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Jeremiah (Biblical prophet)

Associated Archive Content : 19 results

Bible 252

This exam from a course entitled "Bible 252" lists forty-eight questions regarding Biblical knowledge.

Exam for Bible 252 at Morehouse

This is an exam for Dr. King's Bible course, which lasted from September 1946 to May 1947, at Morehouse College. Dr. George D. Kelsey was the professor. Dr. King's notes are in the margins.

Freedom

Dr. King writes on the topic of "freedom," according to Jeremiah 1:5.

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.

Jeremiah

Dr. King records several scriptures from the biblical Book of Jeremiah.

Man

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 17:5 and suggests that “those of us who oppose humanism” might speak against it like Jeremiah did and provide a rational defense of theism.

Man

Dr. King interprets Jeremiah 51:17 to mean that man compared to God is stupid and man's knowledge compared to God's infinite knowledge is nothing.

Man

Dr. King records a quote from Jeremiah 17:9, which discusses the evilness of man.

Man (Sin)

Dr. King writes about Jeremiah's loss of confidence in man, reflecting on the biblical passage Jeremiah 9: 4-6.

MLK Examination Book for Bible Course

Dr. King answers a number of questions for an exam in his Bible course. He covers diverse topics, including prophecy and the Book of Job.

MLK's Examination Book for Bible Course

Dr. King writes this essay about the problems Habakkuk presents to Jehovah. He argues that God no longer judges humanity as a collective entity, but as individuals within humanity.

Nationalism

Dr. King refers to Jeremiah 1:5, explaining that this passage represents a departure from nationalism toward a more universal emphasis.

Sermon Text (Habakkuk)

Dr. King examines Habakkuk chapter 1, verses 2 through 4 to discuss whether the inequalities of life are justification to question God.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 5:4.

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King addresses his concerns about the rise of anti-Semitism in Germany.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

In the 3rd installment of "The Martin Luther King Column," Dr. King praises the Jewish people for seeking freedom for all. Dr. King discusses their contributions to "philanthropy and social organization."

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

In this column, Dr. King speaks of the outbreak of "Nazi-like degeneracy" less than 15 years after the Holocaust. He says that in spite of these evils, it should not discourage us from coming together as human beings, living in harmony and not letting the dangers of racism paralyze us as a world community.

The Meaning of Hope

Dr. King delivered this sermon while pastoring Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In spite of the existence of racial injustice in America, Dr. King maintains hope for equality, and reminds the church of their responsibility to "keep the flame of hope burning."

The New Covenant

Dr. King writes about the New Covenant, according to Jeremiah 31:33.