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Hitler, Adolf

Associated Archive Content : 41 results

Reader Strikes Parallel Between America, Nazis

This document contains two letters to the editor of an unknown newspaper. The first letter is written by Edwin Johnson. He criticizes the war in Vietnam, making comparisons between the Nazis and the American military. E.D., the author of the second letter, also criticizes the war, calling for an end to the violence in Vietnam.

SCLC Pamphlet of Articles in Rebuttal of MLK's Critics

Andrew Young, the National Executive Director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, issued this pamphlet entitled "Does Martin Luther King, Jr. Have the Right? The Qualifications? The Duty? To Speak Out on Peace?" The pamphlet features several editorials written in defense of Dr. King that were published in the New York Times, Detroit Free Press, New York Post, and the Nation in April 1967. The pamphlet includes a statement saying the SCLC's primary focus is civil rights but they support Dr. King's right to speak his opinion regarding the Vietnam War.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Speech to the Freedom Riders

King delivered this speech, in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1961, at a rally to support the Freedom Riders. King encourages them to maintain postures and attitudes of non-violence in the face of violent responses to their actions and resistance. He assures them that while they will experience a "season of suffering," the moral rightness of their cause will prevail.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Testament by Martin A. Watkins

Martin Watkins covers an array of topics in his expression of poems entitled "Testament." With great admiration, Watkins presents this book of poetry to Dr. King. In the preface, Watkins explains his purpose of publishing these poems during the Korean War. He further elaborates on his admiration of the Negro, his preoccupation with death, and the identification with Christ.

The Casualties of The War In Vietnam

Dr. King speaks on behalf of the United States presence in Vietnam at a symposium held in Los Angeles, California. He addresses the moral, social, and political causalities that arise as result of war. Moreover, he urges the powers that be to allocate resources for good and rather than evil.

The Citizenship Education Program

This newsletter serves as a platform for the Citizenship Education Program. The program is designed to help inform African Americans of their rights as citizens in the United States.

Totalitarianism

Dr. King quotes a modern historian on their ideas of totalitarianism.

Transcript of MLK Appearance on WINS Radio

This document is a 1964 transcript of a WINS Radio interview with Dr. King. The focus is the Civil Rights Bill.

Unwise and Untimely?

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

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