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Humphrey, Hubert H. (Hubert Horatio)

Associated Archive Content : 37 results

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Daniel B. Brewster Address before the Senate

The Honorable Daniel B. Brewster, U. S. Senator from Maryland, addresses the President of the United States and the Second Session of the 88th Congress regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Let My People Vote

Dr. King addresses the problem of voting that Negroes in America are encountering and also talks about SCOPE's upcoming initiatives.

Let My People Vote

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Letter from Alden Bryant to MLK

Alden Bryant outlines a plan to assist with voter registration in the South by increasing the number of registrars. Bryant details how the process took place in Berkeley, California as an example. He requests a response from Dr. King to the plan.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to Dr. King regarding the 1968 election. He argues against Dr. King's picks for the best potential Republican and Democrat presidential candidates, saying that Vice President Humphrey would have a good chance at the White House if he were to publicly break with President Johnson over the Vietnam War.

Letter from Gene Young to Joan Daves

Gene Young of Harper and Row Publishing sends this letter to Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent. He explains that he is waiting to send out promotional copies of Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here," until after he receives a list of who Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference have already sent copies. He attaches a list of those sent copies of Dr. King's last book so that they might use it as a checklist, including President Johnson, Vice President Humphrey, Robert F. Kennedy, and Dr.

Letter from Harry Daniels to MLK

Harry Daniels stresses the urgency of an American withdrawal from Asia and proposes appointing Dr. King as special ambassador to North Vietnam.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK Regarding an Invitation

In this letter Senator Hubert Humphrey urges Dr. King to accept an invitation to speak at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to Mr. Alan F. Westin

Vice President Hubert Humphrey congratulates Professor Alan Westin for the creation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Vice President Humphrey thanks Dr. King for participating in a recent White House Conference, "To Fulfill These Rights," which focused on jobs, jobs training and economic security.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey informs Dr. King of scheduling complications that will delay his response to Dr. King's request to address the SCLC.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

In this letter, Vice President Humphrey extends a holiday greeting to Dr. King and his associates.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey commends Dr. King on the work of the Urban Coalition. He also informs Dr. King of his intent to work together to meet common goals.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK about an Invitation

In this letter, Mr. Hubert Humphrey, Vice President of the United States, writes to Dr. King declining his invitation to address the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Regarding Wiley Branton

In this letter the office of the Vice President informs Dr. King of the new role of Wiley Branton to serve as Executive Secretary of the President's Council on Equal Opportunity.

Letter from Katharine Gunning to President Johnson

Katharine Gunning of New York writes President Johnson and copies various dignitaries, including Dr. King. Gunning voices her opposition to the Vietnam War, in particular the bombing campaign, which she views as an escalation of the war.

Letter from Martin J. McNamara to MLK

Martin McNamara, Special Counsel to the Vice President, informs Dr. King that the Vice President regrets that he is unable to accept an invitation to address the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference in Stockholm, Sweden surrounding the issue of peace and the Vietnam War. Duff is an official with the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. She thanks Dr. King for meeting with her in San Francisco, California and urges him to attend the conference in Stockholm.

Letter from Representative James H. Scheuer to MLK

Congressman James Scheuer (D-New York) writes Dr. King that he believes progress is finally being made in Selma, Alabama, and he congratulations Dr. Kin on his excellent leadership.

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

Letter from Smithsonian Institution to MLK

S. Dillon Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, invites Dr. King to attend the bicentennial birthday celebration of the organization's founder, James Smithson.

Letter from Stephen J. M. Robbins to MLK

Stephen Robbins thanks Dr. King for inviting the United States National Student Association to participate in the demonstrations in Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. Robbins states that the organization has directed its focus to equal opportunity for all and protection for demonstrators. Robbins also invites Dr. King to address the 18th National Student Congress at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Letter from the Interseminary Movement's John Robert Nelson to MLK

J. Robert Nelson, National Chairman of the Interseminary Committee, invites Dr. King to be a part of their national conference with theological professors and students for the following year. He hopes that Dr. King will be the speaker on the subject of the Strategy of Churches and Ministers for Social Change.

Letter from Vice President Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Crisis in Detroit

In this letter, Vice President of the United States of America, Hubert Humphrey, writes to Dr. King to thank him for his statements promoting nonviolence in the crisis situation in Detroit, Michigan.

Letter to Hubert M. Humphrey from MLK

Dr. King writes Hubert M. Humphrey to praise his "matchless, exhaustive and courageous leadership" in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964. For his effort, Dr. King tells Congressman Humphrey that he has earned the "sincere gratitude" of the international community.

Letter to MLK from Vice President Hubert Humphrey

In this letter, U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his support and applauds him for all his hard work, while commenting on fair and decent housing.

Letter to MLK from VP Hubert H. Humphrey

This letter from Dr. King is from Vice President Humphrey and references recommendations for personnel and employment opportunities.

Letter to Ralph Abernathy Offering Suggestions

A supporter of the civil rights movement writes this letter to Reverend Abernathy. It is suggested that the Negro leaders of the civil rights movement consider the voting power of senior citizens. In order to get "a massive single solid vote bloc" it would be advantageous to also include the poor population. With this amount of supporters, the writer believes it would be possible to sustain a presidential candidacy. The author continues by telling Abernathy of Russia's economic goal.

Men of Past and Present Pamphlet

This pamphlet features quotes 'Men of Past and Present,' including religious and political leaders, on democracy and cooperatives.

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