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Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David)

b. 1890 - d. 1969

Dwight David Eisenhower, 34th U.S. president (1953-1961), was born in Denison, Texas. A five-star general in the U.S. Army, he served as Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe during World War II. He became president of Columbia University, taking an 18-month leave to serve as first commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). As Republican candidate for president, Eisenhower won a landslide victory in 1952 with vice presidential running mate Richard Nixon. Unenthusiastic about the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling on segregated schools and about legislating racial equality, Eisenhower nevertheless federalized the Arkansas National Guard to enforce school desegregation in Little Rock in 1957 and signed civil rights bills in 1957 and 1960.

Associated Archive Content : 34 results

"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

1967 Geneva Convocation

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

A Lack of Jewish Soldiers

T.S. D'Amico writes Dr. King and others over what he perceives as a lack of Jewish men being drafted into military service.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Eisenhower (His Nationalism)

Dr. King writes a few notes on President Eisenhower's speech made at Lafayette College in 1946. President Eisenhower states that because the United States is the greatest force in the world, it should extend its influence to protect itself.

Eisenhower - Views on the Racial Question

Dr. King notes General Dwight D. Eisenhower's justification of racial segregation during Eisenhower's 1948 testimony before a Senate subcommittee.

Excerpts from Remarks of The Vice President

Vice President Richard M. Nixon speaks about the Eisenhower Administration’s support of Negroes in the fight to remove discrimination in employment.

Findings and Recommendation Committee

This is a recommendation to establish a temporary coordinating committee in Atlanta, GA to deal particularly in the areas of finance and communication.

Invitation from Henry Ford II

This letter from Henry Ford II is an invitation to a charitable dinner honoring General Eisenhower for receiving the Family of Man Award. The proceeds from the dinner will fund the programs of the Council which will aid families and youth.

Invitation to Dinner for General Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dr. King received this formal invitation to attend and be seated on the dais at The Family of Man Award Dinner in honor of General Dwight D. Eisenhower, at the Hotel Astor on 10/28/64.

Letter from Anton Marguleas to MLK

Anton Marguleas, of the Paramount Export Company, writes Dr. King to express his views on democracy and human rights.

Letter from Edwin Hoffman to MLK

West Virginia State College invites Dr. King to address the American Affairs Forum and provides him with select dates to choose from. The college has extended an appreciation for various prime ministers, presidents, attorney generals, and other political figures for their support. Dr. King is congratulated from the college from the receipt of the Nobel Piece Prize.

Letter from Florida Writer to President Lyndon Johnson on True Equality

This letter from a Florida resident to President Johnson expresses the writer's views on the nation's racial challenges.

Letter From Harry A. Ploski to MLK

Harry A. Ploski writes Dr. King concerning a book he and Professor Roscoe Brown have written. Hoping to solicit endorsement, he encloses a copy of the table of contents and an outline of the topics addressed.

Letter from John Huston to MLK

Reverend John Huston of the East View United Church of Christ writes to Dr. King to express his appreciation for Operation Breadbasket. Huston calls this the most effective civil rights initiative he's ever had the pleasure of working on. He brings up three points that he would like to discuss with Dr. King, including how to better advocate for the Negroes' federally guaranteed rights.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.

Letter from Milton S. Eisenhower to MLK

This letter from former President Eisenhower's brother Milton, on behalf of Planned Parenthood World Population, requests that Dr. King serve the organization in order to "lend important moral support."

Letter from MLK and Others to President Dwight D. Eisenhower

A group of Southern religious leaders write to President Eisenhower concerning the extreme violence directed towards Negro people throughout the South. They request his immediate action to address the nation's moral and legal framework sustained by the presiding racial climate.

Letter to MLK from Carolina Smith

The author negatively expresses ideas to Dr. King, in his actions towards the Vietnam War.

MLK Address at the AFL-CIO Fourth Constitutional Convention

Dr. King delivers a speech at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO to address the lack of equality and rights for laborers and people of color. Dr. King encourages those at the convention to remain steadfast in the fight for social justice in order to overcome the mountain of oppression.

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

MLK's Remarks on Conference with the President

Dr. King provides the perspective he shared at a meeting held by the President with leaders from the white and Negro community discussing civil rights. His speech includes several steps to reach equality across the US.

President's Committee on Government Contracts

In 1953 President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the President's Committee on Government Contracts. This organization was created to ensure anti-discrimination compliance with any organizations affiliated with government contracts. This report highlights "Five Years of Progress" within the organization.

SCEF Policy Statement

This is a policy statement on current civil rights and civil liberties issues presented by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. The organization is an educational agency with the purpose of eradicating discrimination among the nation's citizens. This document contains a list of advocacies and condemnations as it relates to federal legislature in favor of civil rights support.

Sermon on Conformity Thought "Nonconformist - J. Bond"

Dr. King in this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church speaks to his congregation on the topic of disent. He expresses in detail about how we essentially must not conform to standards set by society.

Southern Leaders Conference letter to Eisenhower

Ministers meeting at the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration co-signed this letter to Pres. Eisenhower.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

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