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Police - Complaints Against

Associated Archive Content : 154 results

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Letter from Bill Kunstler to MLK

Famed civil rights attorney William Kunstler states that this was the first time a federal court enjoined prosecution of contempt cases under a state injunction. He would like to use the same procedures in Mississippi.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

In reply to Dr. King's telegram concerning the actions of a Mitchell County peace officer towards Mrs. Slater King, the wife of a civil rights activist and successful real estate broker, Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall writes that an investigation of this matter has been ordered.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Dept. of Justice, responds to Dr. King's telegram requesting a Federal investigation concerning an incident involving Mr. Toomes Clendon and Sheriff W. E. Hammond. In closing, Marshall assures the Reverend that appropriate action will be taken should a violation be involved.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a recent telegram concerning an investigation in the alleged assault upon Miss Shirley Gaines by an Albany police officer.

Letter from Charles R. Bell Jr. to MLK

Mr. Bell inquires about a prisoner who was beaten to death in his home state of Alabama.

Letter from David Puckett to MLK

David Puckett writes Dr. King on behalf of the poor whites in the Uptown area of Chicago. Puckett asks Dr. King to support the upcoming rally and march, where they will demand the release of Sam Joseph O'Donnell and protest against the police.

Letter from E.E. Adams to MLK

E. E. Adams relates his thoughts about the constitutionality of urban renewal.

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.

Letter from Fannie Lou Hamer to Friends

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer requests the help of 'Friends', pertaining to voting rights in Mississippi. Mrs. Hamer also details some of the sufferings of black folks in Mississippi, especially, as it pertains to potential repercussions for them registering to vote.

Letter from Howard Schomer to Robert Kennedy

Howard Schomer asks the US Attorney General several questions about the legality of a police raid that occurred at a Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) office in New Orleans, Louisiana. Schomer wants to know if the statute under which the raid was carried out has legal force and does the Department of Justice have an obligation to make its evidence public?

Letter from Hubert Williams to MLK

A member of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the increased tension between Negros and New York police.

Letter from Jameas Lucas to MLK Regarding Legal Help

Mr. Lucas requests Dr. King's legal assistance regarding a manslaughter trial against a white man.

Letter from Mae Martin to MLK

Mae Martin of Little Rock, Arkansas, writes to Dr. King in response to one of his public statements. She speaks about race relations in her city and points out that there is good and bad within both the white and black communities.

Letter from Mildred Hood to MLK

Mildred Hood explains to Dr. King what she and her daughter experienced at the Cook County Hospital in Chicago. Hood wants to know what she can do about the situation.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy requesting an investigation in Williamston, NC to relieve the Negro community from violence and "unconstitutional police action."

Letter from MLK to H. A. Cruse

Dr. King extends support to H. A. Cruse, an individual whose constitutional rights were violated. Dr. King emphasizes that it is not just Negroes who have been "subjected to victimization resulting from failure of Southern law enforcement authorities to follow constitutional practices."

Letter from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King urges Attorney General Kennedy to act on behalf of the Negro citizens in LeFlore County who are being attacked for working in voter registration or becoming registered voters.

Letter from Mrs. Raymond Gautier and Mrs. Robert Joyner to MLK

The President and Secretary of a Seattle benefit guild, an organization consisting of twelve Negro women who seek to "promote unity for the improvement of the community," request a meeting with Dr. King. The benefit guild hopes to sponsor a rally to raise funds for the SCLC. Furthermore they describe the Northwest as a silent "nice nasty."

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding a case of civil disobedience in Albany, Georgia. He discusses the boycotting of Carl Smith's supermarket due to Smith serving as a juror in the civil action case of Ware vs. Johnson.

Letter from Robert L. Hartley to MLK

In this letter, SCLC member Robert Hartley asks Dr. King for assistance in getting released from jail.

Letter from the Faculty of the Tuskegee Institute to President Kennedy

Members of the faculty and staff of Tuskegee Institute issue a plea to President John F. Kennedy to intervene in the Birmingham crisis of 1963. They request that the President use an upcoming speech to discuss Constitutional rights, send the FBI to Alabama to investigate "charges of police brutality," and revoke federal funds that support segregation and persuade business leaders to desegregate public facilities.

Letter from the KKK Kids to MLK

An anonymous member of The K.K.K. Kids writes Dr. King expressing that he or she believes Dr. King to be "a very ignorant person."

Letter from United States Congress to MLK

Joseph McDade writes Dr. King to solicit his views regarding the affects of organized crime on the plight of the urban poor. test_1_4_2:58pm

Letter from Verinal Harris to MLK

Mrs. Verinal Harris pleads for the help of Dr. King regarding the brutal actions of the police against children in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Letter from Woodrow T. Hughes to MLK

This letter from Woodrow Hughes and Norman Seay of the Kinloch Gateway Center invites Dr. King to speak at their Second Annual City Wide Workshop. The letter refers to an enclosure with basic information about the city of Kinloch, Missouri. Kinloch is one of the largest all-black cities in the United States

Letter Requesting Help From MLK

An unidentified North Carolina man writes Dr. King requesting urgent assistance involving his brutal arrest by a state trooper. According to the man, the trooper physically assaulted him during detainment and ended up breaking two ribs. However, his other peers, mainly Negro, are too afraid to speak up about this police brutality case.

Letters from Irvine I. Turner to MLK

Irvine I. Turner requests, in three different letters, Dr. King provide an endorsement for reelection to the Newark Municipal Council.

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