil rights in America and the federal government.

Letter from Letitia Baldrige to MLK

Letitia Baldridge, Social Secretary for the White House, informs Dr. and Mrs. King of changes related to a reception with President Kennedy.

Letter from MLK to Richard Nixon

Dr. King follows up a conversation he had with the Vice President Richard Nixon while in Ghana. He expresses interest in meeting with him to discuss problems in the South.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Vice President Richard M. Nixon expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's participation at the recent Religious Leaders Conference on Equal Job Opportunity. Nixon emphasizes the need for ongoing collaboration between local and national leaders to advance critical policy initiatives.

Letter from Ruth Frank Rosenwald to MLK

Ruth Frank Rosenwald writes urging Dr. King to commend Robert Kennedy for his advocacy of peaceful alternatives to war and to invite him to issue a joint call for a meeting of civil rights and peace leaders and President Johnson for dialogue on U.S policy in Vietnam, Santo Domingo and West Germany.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Lyndon B. Johnson invites Dr. King to a conference to hear a progress report on the work of the President's Committee for Equal Employment.

Letter From Vice President Johnson to MLK

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson wrote this note to Dr. King to respectfully decline his invitation to a luncheon and to serve on the board of directors of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He states he enjoyed their last meeting and is looking forward to the next one.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to express his regrets that Dr. King could not attend the White House's Community Leaders Conference. Johnson continues that he and the Equal Employment Opportunity Committee were thrilled with the support Dr. King provided to the conference despite his absence.

Letter to MLK Regarding Merit Award

The author writes a letter that advocates for Dr. King to win an award of merit. In the letter, he discusses some major events that occurred throughout the Reverend's life. Some of these events include: leading the Civil Rights Movement, winning the Nobel Peace Prize, and becoming a strong political figure.

Memorandum from Jacob Seidenberg to Participants

Jacob Seidenberg, the Executive Director of the President's Committee on Government Contracts, provides details on the agenda to the participants in the Religious Leaders Conference. Dr. King was one of those participants.

MLK's Remarks on Conference with the President

Dr. King provides the perspective he shared at a meeting held by the President with leaders from the white and Negro community discussing civil rights. His speech includes several steps to reach equality across the US.

New Left Versus Old Liberals in Battle for Dr. King's Soul

Conservative syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak claim that Dr. King's soul is being challenged by various factions with whom he has associated. Evans and Novak question Dr. King's relationship with Stokely Carmichael by reminding him of his promise never to work with Mr. Carmichael again.

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Presidential Invitation to White House Luncheon

President Kennedy invites Dr. King to attend a White House Luncheon on the occasion of the visit of Archbishop Makarios, the President of the Republic of Cyprus.

Reception Honoring Ambassadors of the Organization of African Unity

In 1966, while President Lyndon B. Johnson was in office, Dr. King received this invitation to a reception at the White House. The reception honored Ambassadors of the Organization of African Unity States.

Telegram from Charles Pincjard to MLK

Charles Pincjard writes Dr. King to confirm the date for a the WMPP Awards Brunch.

Telegram from Civil Rights Leaders to President Kennedy

Members of the SCLC and prominent civil rights leaders request an immediate conference with President John F. Kennedy regarding the 1963 Birmingham church bombing.

Telegram from James S. Symington to MLK

James S. Symington of the U.S. Department of State invites Dr. King to meet with Prime Minister Forbes Burham of Guyana. Symington provides Dr. King with the Prime Minister's itinerary for California and Texas.

Telegram from Kenneth O'Donnell of the White House to MLK

Kenneth O'Donnell sends this telegram to Dr. King encouraging the Reverend to attend a meeting with the President of the United States and several other Civil Rights leaders.

Telegram from Lawrence F. O'Brien to MLK

Lawrence O'Brien, Special Assistant to President Johnson, invites Dr. King to the signing of the Voting Rights Act in Washington, D.C.

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