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Heschel, Abraham Joshua

b. 1907 - d. 1972

Abraham Joshua Heschel, Jewish theologian/philosopher, was born in Warsaw, studied at the University of Berlin and was ordained at the Institute for Jewish Studies in Berlin. Rabbi Heschel was arrested in 1939 by the Gestapo. He came to New York in 1940 and accepted teaching posts at Hebrew Union College and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. Heschel and Dr. King first met in Chicago at the 1963 National Conference on Race and Religion. Heschel marched arm in arm with King from Selma to Montgomery and accompanied King to the Riverside Church pulpit for his address opposing the Vietnam War. Author of The Prophets, Heschel said at a Rabbinical Assembly ten days before King’s death: “Where in America do we hear a voice like the voice of the prophets of Israel? Martin Luther King, Jr. is a voice, a vision and a way. The whole future of America will depend on the impact and influence of Dr. King.”

Associated Archive Content : 16 results

Beyond Vietnam

In Dr. Kings Beyond Vietnam address, he discusses seven major reasons for bringing Vietnam into "a field of moral vision," five things that the government should do to remove itself from conflict with Vietnam, the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam, and Premier Diem. Dr. King also encourages those in the churches and the synagogues to speak out against the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Alan J. Rankin to Miss Dora McDonald

Dr. King informs Alan J. Rankin to communicate to Dora McDonald about his availability to speak at the University Christian Council of McMaster University. The theme of the discussion for the "Teach-In" is going to be "The Religious Dilemma of Twentieth Century Man." Mr. Rankin expects over 2,000 students in attendance and church people from Canada. Furthermore, Mr. Rankin asserts that there will be news coverage on this event.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Letter from Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam

The Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam requests financial support for their mission of ending the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Abram Heschel

Harry Wachtel, legal counsel to Dr. King, expresses his gratitude to leading Jewish theologian Rabbi Heschel for his great works.

Letter from James C. Soutar to MLK

James C. Soutar expresses gratitude for Dr. King's work and requests an autographed photograph to frame along with notable teachers like Paul Tillich, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Abraham Heschel. All of these teachers were heavy influencers of Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Ralph McGill

Dr. King writes to Ralph McGill of the Atlanta Constitution to clarify his position on the Vietnam War. Dr. King considers his objection to the war to be a matter of conscience, and not one of political expediency.

Letter to Dora McDonald Regarding Persons Receiving Autographed Books

Dora McDonald receives a list of names who are to receive autographed copies of Dr. King's book. The list consists of contributors to American Foundation on Nonviolence and SCLC.

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

Negotiation Now!

Negotiation Now is a national citizens' campaign that supports new initiatives to end the Vietnam War. The campaign aligns with the Secretary General of the United Nations, U Thant, who discusses the necessary "cessation" of bombing in North Vietnam to bring about a peaceful political compromise. This flier shares the campaign's views and offers a section for donation information.

Official Religious Representatives Attending MLK Funeral

This document contains a list of official religious representatives who will attend Dr. King's funeral.

Rabbi Heschel on the War on Vietnam

Rabbi Abraham Heschel, civil rights advocate and associate of Dr. King, writes on the ethical corruption created by the Vietnam War. Calling the war an example of "extreme absurdity" that has been "nurtured on stereotypes," Rabbi Heschel encourages American citizens to recognize the demoralization of the war and take action against it.

Telegram from Abraham Heschel to MLK

Abraham Heschel tells Dr. King that he has a deep identification with the goals that Dr. King is dedicated to and offers him encouragement.

Telegram from MLK to Rabbi Abraham Heschel

Dr. King writes Rabbi Heschel indicating that he will happily serve as a sponsor of the nationwide campaign to end bombings in Vietnam.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

"Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam" is a sermon Dr. King delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967 in Atlanta. In this draft of the sermon, Dr. King references a previous speech, "Beyond Vietnam," that he delivered to the group "Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam" at Riverside Baptist Church in New York City.