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Evers, Medgar Wiley

b. 1925 - d. 1963

Medgar Evers was the first National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) field secretary in his native Mississippi. He held that position from 1954 until his assassination in 1963. As NAACP field secretary, Evers worked on the 1955 Emmett Till lynching case and was a resource to James Meredith, when he successfully challenged the segregation policy of the University of Mississippi. Evers also maintained contact with Dr. King, briefly joining the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957. When he was assassinated Evers was working on a campaign to protest the refusal of Jackson’s Mayor Alan Thompson to appoint a biracial committee to address racial problems. A veteran of World War II, Evers was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Later that year, he was posthumously awarded the NAACP’s highest honor, the Spingarn Medal. In 1994, Byron de la Beckwith was convicted of Medgar Evers’ murder.

Associated Archive Content : 21 results

"Harlem Wants To Know"

In this document, residents of Harlem question the trial in the murder of Malcom X.

African American Unity in Atlanta, Georgia

The author of this document discusses why it is imperative for African Americans to not only stand in unity against the injustices of society, but to also be informed about the issues in which they strive to prevail against. Information about school integration, housing discrimination, and taxation is offered in the conclusion of the document.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Eulogy for Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Victims

This is Dr. King?s eulogy for three of the four young girls killed in the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. God gives man the right to exercise good and evil, King says, but God wills that everything will happen for the good ? that out of tragedy comes redemption. Martyred in the struggle for freedom, the girls have become symbols of the crusade and of the faith that sustains it. King speaks of forgiving those who murdered the girls and the need to transform the system, the way of life, and the philosophy that led to the bombing.

Fiercely Upward and Other Newspaper Articles

This document contains a combination of two poems by a principle in Brooklyn, N.Y., and two articles highlighting significant upcoming events of 1963 and 1964. The first article announces the third printing of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" as well as information regarding the release of his forthcoming work "Why We Can't Wait." The second article reports on Mrs. Medgar W. Evers' speaking tour slated to take place in the fall of 1963, just a few months after her husband, the NAACP leader, was slain.

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Bolt Culbertson

Dora McDonald informs Culbertson that Dr. King is grateful for the invitation to speak at a South Carolina fundraiser for the families of Medgar Evers and the children killed in the Birmingham church bombing, but will be unable to attend. Miss McDonald refers Culbertson to contact Roy Wilkins of the NAACP to be a possible keynote speaker.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Lincoln Memorial Program

This is the Lincoln Memorial program for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Notable leaders including Dr. King, Walter Reuther, and Whitney M. Young, Jr., will make remarks at the march. Also included is a list of demands, a joint statement from ten organizations and a map.

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

People In Action: March on Washington

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

People to People: Civil Rights and Negative Normalcy

Dr. King attempts to answer questions from white liberals concerning the progress and importance of the Civil Rights Movement.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Primer For Delegates to the Democratic National Convention

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party informs citizens of the mistreatment incurred by African Americans attempting to register to vote and participate in election process. The Party also outlines its journey to sending 64 delegates to the Democratic Convention of 1964 and how President Johnson denied them seats at the Convention.

Proposed Nobel Speech

This is a draft for an optional version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. He notes the importance of viewing the world as a family and with such perception, understands race issues as an international concern. King also speaks of Sir Alfred Bernhard Nobel, the originator of the Nobel Peace Prize. He accepts the award on behalf of those who came before him and those who continue to fight for freedom.

Remarks by MLK at the Freedom House Annual Dinner

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for being honored by Freedom House. He also pays tribute to the life and work of John F. Kennedy while encourging others to honor his memory through their dedication to civil rights.

Statement Before The Credentials Committee

Dr. King makes a statement to the Democratic National Committee in an effort to persuade the the organization to recognize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party as a sitting, and voting, entity of the Democratic Party. Dr. King emphasizes that not only is the fabric of the Democratic National Party at stake, but representative government as it is known throughout the world.

Telegram from Author William Peters to Coretta Scott King Regarding a Book Opportunity

Peters was contracted to co-author the Myrlie Evers book by Random House. Random House then suggested he do the same with Coretta Scott King.

Telegram from MLK to President Lyndon B. Johnson

Dr. King urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to conduct a full investigation concerning the government's involvement with Medgar Evers' suspected murderer.

Telegram to MLK from Medgar Evers

Mississippi Civil Rights leader Medgar Evers sends a telegram to confirm his presence at the upcoming SCLC meeting in Clarksdale on May 29, 1958.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.