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Daves, Joan

b. 1919 - d. 1997

Joan Daves, born Liselotte Davidson in Berlin, Germany, was literary agent for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. She emigrated from Germany as the Nazis were coming to power in the mid-1930s, initially taking refuge in Paris and Britain before finally settling in the U.S. in 1940. She became an editor at Harpers & Brothers and later co-founded the Marie Rodell and Joan Daves literary agency, and then the Joan Daves Agency. Daves worked with King on his first book, Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story, and remained his literary agent for his next three books, Strength to Love, Why We Can’t Wait and Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? In 1964, she accompanied Dr. King to Norway for his acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Daves worked with King’s literary property until her death.

Associated Archive Content : 237 results

Advice for Living

Dr. King addresses questions in the "Advice for Living" column published in Ebony Magazine on February 12, 1958.

Book payment to MLK

This cable from Dr. King's agent accompanied a royalty payment for the Japanese language edition of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Carbon Copy Letter from Dr. King to Joan Daves Regarding rights of "Strength To Love"

In this letter, Dr. King acknowledges that he is in receipt of Joan Daves letter about the schedule on June 8, as well as, the letter concerning the offer for the Japanese rights of "Strength To Love".

Carbon Copy of Letter from Melvin Arnold to Joan Daves

In this letter, Melvin Arnold, a representative of Harper & Row Publishing, clarifies and corrects sales and advertising figures related to Dr. King's book, "Strength of Love". The letter refers to a telephone conversation between Arnold and Joan Daves, a literary representative of Dr. King, in which advertising and promotion figures were discussed. Arnold uses the letter to justify the disappointing 18% sales outlay decided on by Dr. King's publisher.

Correspondence from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves writes Dr. King and attaches a letter from Pierre Servais, a publisher who plans to translate King's book "Strength to Love" to French. Servais also inquires if Dr. King can visit Paris or Brussels while he is in Europe, as his appearance would create an excellent opportunity to launch the sale of his book.

Correspondence: Letter from Joan Daves to MLK- October 14, 1963

Here Mr. Daves advises Dr. King to accept an offer presented to him for the Dutch rights of his novel "Strength to Love" then references two copies of the proposed contractual agreement.

Debit Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

This is a debit memo for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Joan Daves Informs MLK of a Proposal to Print the Speech from the March on Washington

Joan Daves negotiates with John Avirgan on the royalty percentage for the rights to sale hand-lettered versions of the Speech from the March on Washington.

Letter from Agenzia Letteraria Internazionale to Joan Daves

Agenzia Letteraria Internazionale informs Joan Daves of an international meeting on the problems of New Africa in Palermo, Italy. It is noted that Santi Ando & Figli would like for Dr. King to lecture in Rome, Milan, Florence, Torino & Bolgna and provide photographs they may use in their promotion campaign for Dr. King's books.

Letter from Bengt Bjerke to Dora McDonald

Bengt Bjerke from the Legal Counsel of the Nobel Foundation informs Dora McDonald that a signature is needed for Dr. King's copyright assignment form for his Nobel Lecture.

Letter from Cass Canfield to Joan Daves

Cass Canfield from Harper & Row, Publishers thanks Joan Daves for sending the outline of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here." Cass suggests that in the book Dr. King "should stress that the Negro problem is part of the poverty problem."

Letter from Chris Folcker to Joan Daves Regarding MLK Recording

In this letter, Chris Folcker informs Joan Daves of the limitations of the grammophone record with Dr. King and Harry Belafonte produced in Stockholm.

Letter from Constance Webb to MLK and Joan Daves

In this letter, Constance Webb asks Dr. King to share more details about the comments Richard Wright made about "perhaps there was more behind the incident then simply a "mad" woman.", referring to the lady who stabbed Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to F.A. Guilford

Dora McDonald expresses Dr. King's delight in knowing that F.A. Guilford of Oxford University Press wants to reprint the "Letter from Birmingham Jail." However, she informs Guilford that, due to the letter already being published, it is impossible for a reprint. McDonald refers Guilford to contact Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, for more information.

Letter from Dora to Joan

In this letter, Dora McDonald sends a photograph to Joan Daves.

Letter from Dorothy Hunt to MLK Regarding "The Critic"

Dorothy Hunt of The Thomas More Association begins this letter by thanking Dr. King for his prompt reply to their request about contributing to "The Critic." She then asks Dr. King if he would be able to do a piece for "The Critic," and if they could purchase the first American newspaper and magazine rights to a chapter from his book. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Dorothy L. Shereff to MLK Regarding a Book on Gandhi

Dorothy Shereff, Rights and Permissions Manager for The New American Library, requests that Dr. King send a statement to promote Professor Louis Fischer's book on Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Edouard Theis to MLK

Mr. Theis makes reference of having spoke to a French group of non-violent Christians about Dr. King's struggle for freedom. Mr. Theis suggests a reproduction of "Letter From The Birmingham Jail" as well as the distribution of the French translation as a chapter in a French Nonviolent Action book.

Letter from Gene Young to Joan Daves

Gene Young of Harper and Row Publishing sends this letter to Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent. He explains that he is waiting to send out promotional copies of Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here," until after he receives a list of who Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference have already sent copies. He attaches a list of those sent copies of Dr. King's last book so that they might use it as a checklist, including President Johnson, Vice President Humphrey, Robert F. Kennedy, and Dr.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves Regarding MLK Manuscript

In this letter, Genevieve Young informs Joan Daves of the notes created for the manuscript of Dr. King's book and questions about the sources of some of Dr. King's facts.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves Regarding MLK's Book Draft

Genevieve Young, from Harper & Row Publishers, expresses concern regarding an outline for Dr. King's upcoming book. She suggests an alternative way to frame the outline, and advises Joan Daves to use her discretion as to whether or not the memorandum should be passed on to Dr. King.

Letter from Gitta Gossman to MLK

The document references earnings from Dr. King's books "Strength to Love" and "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Harper & Row Publishers to Joan Daves

Harper & Row, Publishers representative Cass Canfield provides feedback about Dr. King's manuscript for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" to Joan Daves, Dr. King's agent. Canfield suggests replacing the last chapter of of the draft with a briefer and less expansive final section.

Letter from Harper & Row to Joan Daves regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Harper & Row informs Joan Daves about the receipt of the quote on Dr. King from Harry Golden, Editor of the Carolina Israelite.

Letter from Indian Agency to Harper & Row

In this letter, the writer requests permission to translate Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" into Marahati, one of the regional languages in India. The author mentions that some of the social problems in India are similar problems "the Negro" faced in the United States.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

In this letter, is enclosed a check from Alfred A. Knopf Inc. for the use of "What Next? Five Negro Leaders Reply" in the book "Minorities In A Changing World by Milton L. Baron.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

In this document, Dr. King receives a royalty check from J. Campe for the use of A Stone of Hope in a work entitled "This Nation." The amount of the check is 13.50.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK about Selections from "Strength to Love"

In this letter, Campe encloses payment for the rights of an English-language textbook to reprint five selections from Dr. King's "Strength to Love".

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "A Stride to Freedom"

In this letter, J. Campe encloses the German royalties, received from J.G. Onken, for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" German language edition.

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